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Full text of "Police and peace officers' journal of the State of California"

ROOW 



SAN FRANCISCO 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 



REFERENCE BOOK 
Not to be taken from the Library 








[F[?a^K](ga§@(6) 



AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 

OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA 



•-! 



IIBRUARY 



• 
• 

* 

* 

• 




19 4 5 



• 
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* 

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• 



CHIEF OF POLICE CHARLES W. DULLEA 
Starts Sixth Year as Head of San Francisco Police Department 



• AN OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Compliments 



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SAN FRANCISCO 




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SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



Compliments of 

CRESCENT PACIFIC 
OIL CO. 

PETROLEUM PRODUCTS 



Compliments of 

PACIFIC FOUNDRY 
CO., Ltd. 

and 

PACIFIC METALS CO., Ltd. 




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SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



Compliments of 

FREDRICKSON BROS. 
Contractors 



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Emeryville. California 



February, 1945 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 1 



Featured in This Issue 

Page 

Police Commission Makes Fine Record During 

First Year 3 

By Opie L. Warner 
We Had a Lot to Learn . . . We Have Lots 

More to Learn J 

Bv Commisxon President }erd Sullivan 
Chief Dullea Completes Five Years as Head of 

S. P. Police Department 6 

By the Editor 
Lieutenant Maurice Reardon 7 

In-Service Police Training 8 

Bv B. C. Bridges 

Post-War Police Problems ...'.... 10 
By Chief Charles W. Dullea 

Oakland Police Aero Club 11 

By Howard 'Waldorf 

California's New State Department of Justice . 12 
By Attorney General Robert Kenny 

Bay Counties' Peace Officers' Association . . 13 

Panama Canal Zone Police 14 

By P. L. Dade 

Chief John D. Holstrom of Berkeley . . . . 1 "> 

By B. S. Saunders 

Inspector Butz Cracks Petrovich Murder . . . 16 

New S. F. Municipal Judges 18 

Dist. U. S. Secret Service Chief, W. A. Merrill 19 

Chief F. J. O'Ferrall of Narcotic Bureau ... 20 

NCPCO Association 22 

Sheriff Long's Clever Work Gets Murderer . 29 

Safe Crackers Caged 30 

FBI School in San Mateo 32 

Peninsula Peace Officers' Association . . . . 33 
Sergeant W. H. Thorpe of San Mateo P. D. 

Joins District Attorney's Staff 37 

S. F. Police B. of I. Annual Report .... 40 

FBI Delinquency Lectures Open 40 

FBI Police Academy California Graduates Feted 56 



Directory 



The Editor is always pleased to consider articles suitable for publication. 
■ Contributions should preferably be typewritten, but where this is not pos- 
sible, copy should be clearly written. Contributions may be signed with a 
"nom de plume," but all articles must bear the name and address of the 
sender, which will be treated with the strictest confidence. The Editor 
will also be pleased to consider photographs of officers and of interesting 
events. Letters should be addressed to the Editor. 



SAN FRANCISCO POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Hall of Justice, Kearny and Washington Streets 
Telephones SUtter 2020 - 2030 
Radio Short 'Wave Call KGPD 



Mayor, Hon. Roger D. Lapham 



BOARD OF POLICE COMMISSIONERS 

Regular Meetings, Monday, 8:00 p. m Hall of Justice 

Hon. Jerd Sullivan, President Crocker First Nat'l Bank 

Hon. John Wesley Howell 240 Battery Street 

Hon. E. L. Turkington Furniture Mart Bldg. 

Captain Charles F. Skelly, Secretary 
Room 104, Hall of Justice 



CHIEF OF POLICE Charles W. Dullea 

DEPUTY CHIEF OF POLICE Michael Riordan 

Dept. Sec'y Capt. John A. Engler Hall of Justice 

District Captains 

Central A. L. Christiansen 635 Washington St. 

Southern A. E. McDaniell Fourth and Clara Sts. 

Mission Leo J. Tackney 3057 17th St. 

Northern A. I. O'Brien 743 Ellis St. 

G. G. Park John A. Reed Stanyan opp. Waller 

Richmond F. J. McGuire 451 Sixth Ave. 

Ingleside....John M. Sullivan... .Balboa Pk., nr. San Jose Ave. 

Taraval Michael E. I. Mitchell 2348 24th Ave. 

PoTRERO Jos. M. Walsh 2300 Third St. 

Headquarters Patrick J. Murray Hall of Justice 

Traffic Bureau Chas. F. Skelly 635 Washington St. 

Bur. Inspectors B. J. McDonald Hall of Justice 

Supervising Captain of Districts. .M. GAFFEY..HaIl of Justice 

Director 

Bureau of Personnel.. ..Lt. James L. English. ...Hall of Justice 

Director - Bureau of 

Special Services.. ..Insp. Percy H. KENEALLY....Hall of Justice 

Director of 

Juvenile bureau.-Lieut. Geo. M. Healy..2745 Greenwich St. 

Director - Bureau of Criminal 

Information Lieut. George Hippely Hall of Justice 

Property Clerk Capt. John J. Wade Hall of Justice 

Insp. of Schools TRAFtic Control.. ..Insp. Byron Getchell 
Big Brother Bureau Lieut. Harry Reilly 



WhenlnTrouhle Call SUttCY 20-20 

When In UOUbt Always At Your service 



Page 2 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



February, 194^ 



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METAL FABRICATION 
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Compliments of 


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Oakland, Calif. 



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Distinctive Beverages 

Bottled by 

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ALAMEDA, CALIF. 



DAVE RUSS 

PAINTING - DECORATING 
WATERPROOFING 

Phone DElaware 9584 

If no answer, call EXbrook 2858 



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San Francisco 



Compliments of the 

MASON-LANDY MOTORS 



ALAMEDA, CALIF. 



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Honey Packers 



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ALAMEDA, CALIF. 



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Designing PROPELLERS Repitching 



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BRASS FOUNDERS 
AND FINISHERS 

Manufacturers 

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Machine Brass - Gun Metal and 

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ALAMEDA 



CALIFORNIA 



: San Francisco I 



"Efficient Police 

Make a City of 

Peace" 

I Established 1922) 




A Police News 

and Educational 

Magazine 

(Trade Maik Copyright) 



Vol. XXI 



February, 1945 



No. 11 



Police Commission Makes Fine Record 
During Its First Year 

Bv Opie L. W.^rner 



One of the first official acts of Mayor Roger D. Lap' 
ham, when he took over the job as the chief executive of 
San Francisco, was to appoint a new PoUce Commission, 
the three members appointed by former Mayor Angelo J. 
Rossi having turned in their resignation with the inaug- 
uration of the new Mayor. 




M.WOR Roger D. Lapham appointed present 
Police Commissioners 

He appointed Jerd Sullivan, vice-president of the 
Crocker National Bank, J. Wesley Howell, general man- 
ager of the Haslett Warehouse Company, and E. L. Turk- 
ington, formerly associated with the Healy-Tibbetts Con- 
struction Company, having had charge of building the 
approaches of the San Francisco and Oakland Bay Bridge, 
and since leaving that concern has been identified with 



the War Production Board. Mayor Lapham, in naming 
these three outstanding business men to the Police Board, 
displayed the same characteristic that has marked his se- 
lection of men with a background of accomplishments 
in the business world to carry out his announced policies 
and ideas on how the city should be operated. This care 
on his part explains why he has been so successful as 
Mayor of San Francisco. 

The present Police Commissioners have completed their 
first year of service, and by their achievements they have 
more than justified their appointment. They stated when 
first appointed that they had a lot to learn about running 
a police department, but that they were going to find out 
all they could in as short a time as possible. 

They have learned a lot during the first 12 months 
they have been in office, and they have applied what they 
have learned to the end that every member of the Police 
Department, from the highest to the lowest, give the 
maximum in protecting life, limb, property and liberty, 
and in every way keeping the peace so that San Francisco 
shall ever be a fine and safe city in which to live. 

During their first year the Police Commissioners have 
done much to carry out these ideals, and have made num- 
erous changes in the Department that have brought about 
better police administration. 

Among the important changes made during the past 
year are the following: 

The establishment of a Juvenile Bureau and the reopen- 
ing of the old North End Station with a fully staffed com- 
pany headed by a Captain of Police, assisted by men and 
women well trained in dealing with the ever-increasing 
problems. 

The closing of the Harbor Station and assigned the 
personnel of this station to the Central and Southern Police 
Districts where more men were sorely needed, in these 
expansive times. The Commission decided on this move 
when it was made apparent that the War Department had 



Page 4 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Februarx, 1945 



taken over the policing of the vast waterfront area, and 
the rest of the Harbor District was like a small town when 
the sun goes down and the sidewalks are taken up. So 
there was no need of continuing the Harbor Station and 
the force of men assigned to it. 

Then, confronted with a manpower shortage, the Com- 
mission last year decided that they could use women to 
ride the three-wheeled motorcycles. They made an order 
to that effect, had examinations held to select the women 
for that newly created war duration job, and today we 
have 10 of the fair sex riding their bikes in the downtown 
area, thus releasing that number of men for more exacting 
police duties. More women will be added as applicants 
qualify for the work. 




sonal welfare of the members of the San Francisco Police 
Department. Under its sponsorship and active and con- 
structive support the city's Police Officers have won three 
great benefits that gives them individual assurance of bet- 
ter living conditions, and a just reward when they retire 
from active service: 

These three benefits are : 

A fine pension plan, voted by the people last November, 
which will become effective May 1 , and which was heartily 
supported by Commissioners Sullivan, Howell and Turk- 
ington. 

The Police Department now has a basic 48-hour week. 

The members get overtime for working on holidays. 



Commissioner E. L. Turkingtjm 

Suitable headquarters have been provided, with all nec- 
essary equipment for the motorcycle corps attached to the 
Traffic Bureau. The new headquarters are on Clara Street 
and represents the latest arrangements. 

The San Francisco Bureau of Identification is being en- 
larged under the direction of Criminlogist Francis X. 
Latulipe, the first graduate from the San Francisco Police 
Department of the F. B. I. National Police Academy. 
Latulipe with the acquisence of the Police Commission has 
been told to make it the best Bureau of Identification 
in the United States, and that is what he is going to do. 

This year-old Police Commission has kept in office the 
men appointed to key positons by previous administration, 
and the Commission members have left the administration 
of law enforcement to these holdovers, demanding only 
that they and the men under them perform their duties in 
accordance with the laws of the land, and the rules and 
regulations provided for their guidance. 

These and many other activities have combined to give 
the most in police protection for the people of San 
Francisco. 

None the less in importance are the things that the 
Commission has done during their first year, for the per- 




COMMISSIONER J. WeSLEY HoWhLL 

In the history of the Police Department since the city 
charter went into effect in 1900 no such consideration has 
ever been accorded to the membership, the only thing that 
has ever been done in the past 44 years to help make life 
a little better for them was a raise in salaries, some times 
long deferred. Yet this present commission, in its first year 
in office, has seen that the 1300 men and women who make 
up our Police Department be given security and working 
conditions that many hoped for but mighty few felt they 
would ever get. 

In all these almost revolutionary moves for the welfare 
of the peace officers of this city, the Police Commission 
gave its fullest support and rendered constructive aid in 
the fulfillment of these aims, which in other lines of en- 
deavor the wage earner has long enjoyed. 

Commissioner Sullivan, who is the president of the 
Board is a civic-minded citizen, and though he has taken 
an active part in municipal affairs, he never sought public 
office, and he was drafted as a member of the Police Com- 
mission by his personal friend. Mayor Lapham, whom he 
supported so well during the mayoralty campaign 14 
months ago. Though he has an important position with 
(Continued on page il) 



February, 1945 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 5 



WE HAD A LOT TO LEARN . . . 
WE HAVE LOTS MORE TO LEARN 

By JERD SULLIVAN 

President Board of Police Commission 

San Francisco Police Department 

The present Police Commission has completed 
its first year in office; we have learned a lot — we 
have lots more to learn. We have taken our jobs 




Police Commissioner Jerd Sullivan 

seriously, with two objectives in mind: one — to do 
a good job for the City of San Francisco, and, two, 
to do a good job for the Police Department. 

I, personally, have never tackled a job where 
there were more back-seat drivers and Monday- 
morning quarterbacks. We have tried, however, to 
approach the problem from the standpoint of de- 
veloping a greater morale amongst the rank and 
file of the men in the Department. This we have 
tried to do in various ways — such as getting behind 
the new pension plan that the people recently ap- 
proved, giving the men a chance to work on their 
day off for extra pay, etc. The new pension should, 
eventually, lower the age of retirement so that the 
younger men may look forward to earlier pro- 
motions. 

We have tried to impress on the men the advan- 
tage of handling the citizens courteously. This is 
just good salesmanship, because the people they 
contact are the ones who some day go to the polls 
and, by their vote, decide whether the Police De- 
partment is going to get a better pension or a raise 
in pay. 



S.F. POLICE WIDOWS' AND ORPHANS' 

AID ASSN'S ANNUAL BALL 

The annual ball and show that goes with that event, 
of the San Francisco Police Widows' and Orphans' As- 
sociation will be held this year on the night of April 7, in 
the Civic Auditorium. 

Captain Michael E. I. Mitchell, of Taraval Station is 
the general chairman of the committee in charge of the 
current entertainment. 

Other officers of the general committee are : 

Lieutenant Edward Pootel of Company B, first vice 
president. 

Lieutenant John Meehan of the Juvenile Bureau, second 
vice president. 

Officer Henry M. Schizler, of the Property Clerk's of- 
fice, treasurer. 

Officer Matthew Carberry, of Headquarters Company, 
secretary. 

Officers throughout the city are now selling tickets to 
this great show that brings in money badly needed for the 
widows and orphans of police officers who answer the last 
roll call. 

Last year's ball was the most successful in the history of 
the Association, and the members in charge of this year's 
dance are aiming to beat last year's record. 



MOLKENBUHR BROS, 

"REPUTATION EARNED" 





Seamon Molkenbuhr 



Val Molkenbuhr 



Distributors 

LENOX HALL JEWELRY 

Biltmore Luggage 
Entire Third Floor 

23 GRANT AVENUE 

Opposite Magnin's 



Page 6 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



February, 194) 



Chief Dullea Completes Five Years As Head 
of S. F. Police Department 



By The Editor 



On February H, Chief Charles W. Dullea completed 
his fifth year as commander of the San Francisco Police 
Department : 

Most of those five years he has served as Chief of 
Police this country has been engaged in the present World 
War, and participating in this far-flung conflict as no 
other nation has done, in furnishing men, women and the 
necessary tools of war. 

This great World War II has presented to the peace 
ofiicers of the United States many additional problems 
of law enforcement. It can well be said that the law en- 
forcement agencies of this nation have acquitted them- 
selves so well that they will be given many pages, telling 
of their achievements, in the history of this war. 

No Chief of Police has been confronted with more 
complex problems than Chief Dullea. That he has met 
these problems is attested by the fact that he has time 
and again been singled out by national and state officials 
to present his vews on crime and its suppression. 

He has been called to Washington on numerous occa- 
sions during the past few years to sit in with men who 
have and are taking a prominent part in the conduct of 
the present war. 

He is often consulted by Governor Earl Warren, who 
made him head of the State War Council. 

He is president of the California State Peace Officers' 
Association, and Fourth Vice-President of the Interna- 
tional Association of Chiefs of Police. In both these organ- 
izations he has contributed much to the purposes and 
aims of each. He has presented constructive ideas on juve- 
nile delinquency; control of prostitution and its by-prod- 
ucts of the two social diseases; he has worked for the 
adoption of uniform laws for the various jurisdictions; as 
• well as methods of procedure in all the various crimes; he 
has worked for the enactment of the mutual aid plan, now- 
interesting all police and sheriff officials: he has done much 
for the advancement of two-way radio in law enforce- 
ment work; and he has given much study and put into 
operations many changes to control the motorists who use 
our streets and highways. 

These and many other lesser things has singled him out 
as a leader in police administration. 

Since he first was appointed to guide the destinies of 
the Police Department, Chief Dullea has seen San Fran- 
cisco increase in population from 650,000 to nearly a 
million people. 

San Francisco has become the greatest area for the pro- 
duction of ships, ammunition and various other essential 
war materials. The city's great industrial plants have 
grown in size and number, bringing tens of thousands of 
defense workers to operate these properties. 

San Francisco has become the greatest port of em- 



barkation, with untold numbers of men loading ships with 
the necessary equipment so our men in the Pacific areas 
of this global war may keep up the great work they are 
doing. Also from this port untold numbers of men and 
women are being sent to the Pacific war theaters, and, too, 
many are being brought back. All these call for hundreds 
and hundreds of sea-going vessels to make the necessary 
transportation. 

All these great activities have meant more work for 
the Police Department. Newcomers from all parts of the 
United States and from some foreign countries have been 
attracted by the needs for work in the many war plants. 
Among these there is a certain percentage who have run 
afoul of the law elsewhere. They have to be watched. Yet 
there has been no increase of crime since the war started'. 
In fact the figures of the records of the Police Department 
show that the peace of the city is as fine as it was in 
normal times. 

Chief Dullea has many added duties to his office, which 
brings him in contact with high officials of the U. S. Army, 
Navy, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard. He has worked 
in harmonious co-operation with these men, as well as 
with the Federal Bureau of Investigation. In all these 
organizations he is held in the highest respect. 

He has given his wholehearted support to the campaign 
waged by the War Department to stamp out the spread- 
ing of venereal diseases, especially among the fighting men. 
So well has he carried out his part in this nation-wide pro- 
gram, San Francisco enjoys a high place as a well con- 
trolled city as far as vice and prostitution are concerned. 

The death rate from automobile accidents is the lowest 
of any city of comparable size. 

The city is quite free from pickpockets and bunco men, 
and during his tenancy bank robberies are something that 
don't occur here. Other robberies and major burglaries 
are at an unbelievable minimum. 

Chief Dullea has taken a leading part in every move- 
ment designed to give the utmost protection to the people 
of the city in any emergency the war might create. He 
organized the Air Raid Wardens, who did such fine work 
when things looked pretty black for this city and other 
Pacific Coast communities. Under his administration the 
city now has a fine Auxiliary Police Force, giving of their 
time to take the place to a certain extent, of the more 
than 200 men of the Department who have joined the 
fighting forces of our nation. 

The morale of the San Francisco Police Department 
under Chief Dullea, particularly since the war started, 
has been of the highest order. The members under his com' 
mand have been called upon several times to meet some 
emergency and they have responded with alacrity and 
(Continued on page 27 ) 



February, J 94 J 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 7 



Lieutenant Maurice Reardon 



During his thirty years of service in the San Francisco 
Police Department, Lieutenant Maurice Reardon has 
crowded more than his share of poHce activities into his 
various assignments as one of the City's Finest. 

His present assignment as head of the Check Detail is 
probably the most colorful of the various details of the 
Bureau of Inspectors. A short visit to the Check Detail 



r 



X 



Lieutenant Maurice Reardon 

could easily be prolonged for hours hearing the thousand- 
and-one tricks resorted to by people who try to live well 
and leisurely by exchanging worthless paper for coin of 
the realm — this vast army being professionally known as 
"paper hangers." 

Specimens of the work of some of these so-called "paper 
hangers" bear mute evidence to the fact that many ex- 
ceptionally clever people deliberately prostitute their 
natural gifts or tediously acquired technique. For small 
sums — ranging down from $20.00 to $6.19 — one check 
passer actually perforated the paper, with a needle, printed 
the name of the particular public utility corporation in 
green, red, and black, the finished product appearing more 
than 99 per cent perfect. Any one of these checks would 
require at least three days' labor! 

In discussing the various methods of securing real money 
for useless checks, one readily realizes how busy business 
people so constantly lose millions to the wily army of those 
who are handy with a pen and ready with an honest-to- 
goodness story as to the state of their present finances. 

Eventually these law-breakers make some little slip and, 
when in the toils of the law. they do either of two things: 
Make good the loss to the complainant, or plead guilty and 
go to the penitentiary. Usually they are a tractable class 
and, due to that fact, their prison term is much shorter 
than that of the regular run of the penitentiary' habitues. 



Lieutenant Reardon considers check passers as a low 
grade class of citizens, feeling that — with their unusual 
ability — they could easily make a good living by following 
a legitimate line of endeavor. 

For years the lieutenant was assigned to the City Grand 
Jury. He consequently knows personally more members of 
the City Hall staff than any member of the San Francisco 
Police Department. Heads of city departments, mayors, 
city office staffs — all are friends of the amiable lieutenant. 

But it is in Hollywood he is the most popular San Fran- 
cisco Police Officer. Even the stars of the silent screen call 
him by his first name. Many of them thank him sincerely 
for his advice — given when they were on location here in 
San Francisco. During the terms of office of all the Chiefs 
of Police, from Chief D. A. 'White to the present, Maurice 
Reardon has been assigned to look out for the interests of 
the many moving picture groups arriving in San Francisco. 
The lieutenant is energetic, loyal and witty. Hollywood 
directors like him so well that on many occasions they have 
broached the subject of drafting him. 

Lieutenant Reardon is a tireless worker. From his entry 
to the department in April 1914 he has been noted as a 
thorough student. Thus he has forged his way ahead, 
through the ranks of corporal, sergeant, and lieutenant to 
land on the present captains' list. 



WINTER DRIVING RULES 

The following practices, based on National Safety 
Council research, are recommended "winter rules for 
auto pools" or all who must drive this winter; 

1. If you must drive this winter, fill your car to com- 
fortable capacity and go prepared to get through, re- 
gardless of snow or ice. 

2. Reduce your speed to conform to the conditions of 
the road — and take no chances. 

3. Use tire chains on ice and snow to reduce braking 
distances as much as 40 or 'lO per cent. Chains also pro- 
vide necessary "go" traction, and uniformity in per- 
formance under severe winter road conditions. 

4. Follow other vehicles at a safe distance. It takes from 
3 to 11 times as long to stop without anti-skid chains 
when pavements are snowy or icy. 

5. Apply brakes on slippery pavements lightly and with 
pumping action. If you jam on the brakes, they may lock 
and throw your car into a dangerous skid. Try to avoid 
need for making a quick stop in front of another vehicle. 
A rear-end collision may cripple your car for the duration. 

6. Keep windshield and windows clear of snow and ice 
outside, and fog and frost inside. Remember, you must 
see danger to avoid it. 

7. Keep posted on winter road and weather conditions. 
A safe driver is always aware of his limitations and equip- 
ped to get through safely and on time. Be a good defen- 
sive driver. 



Page 8 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



February, 1945 



In-Service Police Training 



By B. C. Bridges 

Superintendent Bureau of Identification 

Alameda Police Department 



The position occupied by law enforcement in the United 
States today is curious, to say the least, in view of what 
is expected of peace officers, and the illogic of such ex- 
pectations. Those of us who are engaged in police work 
believe that the average officer is honest, and tries to dis- 
charge his duties to the best of his ability. However, it 
sometimes happens that even this "best" may prove in- 
adequate in certain requirements, because the man has not 
been properly trained for the job. 

The credulity of popular opinion in this matter is 
nothing short of amazing. Common practice chooses se- 
lectees for enforcement work, with slight thought as to their 
qualifications, thrusts them abrutly into their assigned 
positions, and immediately demands performance which 
could reasonably be expected only from trained and ex- 
perienced specialists. The results speak for themselves; but 
the fault is not that of the officer. 

To many peace officers, all this is an old story; and 
we ponder the solution. Obviously, a suitable pre-service 
training program is the logical recourse. However, it re- 
quires a great deal of crusading to arouse public con- 
sciousness from its habitual lethargy. Such a crusade is 
being conducted now by many dynamic leaders in our 
field, and we can report considerable progress. Neverthe- 
less, we still face the more immediate problem of helping 
those who already are in police service, and who may 
never have the opportunity to attend a police-training 
school. For those and many other potential students who 
are variously handicapped, there is still the recourse of 
self-education. 

An "educated" person has been described as one who 
knows something about everything, and everything about 
something. This qualification probably is more desirable 
in police work than in any other field, as well attested by 
the many and diversified demands upon this public service. 

Formerly, the acquiring of an education in any branch 
of human endeavor was difficult. Fortunately, that time 
is past; now there is small excuse for ignorance. Of course, 
there are some whose intelligence level permits of little 
betterment under any circumstances; but for those who 
have the incentive to learn, information of all kinds is as 
omnipresent as the air, and usually as free, requiring only 
the student's initiative. However, the old truism still holds 
cood: "There is no royal road to learning;" and those 
who desire self -education must earn it through individual 
effort. 

Despite these facts, there are both good and had methods 
in every undertaking. To set forth upon an uncharted 
course of studv amid bewildering numbers of textbooks, 
all dealing directlv or indirectly with law enforcement, 
could result in a lifetime of reading, with scant accomp- 



lishment; and with this fact in mind, the included refer- 
ence texts are recommended for the student peace officer 
who is interested in improving himself and his contemp- 
oraries. 

This list of books was compiled under the supervision of 
August Vollmer, to whose efforts modern police methods 
owe their inception and present attainment. It presents 
the "first-selection" texts on the subjects listed, as advo- 
cated by the world's leading authorities in each of the 
included departments of police science. 

It will be apparent that such a compilation has more 
than ordinary possibilities. Any student who assimilates 
all the information contained in this group of books will 
have acquired an ample educational background in police 
work. 

Throughout America there are many persons, both in 
and out of police service, who do not yet fully realize 
that the business of efficient law enforcement is a special' 
ized science demanding a highly trained personnel. It de- 
volves upon those of us who are aware of this to objectify 
such information for the benefit of others; and to this pur- 
pose the writer submits the included directive advice and 
the appended list of texts, with the hope that they may 
assist in bettering the American Police System : 

Recommended Reference Texts 
I. — Police Organization and Administration 

1. "Municipal Police Administration," O. W. Wilson 6? Theo 
Hall. International City Managers' Association, Chicago. 111. 

2. "Rural Crime Control," Bruce Smith. Institute of Public 
Administration, Columbia University, New York. 

3. "State and Provincial Police." International Association of 
Chiefs of Police, University Traffic Institute, Northwestern 
University. 

4. "Crime Control by the T^ational Government," Millspaugh. 
The Brookings Institution. Washington, D. C. 

5. "Commdnd, Staff, and Tactics," (Army Text). The Gen- 
eral Service Schools Press, Ft. Leavenworth. Kansas. 

6. "Distribution o/ Police Patrol Force," O. W. Wilson. Pub- 
lic Administration Service, Chicago, 111. 

7. "Police Records. Their Installation and Use." O. W. Wil- 
.son. Public Administration Service, Chicago, 111. 

8. "Police Cominunication Systems," V. A, Leonard, Uni- 
versity of California Press. Berkeley, Calif, 

9. "Preventing Crime, ' Sheldon Glucck 6? Eleanor Glueck. 
McGraw-Hill. 

II. — Police Practice and Procedure 

1. "Elements of Police Science." Rollin M. Perkins. Fountain 
Press, Inc., Chicago, 111, 

2. "Police Methods for Today and Tomorroiv," G, D. Callan, 
Duncan Press, Newark, N. J. 

3. "Crime Is a Business," John McDonald. Stanford Uni- 
versity Press, 

4. "Riot Control," Sterling A. Wood. Military Service Publish- 
ing Company. Harrisburg. Pa. 



Febr 



J 945 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 9 



5. "Combat Jiu-jitsu." S. R. Linck. Stevens-Ness Law Pub- 
lishing Company. 

6. "Mastering the Pistol and the Revolver." Morris Fisher. 
G. P. Putnam's Sons. 

Interrogation 

1. "Lie Detection and Criminal Interrogation," Fred E. Inbau. 
The Williams y Wilkins Company, Baltimore, Md. 

2. "Criminal Psychology," Hans Gross. Little, Brown 6? Co., 
Boston, Mass. 

3. "Psychology of Feeling and Emotion." C. A. Ruckmich. 
McGraw-Hill. 

4. "Police Interrogation," W. R. Kidd. New York Police 
Journal. 

III. — Criminal Investigation 

1. "Modern Criminai Investigation," Soderman & O'Connell. 
Funk 6? Wagnalls Company. 

2. "Homicide Investigation," LeMoigne Snyder. C. C. Thomas. 
Publisher. 

3. "Criminal Investigation," Charles Fricke. O. W. Smith, 
PubUsher. 

4. "Textbooi;^ of Firearms Investigation, Identification and 
Evidence," J. S. Hatcher, Small-Arms Technical Publish- 
ing Company, Marines, Onslow County, N. C. 

5. "Identification of Firearms," Jack Gunther S" Charles Gun- 
ther. John S. Wiley 6? Sons, Inc. 

6. "Questioned Documents," Albert S. Osborn. Boyd Print 
Company, Albany, N. Y. 

7. "The Electron Microscope," E. F. Burton S" W. H. Kohll. 
Reinhold Pubhshing Corp., New York City. 

IV. — Criminal Identifcation 

1. "Practical Fingerprinting." B. C. Bridges. Funk ^ Wag- 
nalls Company. 

2. "Single Finger Prints," Harry Battley. Yale University 
Press. 

3. "Single Finger Print System," J. A. Larson. D. Appleton 
and Company. 

4. "Finger Prints, Palms and Soles." Cummins ^ Midlow. 
The Blakiston Company, Pa. 

5. "Medico-Legal Aspects of the Ruxton Case." Glaister ^ 
Brash. E. S. Livingston, 17 Teviot Place, Edinburgh. 

V. — Legal Medicine and Toxicology 

1. "Legal Medicine and Toxicology," Ralph W. Webster. 
Saunders Company, Philadelphia, Pa. 

2. "A Textboo\ of Medical Jurisprudence and Toxicology," 
John Glaister. E. S. Livington, 17 Teviot Place, Edinburgh. 

3. "Recent Advances In Forensic Medicine," Sidney Smith ^ 
John Glaister. The Blakiston Company, Pa. 

4. "Legal Chemistry and Scientific Criminai Investigation," 
Alfred Lucas. E. Arnold, London, England. 

VI. — Traffic Regulation and Control 

1. "Accident Investigation Manual" (several authors). North- 
western University Traffic Institute. 

2. "The Evidence Handbool^ for Police." Franklin M. Kreml. 
Northwestern University Traffic Institute. 

3. "Trafic Engineering Handbook," National Conservation 
Bureau, 60 John Street, New York City. 

4. "Why We Have Automobile Accidents," Harry R. De- 
Silva. John Wiley fi Sons, Inc. 

5. "Trafic Accidents and Congestion." Maxwell Halsey. John 
Wiley y Sons, Inc. 

6. "Tragic Courts." George Warren. Little, Brown and Com- 
pany. 

VII. — Criminal Law and Procedure 

1. "Criminal Law and Procedure." James J. Robinson. The 
Lawyers Co-operative Publishing Company, Rochester, New 
York. 



2. "Judicial Proof. Logic and Psychology." Wigmore. Little. 
Brown and Company. 

3. "Principles and Methods in Dealing With Offenders." by 
Helen Pigeon and others. Pennsylvania Municipal Public 
Survey, State College. 

4. "Theft, Law and Society," Jerome Hall. Little, Brown 
and Company. 

VIII. — Criminology 

1. "Criminology," Dr. Robert Gault. D. C. Heath y Company. 

2. "Criminology," Donald R. Taft, McMillan Co. 

3. "Principles of Criminology," E. H. Sutherland. J. B. Lip- 
pincott Co. 

4. "Jvletv Lights on Delinquency," William Healy. Institute 
of Human Relations. Yale University Press. 

1. "Jsjeu' Horizons m Criminology." Barnes y Teeters. Pren- 
tice Hall, Inc. 

IX. — Photography 

1. "Basic Photography. Technical Manual." (War Dept.). 
Supt. of Documents, Washington, D. C. 

2. "Legal Photography," Charles C. Scott. Vernon Law Books 
Co., Kansas City, Mo. 

3. "Infra-Red for Everyone." H. W. Greenwood. Chemical 
Publishing Co., New York City. 

4. "Photomicrography," Roy M. Allen. D. Van Nestrand 
Company, Inc. 

X . — Cryptography 

1. "Crytography" (New Edition), Andre Langie. E. P. Dut- 
ton and Company. 

2. "Crytography," Laurence D. Smith. W. W. Norton y Co. 

3. "First Course In Cryptoanalysis." Jack Wolfe. Brooklyn 
College Press. 

The foregoing list is a critical selection of authoritative 
works in the several fields comprehended under the general 
term "Law Enforcement and Criminology." 

For students who desire to specialize in any one or more 
of the several branches, it is recommended that they con- 
sult the "Bibliographies of Crime and Criminal Justice" 
by Dorothy Culver Thompson; The H. W. Wilson Com- 
pany, publishers. 



S. F. POLICE OFFICER WINNER 
OF FELLOWSHIP 

San Francisco Police Sergeant Arthur P. Williams has 
won a fellowship in the Kemper Foundation for Traffic 
Police Training, one of sixteen fellowships awarded 
throughout the country, and has left to attend the four- 
month course at Evanston, 111. 

A check to defray expenses was presented Williams 
here by R. C. Barr, regional safety director for the Lum- 
bermen's Mutual Casualty Company. 

Other San Francisco officers who have received the 
training are John E. Curley, Lieutenant James L. Quigley, 
Sergeant Edward J. Moody, and Sergeant Ralph E. 
Olstad. 



Inspector Ray O'Brien has been added to the staff of 
the Homicide Detail headed by Inspector Harry Husted. 
The Detail is now made up of four men, the other two 
being Inspectors Frank Ahern and Al Corrassa. 



Page W 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



February, 194 J 



Post -War Police Problems 

By Chief of Police Charles W. Dullea 
(Presented at the Annual War Conference of the International Association of Chiefs of Police at Cleveland in August 



(Continued from Last Issue) 
VI. Equipment 

Police Administrators should insist that modern equip- 
ment be provided for their Departments, pointing out 
that an efficient police organization must have every facil- 
ity in order to cope successfully with their problems. 

New police buildings must be provided in the post-war 
building programs, and they should be modern in every 
particular and erected in locations suitable for rendering 
a maximum of police service. Motor equipment, auto- 
mobile and motorcycle, both solo and three-wheeler, 
should be requisitioned for. Thought should be given to- 
ward using the three-wheelers for beat patrol. They are 
economical of operation and should be radio-equipped, 
thus having the patrolman constantly in touch with the 
station. Every police vehicle should be equipped with 
the most modern radio communication sets and all patrol 
cars should have loud speaker equipment to be used when 
necessary in giving instructions, in controlling crowds 
and in directing traffic or in other emergencies. 

Police Headquarters and stations should be equipped 
with every modern scientific device. Police Departments 
of a size sufficient to warrant its installation, should have 
a laboratory adequately staffed and equipped to assist in 
the investigation of serious crimes. Larger departments 
should encourage their neighboring law enforcement units 
to take advantage of their facilities. It is recommended 
that you survey your needs immediately and file your 
requisition for materials, supplies and equipment, because 
if you wait until the emergency arrives you find yourself 
just another agency of government appealing for aid to 
a possibly unsympathetic audience. 

Consideration should be given toward establishing a 
Committee within the I.A.C.P. to investigate the possibil- 
ity of obtaining equipment presently used by the armed 
forces and suitable for police work. A vast supply of 
automotive and radio equipment which will be of no use 
to the Army and Navy at the conclusion of the war will 
he available for police department use. A catalog of this 
material, setting out its description and location could 
be furnished to this committee, who in turn could advise 
Police Chiefs who would be interested in acquiring it. 
It is possible that grants could be made by the Govern- 
ment to Police Departments and thus prevent this equip- 
ment from getting into possession of persons who might 
use it unlawfully. 

VII. Traffic 

The traffic problem that will develop after the war is 
not one of speculation, but is an absolute certainty. We 
are indeed fortunate that the International Association 
of Chiefs- of Police have instituted and cultivated a pro- 
gram of Traffic education and enforcement under the 



guidance of the Safety Division at Northwestern Uni- 
versity. It would be presumptuous for me to discuss this 
phase of post-war activity, especially when an important 
section of this Conference has been assigned to a dis- 
cussion of this subject by recognized authorities. I would 
be derelict in my duty, however, if I did not urge all mem- 
bers of this Association to avail themselves of the oppor- 
tunity to obtain the benefits of this planning program and 
seek the advice of the Safety Division in considering your 
traffic problems. 

We can anticipate not only revolutionary automotive, 
but also airplane traffic problems. The transportation in- 
dustry has been planning for a conversion of their facili- 
ties to peacetime production and unless we keep abreast 
of the movement our policing program will be outmoded. 
Certainly, super-highways will be constructed and the 
safety factor must not be forgotten in the desire for 
speed. In any good constructing program, police officials 
should urge that off-street loading and parking facilities 
be provided and that the highways be used for moving 
traffic. 

Many communities have instituted traffic regulations 
during the wartime period which were originally intended 
to assist the movement of emergency traffic hut which have 
proven beneficial to the traffic problem as a whole. These 
regulations dealt mainly with one-way streets, skip-stops, 
restricted parking, etc., and their observance by the civilian 
community has now become a habit and if they have 
proven their worth it is recommended that serious thought 
be given before they are rescinded. With demands being 
made for manpower in police activities other than traffic 
mechanical devices for the regulation of traffic should be 
sought in increased quantities and their installation would 
release men who are assigned to fixed post duties and 
permit of their employment in other fields. 

VIII Dep.artmental Surveys 
Post-War Planning should include a survey of De- 
partments, giving particular attention to the shift of the 
population within the community. Areas that were cov- 
ered by foot patrol for years may be adequately patrolled 
by radio cars. A beat study should be made and in sec- 
tions where business has moved to another locality, a cor- 
responding change in beats should follow. It may be nec- 
essary to relocate station houses so that a maximum amount 
of protection can be given to the community. Severe 
criticism is often leveled at departments on account of the 
insanitary condition of the jails and cells where prisoners 
are kept. Police Chiefs cannot be held responsible for these 
situations and should demand modern and well-equipped 
station houses and places of detention when planning for 
new police buildings. 

The practice of uniform crime reporting and the uni- 
( Continued on page 46 ) 



Fehruar\', 1945 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 11 



Oakland Police Aero Club First Such Club 
in the United States 

By Howard Waldorf 
Aviation Editor and City Hall Reporter, Oakland "Post-Enquirer" ) 



As sure as shooting, when this world conflict and its 
spectacular aerial warfare are over, the up-to-date crooks 
are going to hop into fast airplanes for their getaway, in- 
stead of the high-powered cars of yester^'ear. 

That will mean the police departments will have to 
take to the air and adopt war combat tactics to catch 




The entire membership of the Oakland Police Aero Club, the first 
police air squadron in the United States. Left to right: Inspector 
Anthony /. Morgenthal, Oficer Leo Brandt, now retired. Captain 
(then Sergeant) Ira F. Reedy, and Lieutenant (then Sergeant) 
Harleigh D. Calame. 

them. Already looking into the situation and the 
prospective problems of the post-war air age is the Oakland 
Police Department, where Chief of Police Robert P. Tracy 
has the advantage of the advice and experience of three 
veterans who organized the first police aero squadron in 
the United States. 

The flying pioneers are Captain Ira F. Reedy, chief of 
the traffic division; Lieutenant Harleigh D. Caleme, of 
Central Division; and Inspector Anthony J. Morgenthal. 
in charge of police radio. Together with Officer Leo 
Brandt, now retired, they organized the Oakland Police 
Aero Club in the spring of 1928. Young fellows bitten by 
the flying bug born of the Lindbergh hop to Paris and 
other transoceanic trailblazers. they decided to learn to 
fly with a view of applying that knowledge to their police 
work. 

The Oakland Police Aero Club was officially recognized 
by the Oakland Port Commission and flourished, with ups 
and downs, for nearly five years until pioneering misfor- 
tunes forced its abandonment. 

While they never were credited with an actual capture, 
the flying four voluntarily assisted in a number of cases 
and flew scores of simulated police missions — all at their 



own expense and on their own time. 

Lieutenant Calame sums up the years of pioneering 
thusly : 

"We learned a lot about flying and sky policing, all of 
It the hard way, but it was a lot of fun." 

Financed by the individual members as a non-profit 
organization, the club blossomed at Oakland airport in the 
spring of 1928, just after the Dole race to Hawaii, when 
the public still regarded the airplanes of the day as flying 
machines, and their operators as aviators. The club's first 
purchase of sky equipment was an OX-5 powered Waco 
biplane that cruised at 80 miles an hour. The price was 
$2,900. In this they learned to fly under the direction of 
G. H. "Wee Willie" Willingham, now test-hopping B-29s; 
Norman Brown: Calame's stepson, Chan Keeney, and 
others. 

A financial headache, the first of iliany, developed in 
the path of their plan right ofi^ the bat. Captain Reedy 
recalls. 

"Wee Willie had quite a temper and when we didn't 
catch onto a flying lesson as quickly as he thought we 
ought to he would take the plane up and tie it in knots, 
looping and rolling all over the sky until he cooled down. 
This stunting always was too much for the plane and 
every time he did it we had to lay the ship up for exten- 
sive repairs." 

Despite these outbursts, the four policemen soloed in 
less than 10 flying hours and quickly won their private 
licenses. At this point, they went into a huddle and came 
(Continued on page 49 J 



ir-™*** ss*^-^ ^^^ ^'"^■>»i 



•.A««Msrw%aaarB 




Officers Reedy, Calame and Brandt in a bac\-to-earth celebration 
of Calame's solo flight. 



Page 12 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



February, 1945 



California's New State Department of Justice 



By Robert W. Kenny 



What is the California Department of Justice? 

What are its functions, its responsibilities? 

Just how does the ofHce of Attorney General appear 
in the new pattern? 

What are the changes, if any in the former duties 
and responsibilities of the Narcotic Division and the 
Bureau of Identification? 




Attorney-General Robert W, Kenny 

heads State Department of Justice 

These are some of the questions which have cropped 
up from time to time in the minds of civil service em- 
ployees of the State. The following text may assist those 
who are interested in obtaining an overall picture of the 
California Department of Justice which was set by the 
Legislature and inaugurated May 1, 1944. 

The essential change made by the creation of the new 
department was the fact that two separate agencies of 
State government — the Division of Criminal Identifica- 
tion and Investigation and the Narcotic Division were 
drawn in to the new Department of Justice with the 
office of the Attorney General — the Attorney General 
being the head of this new Department of State gov- 
ernment. The essential fact to keep in mind is that the 
Department of Justice gives to the people of California 
and all its law enforcement officers, one single agency law 
enforcement by placing all these agencies under one head, 
i. e., the Attorney General. A single agency makes avail- 
able a more expeditious and stream-lined service to all 
local officers throughout the State. 

The new structural set up of the Department of Jus- 
tice falls into these six main divisions: 

1. Division of Criminal Law, headed by Assistant At- 
torney General Jess Hession. 

2. Division of Civil Law, headed by Chief Assistant 
Attorney General Hartwell H. Linney. 



3. Division of General Administration headed by Eu- 
gene Huston. 

4. Division of Identification, headed by Chief Joseph 
H. McClelland. 

5 . Division of Investigation, headed by Chief Joseph H. 
McClelland, 

6. Division of Narcotic Enforcement headed by Chief 
Joseph O'Ferrall. 

The following will give some of the highlights regarding 
the various divisions under the Department of Justice: 

The Office of Attorney General 

The Attorney General is the chief law enforcement 
officer of the State and must see that the laws are uni- 
formly and adequately enforced in every county. Every 
District Attorney and Sheriff is under the direct super- 
vision of the Attorney General in all matters pertaining 
to the duties of their respective offices. The Attorney 
General may require of such officers written reports con- 
cerning investigations, detection, prosecution and pun- 
ishment of crimes. Whenever he is satisfied that the law 
is not adequately enforced in a particular county, the 
Attorney General must prosecute such violations as are 
within the jurisdiction of the Superior Court. 

The Governor may direct the Attorney General to 
assist any District Attorney in the performance of his 
duties. 

Some of the other functions pertaining to law enforce- 
ment of the Attorney General are : 

Rendering opinions to the Legislature, the Governor, 
Secretary of State, Controller, Treasurer, Superintendent 
of Public Instruction, Trustees or Commissions of State 
institutions and District Attorneys, and various State 
boards, and assist any District Attorney when directed 
to do so by the Governor. 

Defends civil actions brought against any State employee 
properly performing his official duties. 

At the request of the Governor, he investigates de- 
mands for extradition. 

In conjunction with the Secretary of State prepares for 
each general election a digest of election laws for the use 
of county clerks. 

Civil Service St.-\tus 

The employees of the Attorney General's office, includ- 
ing deputies attorney general, were placed under civil 
service as of January, 1944. The first civil service exami- 
nation for durational appointments were held in May, 
1944. 

Some Highlight Cases 

Among some of the interesting cases recently handled 
by the Attorney General's office are: 

Pacific States Building and Loan Association. 
In 1943, the Attorney General's office assumed com- 
( Continued on page S3) ■ 



February. 194*? 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page ]3 



BAY COUNTIES' 



Peace Officers' Association 



MEETINGS EVERY MONTH 



Chief Howard A. Zink, President 



Captain Bernard McDonald, Secretary-Treasurer 



The last meeting of the year of 1944 for the Bay Coun- 
ties' Peace Officers' Association was held in the Alameda 
Hotel, Alameda, on December 28. Chief George R. Doran 
was host. The spacious dining room was well filled by 
peace officers and their guests, and the management of the 
hotel put on a swell luncheon. 




Chief Howard A. Zink 

Sheriff Daniel Murphy called the meeting to order at 
the conclusion of the luncheon. 

Election of officers for 1945 was a featured part of the 
day's program, and the following were voted in on recom- 
mendation of the nominating committee, headed by Chief 
Donald Wood, chairman: 

President — Chief Howard A. Zink, Palo Alto. 

Vice-President— Sheriff H. P. (Jack) Gleason, Alameda. 

Secretary-Treasurer — Captain of Inspectors Bernard J. 
McDonald, San Francisco. 

In opening the meeting Sheriff Murphy called upon 
Chief Doran to present the Mayor and other city officials 
who were special guests of the occasion. Chief Doran then 
introduced Mayor M. C. Godfrey, who extended a warm 
welcome to all those present. 

Other city officials asked to take a bow were: City 
Manager Charles Schwarnenberg; City Clerk, J. P. Clark; 
Police Judge Daniel H. Kno.x; City Attorney Stanley D. 
Whitney; Councilman Walter V. Howe. 

President Murphy then presented prominent members 
and guests, which included former Chief William Stan- 
ford of Vallejo, now a resident of Los Angeles, but who 



wants to come back to the northern part of the state; 
former Chief Special Agent, Dan O'Connell, of the 
Southern Pacific; Chief Charles W. Dullea of San Fran- 
cisco; John Flor, City Judge of Larkspur; Sheriff Gleason 
of Alameda; Chief Robert T. Tracy of Oakland, Chief 
Special Agent J. L. Creighton, of the Standard Oil Co.; 
Chief Earl Dierking of Vallejo; William Schoeppe, 
National Auto Theft Bureau; District Attorney Charles 
J. McGoldrick of Santa Rosa; Nat Pieper, Chief Special 
Agent FBI.; Chief John D. Holstrom, new head of the 
Berkeley Police Department; Former Chief James T. 
Drew of Oakland; Attorney William P. Golden, San 
Francisco; Assistant Attorney General Jesse Hession, Sac- 
ramento; District Attorney Ralph Hoyt, Alameda County; 
Ed. H. Schoeppe, Hunters Point Drydock; Chief F. J. 
O'Ferrall, State Narcotics Division; Captain Lytton W. 
Hayes, Intelligence Division; and Captain H. L. Knowles, 
Fort Mason; Lieutenant W. W. Compton, U. S. Coast 




Captain Bernard McDonald 

Guard; Al Helgoes, American-Hawaiian Steamship Com- 
pany; Chief E. J. Foster, Sebastopol. 

Under the heading of committee reports. Deputy Sher- 
iff John Greening for the radio committee, reported that 
the Northern California Police Communication Officers 
Association's committee on codes was preparing a code 
system that was not yet completed but would have it fin- 
ished before the next meeting of the Bay Counties Asso- 
(Continued on page 46 ) 



Page 14 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



Feb 



ruary, 



J 94 5 



Panama Canal Zone Police 

Written for The Journal bv P. L. Dade. Actnig Press Representative 



A modern, efficient well-organized police force com- 
bining the best features of police departments in the 
United States with special requirements made necessary- 
by the exigencies of tropical service and the many unique 
situations arising in this part of the world, is found in the 
Canal Zone. The organization is completely free from any 
political influence, every advancement in rank is filled 
by competitive examination. At one time or another, ever>' 




Major A. O. Meyer. Chief of Police 

state in the Union has been represented on the Canal 
Zone force. 

This up-to-the-minutte organization has a territory' of 
roughly 500 square miles to patrol, including two large 
lakes, and two busy harbors, one on the Pacific terminal 
and one on the Atlantic. Included in this territory' are 
magnificent highways, woodland trails, mountains and 
swamps, and tropical jungles and rivers all bounded by a 
mighty ocean at each end and the Republic of Panama 
on both sides. There are about 60,000 civilians residing in 
the Canal Zone in several large towns and as many more 
small communities. The "law of the land," the Canal Zone 
Code, enacted by Congress of the United States, is based 
to a great extent on California State Statutes. 

For police administrative purposes, the Canal Zone is 
divided into two districts: the Atlantic (Cristobal) and the 
Pacific (Balbja). Each of these districts has its central 
station commanded by a Police Captain in charge as rank- 
ing officer, together with a staff of one Lieutenant, several 
Sergeants and first and second-class policemen. At each 
central station there is also one Captain of Detectives, 
each having his own "plain clothes" staff. 

Then there are seven sub-stations scattered across the 
Zone, each headed by either a Sergeant or a Lieutenant, 



depending on the size of the station. Police Headquarters 
are in the Administration Building, Balboa Heights. 

There is a traffic squad of motorcycle policemen and a 
roving squad of patrol cars. There are also harbor patrol 




General mspectxori in front o| the Balhoa Central Police Station 

launches for both Balboa and Cristobal and another for 
Gatun and Madden Lakes. These lakes, both artificial, 
and of tremendous size, practically border the Canal Zone- 
Republic of Panama boundaries, and require regular 
periodic check-up. 

The patrol cars and motor launches are equipped with 
two-way radio communication; the cars to Police Head- 
quarters and the two central stations, and the launches 
with the Port Captain's office. 

Besides regular police duties, the Canal Zone main- 
( Continued ori page 41 ) 




Ran)(ing ojjicers o) the Bdlboo. Police District, [n center li .Mujor 
Mever. On his left is Captain Carl Wani^e, Police Inspector. On 
Chiel's riglit IS Captain George Herman. Assistant Cliief of Police. 



Febr 



1945 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page IS 



ChieF of Police John D. Holstrom oF Berkeley 

He graduated under the old master, August (Gus) Vollmer, and he is \eepmg pace with his city's growth. 

By B. S. (Sandy) Sanders 



Veteran Police Reporter of the Post-Enquirer 



Until he came under the instruction of the "Old Mas- 
ter" young Jack Holstrom didn't know exactly what he 
wanted to follow as a career. 

The "Old Master" was none other than Berkeley's 
first Chief of Police and Former City Marshall, Prof. 
August Vollmer, who established the first police school 
at the University of California. 

But today John D. Holstrom, 3?, one of the youngest 




Chief John D. Holstrom of Berkeley 

police chiefs in the nation, heads the finely organized 
Berkeley Police Department. 

That first meeting with one of the nation's outstanding 
figures in police work was back in 1930 when Chief 
Holstrom was in his finishing years at the University of 
California. 

"I had majored in economics, I was interested in political 
science and then I enrolled in a course of police and peace 
officers' instruction under the Berkeley Police Chief 
August Vollmer. 

"It clicked and I said to myself 'I think I'll devote the 
next few years or so to police work and learn what it is 
all about'." 

Young Jack Holtsrom got his graduation certificate. He 
went straight to the "old maestro," Chief Gus Vollmer. 

"I'd like to be a police officer, sir," said Jack. 

And Chief Vollmer, who long had figured out that 
university men "make the best police officers," though he, 
himself, had never seen a university diploma, having come 
up the hard way, bad boy, letter carrier, town marshall, 
said: 

"Okeh, Jack, you're appointed." 



That was in 1931 when Chief Vollmer was still head 
of the Berkeley Police Department. Young Jack Hol- 
strom was a patrolman. 

Three years later, through civil service, he obtained the 
rank of sergeant — that was in 1934. 

In 1937 the young officer had again won a rank, that 
of lieutenant. 

And then Chief Vollmer stepped out and John A. 
Greening, recently retired after three decades of service, 
to become division chief deputy under Sheriff H. P. (Jack) 
Gleason, became Berkeley's Chief of Police. 

Greening and young Jack Holstrom, lieutenant, became 
close friends. 

When Chief Greening decided to retire, Berkeley's 
civil service board, following tradition, called for an open 
civil service examination for the office of chief. 

Five members of the local police departments and five 
outsiders took that examination. 

But Jack Holstrom headed the list and was duly ap- 
pointed Chief of Police by City Manager Geritt Vander 
Ende. 

That was on October 1, 1944, and since that time Chief 
Holstrom has been on the job twenty-four hours a day. 

Chief Holstrom is a modest chap. Questioned he only 
says: 

"After all there is nothing in my career that is spec- 
tacular. 

"I've only tried to be a good peace officer. 

"I think I am fortunate to have come under the under- 
standing instruction of Berkeley's first chief, August 
Vollmer. It was his simple, direct, understanding way of 
talking to us youngsters that inspired me to become a 
police officer . . . and I don't regret it." 

Chief Holstrom "shoots straight from the shoulder," 
and looks one squarely in the eye. He has the energy of 
youth and thinks and acts with understanding skill. 

The 89 regular patrolmen and officers under him say 
in consensus: 

"'We'll go all the way with Chief Holstrom, he's young 
hut he knows police work and he knows it inside and out." 

Chief Holstrom on the other hand is proud of his force 
which, in ordinary times, should comprise 10?. 

"You know," he said, "we have 40 of our younger 
fellows in the military service, army, navy, marine and 
merchant marine and coast guard, the majority hold com- 
missions. We're proud of those fellows, believe me. Two 
are lieutenant-commanders, one is a lieutenant colonel. 
We're looking for them to come back." 

Chief Holstrom is married to Marian and he has a son 
James, 5 years old, and the Holstrom family are happily 
domiciled at 2902 Benvenue Avenue, Berkeley. 



Page 16 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



February, 194S 



Inspector Butz Cracks Petrovich Murder 



On Saturday night, January 13, David Petrovich was 
killed in a grocery store he operated out in the Ingleside 
district, when he resisted an attempt to rob him of a large 
sum of money and war bonds. 

Two young fellows were seen leaving the store and 
getting into an automobile, at the wheel of which was 
a third young man. A few seconds after the car, which 




Inspector Harry Husted. head of Homtade Detail 

had its motor running while waiting for the would-be 
holdup youths, started up, Petrovich staggered out of 
the store and fell to the sidewalk with a bullet wound in 
his chest. He was dead when the ambulance crew from 
the Alemany Emergency Hospital arrived. 

This cold-blooder murder put into action every unit 
of the San Francisco Police Department, and there fol- 
lowed a fine example of how well the members of our 
city's enforcement o;cers have been trained to act in all 
instances of law breaking; how well each branch, as well 
as each individual, can be brought into the closest spirit 
of co-operation to solve a crime and bring to book the per- 
petrators of that crime. 

Scarcely h;id the news of that dastardly deed been 
flashed over the teletype and radio, when Chief Charles 
■W. Dullea and Captain of Inspectors Bernard McDonald 
swung into action. They hastened to the Hall of Justice 
and remained on duty unitl the early hours of Sunday 
morning, directing their men in solving the murder. 

Hundreds of Police Officers and Inspectors were called 
into the case and so swift were developments that in less 
than 36 hours the three youths who pulled this job that 
resulted in the death of Petrovich were in custody and 
confessions made by each one of them. 

To Inspector Fred But:, who during his membership 
in the San Francisco Police Department has turned up 
more hot leads and brought in more crooks than most any 
man you can name, belongs the credit for breaking the case. 



Inspector Butz has a faculty of making contacts, of 
getting a line on gangs and lone operators bent on com- 
mitting larcenies of any kind. He has been outstanding 
with the Robbery Detail headed by Lieutenant Daniel 
McKlem and he has a fine record as a former member of 
the Auto Detail. 

When the word was passed out that the car used in 
the robbery attempt and murder, and which was aband- 
oned a few blocks from the scene of the crime, had been 
stolen from the Union Square garage, Inspector Butz told 
Lieutenant McKlem and Inspector Harry Husted of the 
Homicide Detail that if they rounded up a number of 
youths, some who had been working in the garage and 
a couple of whom were still employed there, they would 
solve the murder. 

Lieutenant McKlim, Inspectors Husted, Frank Ahern, 
Ray O'Brien, Butz, Edward Murphy and Frank McCann 
got busy and with the aid of other members of the depart- 
ment began bringing m the fellows Inspector Butz had 
named. Five 'teen-aged youths were brought in, and two 
girls of juvenile age taken into custody and sent to the 
Juvenile Home. 

These five boys were picked up in the home of Ray 
Bastain, which seemed to be a hangout for a dangerous 
mob of youngsters who had decided crime was a quick 
way to get rich. Bastain it developed worked at the Union 
Square Garage, and he admitted after long questioning 
that he had turned the "murder" car over to the three 
youths, named Robert Chapman, 19; Robert Walker, 18; 
and Raymond Gray, 21. 

It wasn't long until these three young crooks were in 
handcuffs and taken to the Hall of Justice, where they 
were separated and a long seige of questioning started, 
which lasted all through Sunday night and until late Mon- 
day morning. All the above-mentioned Inspectors and 
Lieutenant McKlem stayed on the job until the last state- 
ment was taken, going without sleep for over 36 hours. 
District Attorney Edmund Brown took charge of the in- 
terrogation, and followed up this part in the solution of 
the brutal crime, by personally appearing in Municipal 
Court for the preliminary examination and in the Superior 
Court tor the arraignment which followed the holding to 
answer to the higher court. He took personal charge of 
the trial set before Judge William Traverso, and insisted 
that in the pleas of guilty to murder and robbery sentences 
run consecutively. This was the order of Judge Traverso 
and the trio of murderers were settled in San Quentin 1 1 
days after they had pulled their brutal job. 

In their statement the trio of bandits, two of whom 
had records of incarceration in Preston, Gray they re- 
counted had they decided to hold up Petrovich, because 
Walker who knew the groceryman, told his confederates 
that Petrovich always carried a big wad of money. (After 
he was shot the two youths who went in to hold him up, 
got scared when Gray fired a lone shot into the body 



Feb 



ruary, 



1945 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' TOURNAL 



Page 11 



of their victim, and left some $9,000 in war bonds and the sidewalk. Gray and Chapman leaped into the waiting 

cash behind them). car and they dashed off. But a young lad who lives in the 

They got the car from Bastain and then went out to the neighborhood and three girls saw them and gave a good 

grocer}' store. Walker remaining in the car for a getaway, description of the trio. 

because he would be recognized by Petrovich should he All three of the boys were charged with murder and 

take part in the holdup. Then the two others went into they went in to Superior Court, pleaded guilty, and all 

the back part of the store with Petrovich and told him were given life sentences. 






Inspector Ed\v.\rd Mlrphy 



Lieutenant D.\niel McKlem 



Inspector Fred Butz 








Inspector Ray O'Brien Inspector Frank McCann Inspector Frank Ahern 

These are the ^ast-woT\ing members of Inspectors Bureau who brought in the three young murderers of Dtifid Petrovich. 

it was a holdup. He grabbed an iron bar and started for In the meantime Inspector But;, Lieutenant McKlem, 

Gray who held the gun. Gray seeing he was about to get Inspectors Husted, Ahern, O'Brien, Murphy and McCann 

the iron bar, let loose a bullet from his pistol. It hit Pet- have been given lavish praise for their splendid solution of 

rovich in the chest and he staggered out of the store on this wanton murder. 



Phone BErkeley 5934 



Phone HIghgate 9774 Clarence Knight 

When It's So Hot the Trees Chase the Dogs 

PACIFIC COAST WHOLESALE CLEANERS NAVY JOES 

FOR CORRECT CLEANING DROP IN FOR A COOLING DRINK 

2500 SAN PABLO AVENUE BERKELEY, CALIF. 24 19 SAN PABLO AVENUE OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Page 18 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



February, 1945 



New S. F. Municipal Judges 



Harry J. Neuharth, former Assistant District Attor- 
ney, who was appointed to the Municipal court bench 
by Governor Earl Warren last January' 1, has been as- 
signed to the Traffic Court at the Hall of Justice. 

In his new assignment he finds many friends in the 
Police Department, made during the six years he had 




Judge Harry J. Newbarth. his Wife and Daughter 

charge of presenting criminal cases to the Grand Juries 
of that period. 

Judge Neuharth was horn m San Francisco 42 years 
ago. He attended the p,ublic schools of the city, graduating 
from Lowell High school after which he entered the 
University of California and got his degree to practice 
law from the Hastings College of Law. 

As a member of the firm of O'Connor, Neuharth and 
Moran he practiced law in this community for a num- 
ber of years. In 19.^8 he was made a niember of the staff 
of the then District Attorney Matthew Brady, and assigned 
to the Grand Jury, and was given charge of handling all 
matters that that body considers. In the presentation of 
criminal cases, emanating from the Police Department, 
he won many hearty endorsements from police officers 
and officials for the excellent manner he presented the 
evidence, which resulted in him getting a record per- 
centages of true bills returned. 

As judge of the Traffic Court he has given evidence of 
his complete co-operation with the Police Department 
in its never ending campaign to curb motor vehicle law vio- 
lations and cut down injuries and deaths. 

Judge Neuharth is married and he and his wife. Alma. 
have a nine year old daughter, Miss Sandra. 



We present some sidelights on our new Municipal 
Judge — Edward Molkenbuhr, who, in the first week 
in January, was assigned to the Hall of Justice. 

The records indicate that he was born in San Francisco 
opposite the Hearst Grammar School, where he received 
his first education. He then went to the old Edison School 




Judge Edward Molkenbuhr 

on Church Street, finally matriculating from Frank Mc- 
Coppin Grammar in the Richmond District. These same 
records indicate that he is married and the dad of two 
children. 

Some of the readers of this column will remember him 
from the days when he played basketball for St. Ignatius 
High School and St. Ignatius College and in the court in 
the old church at Hayes and Schrader. Others might re- 
member him from the days when he played for the Young 
Men's Institute and Olympic Club. It appears that basket- 
ball was his forte in his younger days. Then again, some 
might have crossed bats with him when he "chucked" 
for old S. I. and various semi-pro baseball clubs around 
the bay area during him college days. 

Those who know him of recent years have undoubted- 
ly met him through the American Legion, Knights of 
Columbus, Native Sons, Young Men's Institute or the 
Eagles. The daily papers divulge the information that ' 
the Judge has been chairman for over ten years of the 
annual Memorial exercises at the Presidio on Armistice 
Day for deceased veterans. Many of us know that he is 
now a member of the International Board of Directors 
of the Knights of Columbus and served as state head of 
that organization back in 1938. 

Still others might have met the new Judge through 
his two brothers, Val and Seamon, jewelers, who are 
known to many readers of these columns. 

All in all, the Judge is a real San Franciscan and knows 
his city. 



Feb 



ruary, 



J 945 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 19 



Dist. U. S. Secret Service Chief W. A. Merrill 



Chief William A, Merrill, who heads the United States 
Secret Service in the 14th District, which includes the 
states of California, Nevada and Arizona, and the Hawai- 
ian Islands, is no stranger to San Francisco. 

When he was selected to U. S. Director Frank J. Wil- 
son, to succeed Captain Thomas B. Foster, when he took 




I 



Chief Wm. A. Merrill, U. S. Secret Service 

his pension after 43 years of service with the U. S. Secret 
Service, Chief Merrill was stationed at Charlotte, North 
Carolina, and many law enforcement officers felt that a 
stranger was being brought in to fill Captain Foster's place. 
However, Chief Merrill started his work as an investigator 
with the Western Pacific Railroad, as a special agent in 
this city, and was with the railroad company from 1922, 
to November 1, 1928, when he entered the service of the 
government as a special agent for the Secret Service. 

Chief Merrill was born in Pocatello, Idaho, in 1901, 
but with his parents moved to Utah where the family 
lived until 1919, when they came to California, locating 
in Los Angeles. His first work was with the post office 
as a clerk, but he saw no future at that time in that line 
of work, so when an opportunity was offered he went to 
work for the Western Pacific. 

He worked up with the railroad and for a number of 
years was in charge of their office in Elko, Nevada, and 
while there one of his narrowest scapes from death oc- 
curred. He was on a train going from Elko to Salt Lake 
City, when he was handed a telegram at Wendover, 
Nevada, that the Western Pacific Hotel at that place had 
been robbed by two men and considerable loot taken from 
the rooms. 

Merrill asked the conductor if he had any men who got 
on at Wendover, and was told there were two in the 
smoking car ahead. Special Agent Merrill approached the 
two men indicated by the conductor and started question- 
ing them. He had not gotten very far along his interroga- 



tions until one of the men, later identified as Stanley Max- 
well Smith, pulled a .38 pistol from his pocket and sent 
four bullets through the officer's stomach. Injured as he 
was Merrill grabbed his assailant's gun and let him have 
four shots, and then getting his own pistol into action, sent 
three more shots into Mr. Smith. Smith's confederate, 
Clarence Helpin, made an effort to help his companion, 
and received a shot for his efforts from Merrill, who 
slipped the handcuffs on the pair and the train was speeded 
to Salt Lake City, where the injured men were hospital- 
ized. The men who were identified as the hotel robbers, 
were convicted. 

Agent Merrill spent seven months in the hospital re- 
covering from his serious wounds. He, nevertheless, was 
duly compensated for his narrow escape from death, for 
the young lady who nursed him back to health was Miss 
Ellen Benson, whom he later married. The couple have 
a daughter, Darlene, 16 years of age. 

He joined the Secret Service under Captain Foster, and 
was later transferred to Salt Lake City, where he re- 




At dedication of Boulder Dam, attended by President Roosevelt, 

left to right: the late Secretary Marvin Mclntyre. Merrill. Asst. 

V. S. Attorney Scott Mathewson of Utah, Special Agents Henry 

C. Taggart and Russell Wood. 

mained for seven years. Then he was made agent in 
charge in Minneapolis, where he remained until 1938, 
and held a similar position in Omaha, Nebraska, until 
1940. From Omaha he was returned to Salt Lake City, 
where he was in charge of U. S. Secret Service activities 
until 1942, when he was sent to Charlotte, and from there 
to his present assignment. 

While in Salt Lake City on his second stay he broke 
up a counterfeiting job that attracted much attention to 
his ability. There was a big photo engraving concern in 
Salt Lake City, and the guy that ran it figured he could 
make better bills than the Treasury' Department. So 
convinced was he of his ability that he started making ^-, 
10-, 20- and 50-dollar bills, which he started spreading. 
Being prominent in business and social circles he found 
I Continued on page 26 ) 



Page 20 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Fehr 



194? 



Chief F. J. OTcrrall of Narcotic Div. 



Illegal traffic in narcotics has called for national as well 
as state attention, resulting in laws being enacted to cope 
with this nefarious business. 

California is one of the first states to recognize that 
something should be done to curb the importing, manufac- 
ture and sale of opium, morphine, heroin and marihuana. 
Before the present war started the bulk of the first three 
drugs were brought in from Japan. That double dealing 




Chief F. J. 0'Ferr.\ll, State T^iarcotic Bureau 

race of humans had fostered the growth and production of 
these dangerous and tragic drugs. 

In 1914 when the national so'called Harrison Drug 
Act was enacted by Congress, the enforcement of the 
"State Poison Laws" were given over to the State Board 
of Pharmacy, which got along as best it could with its 
many other duties, until 1927, when the State Legislature 
passed the State Narcotic Act, which resulted in the 
formation of a Division of Narcotic Enforcement to work 
on the suppression and sale of narcotics. 

Now the Division of Narcotic Enforcement has been 
made a part of the Department of Justice, and placed 
under the direction of Attorney General Robert Kenny. 

Since the State has engaged in the suppression of nar- 
cotics it has had 13 chief enforcement officers. But it 
looks now as if the practice of making this important post 
a political football is over. For, about one of the first official 
acts of Governor Earl Warren when he took over the 
duties as chief state executive, was to appoint F. J. 
O'Ferrall, head of the Division of Narcotic Enforcement. 
who now enjoys civil service protection, and will not be 
ousted with a change of administration. 

Chief O'Ferrall has been engaged in this narcotic work 
since 1927, having started with the State Pharmacy Board, 
and in 1928, when the new Division was formed he was 
taken in with the rest of the personnel of the former 



board who had to do with narcotic investigations and 
prosecutions. 

He was made division inspection in due course of time 
and in 1934 was made chief inspector. 

Chief O'Ferrall was born south of Market Street and 
grew up in this city. After his grammar and high school 
education he went to the University of California, grad- 
uating from that institution in 1912. Then he took a post 
graduate course in St. Ignatius University and Santa Clara 
University, specializing in all three colleges on pharmacy 
and chemistry. Following his educational courses he en- 
gaged in the profession of pharmacy, but was soon at- 
tracted to enforcement work and joined up with the State 
Board and from there he has continually progressed. 
Today he is recognized as one of the foremost authorities 
on the various narcotics and of the laws enacted to combat 
them and the methods of getting the goods on that low 
type of humanity who gather millions of dollars from 
addicts. 

When Governor Warren appointed Joe OFcrrall to 
his present post he said, "There is no department of gov- 
ernment that should be administered more vigorously than 
the department which fights the traffic in narcotics." He 
seems to have appointed the right man to carry out this 
view. 

Chief O'Ferrall has H men under hmi now and has 
application for 10 more, sorely needed with the great in- 
flux of war workers into this state. This great migration of 
defense plants help has posed a problem for the Division 
of Narcotics as well as the operators of these plants The 



HAHN AND COMPANY, INC. 

CALVES 



350 SEVENTH STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone GArfield 4968 

DOW MFG. CO. 

SHIP SMITHYING — FORCINGS OF ALL KINDS — TANK WORK 

666 BRANNAN STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

GArfield 9244 

UNITED AMERICAN METALS 

CORPORATION OF CALIFORNIA 

785 BRYANT STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



T"1 EXbrook 0064 



Cable .Address "Havisideco" 



HAVISIDE COMPANY 

Established 1879 

Salvage and Derrick Barges — Ship Chandlers — Sail Makers 
Ship Riggers 



40 SPEAR STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



February, J 945 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 21 



records sent to the Division by the operators, run too 
heavily in men who have come afoul of the law for nar- 
cotic activities. 

Mexico is the source of most all opium smuggled into 
this country, and working with the Federal Narcotic Bu- 
reau, Chief O'Ferral and his force have snagged a lot of 
the drug, and owing to their vigilance the price of opium 
has soared to $450 for a five tael can against some $200 
previous to the war. 

With morphine and heroin unavailable, the use of 
marihuana has taken a big jump, not only in the amounts 
being used by addicts, but in price of this brain destroying 
drug. 

Previous to the war marihuana cigarettes containing 
from 11 to 15 grains of the deadly weed sold for 25 
cents apiece. Today cigarettes contain only three grains 
and retain for $1.00 each, quite a jump in price. 

Back in the early 30's Chief OTerrall successfully broke 
up a narcotic racket over in Oakland. A lady of doubtful 
reputation operated a so-called hospital, starting out in a 
small cottage, growing to a much larger set of flats and 
finally winding up with a 2 5 -room apartment place. Chief 
OTerrall and his men were attracted to this woman's 
place and after noting that there were no patients pat- 
ronizing the so-called hospital went to work to find out 
how come. 

Through one o{ his men he placed an order with the 
lady operator for two ounces of morphine to be delivered 
to a certain address. The lady made the delivery in per- 
son and handed the drug to OTerrall, who placed her 
under arrest and then started a search of her living quar- 
ters where a comparatively small amount of morphine 
was found. But in another house some distance from the 
first one, a search revealed 132 ounces packed in a steamer 
trunk. The lady was unable to explain this and did a 
stretch for having it and as a result of the clever work 
of OTerrall, traffic in drugs centering on this woman's 
place ceased for all time. 

Chief O'Ferrall works closely with county and city law 
enforcement officers and never breaks into a community 
without asking for assistance of the local authorities and 
he sees they get all the credit for breaking a case. 

He is married and he and his wife have two daughters, 
Barbara and Jane, and the family makes their home in San 
Francisco. 

Telephone MArket 6954 



EXbrook 9591 



Claude & Jean 



CAMEL CLUB 

Somethinsf Doing All The Time — Entertainment 

1034 KEARNY STREET 

Up the Hump from the International Settlement SAN FRANCISCO 



HEGGBLADE-MARGULEAS CO. 

FRUITS and VEGETABLES 
SHIPPERS, DISTRIBUTORS, EXPORTERS 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



HOTEL BELLEVUE 



GEARY at TAYLOR 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Invest Your Money in War Bonds 



PAY CASH AND SAVE AT 



WEINSTEIN CO 



1041 MARKET 615 MARKET 119 POST 100 MARKET 

1620 POLK STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



THE BEST FOR YOUR MONEY 



THE PURITY STORES, LTD. 



HEADQUARTERS: 
KEARNY & F'<ANCISCO STS. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



LUCKY STRIKE 

MEANS FINE TOBACCO 



FEDERAL MOGUL CORP. 



KUSTER LABORATORIES, LTD. 



250 14TH STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone UNderhiU 4310 



Established 1906 



571 SEVENTH STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 3, CALIF. 



OCEAN SHORE IRON WORKS 

BOILERS— NEW AND REBUILT— A COMPLETE STOCK 

We can quote on any size boiler, tank or other steam plant 
equipment. Repair and installations 



The Oscar Copper and Brass Works, Inc. 



550 EIGHTH STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



S. & K. TAVERN 



612 BRYANT STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 2327 SAN PABLO AVENUE 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



fage 22 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Feb 



ruary. 



1945 




The regular monthly meeting of the Northern Cali- 
fornia Police Communication Officers' Association was 
held Thursday. December 14th, 1944, at Robinhood Inn, 
Oakland, with J. D. Hossack acting as host at the lunch- 
con preceding the meeting. President Lewis called the 
meeting to order at 1 :40 p.m., and introduced the mem- 
bers and guests. The minutes were corrected and approved. 

Hossack reported for the Standard Code Committee. 
and submitted a list of twenty-five suggested standard 




NORTHERN CALIFORNIA 

POLICE COMMUNICATION OFFICERS 

ASSOCIATION 

Henry L. Bog.ardus, President 

J. D. Hoss.ACK, Secretary-Treasurer 

in handling plane crashes, which as shown by In- 
spector Ford is usually through the Highway Patrol, 
although contacts should be made with county police radio 
units as indicated by Lewis. A committee consisting of 
Ford. McMurphy, McKinney and Hossack was appointed 
to clarify this situation with Captain Hall and the Mili- 
tary' Police. 

Sergeant McKee reported progress in expediting infor- 
mation on car numbers. 

The Commercial members, Brunton. Deetken. Stancil 
and Becker commented briefly on the equipment avail- 
ability situation. It appears that there may be a gradual 
tightening again as a result of military demands. 

The request of Sheriff Johnson of Lassen County to 
operate two .^O-watt fixed stations on 39,500 kcs. in West- 
wood and Bieber, in order to establish communication 
between these two points and the main station at Susan- 
ville. will apparently not cause interference with existing 
systems in the area although approval of this set-up of 
course rests with the Federal Communications Commission. 

Charley Cross who took a swing through the North- 
west and visited a number of the Police radio units in that 
area told of the formation of the Northwest APCO Chap- 



WESTERN DIE CASTING CO. 

PRECISION DIE CASTING 

C. C. \'oglesong, Pres. 



Henry Bogardus. new President AiCPCOA 

code signals. Questions were asked and the matter dis- 
cussed by LeBoeuf. Barlich. Morgenthal, Lewis, Tudhope, 
McMurphy, Hippely and others. Greening suggested that 
it would be desirable to submit the code to the Bay Coun- 
ties' and Northern California Peace Officers' Associations, 
who are interested in the standard code matter and Stan- 
cil requested that a copy be sent to the Southern California 
group. Burton moved, seconded by Maybee, that the sug- 
gested code be approved, with final acceptance awaiting 
approval of the interested Peace Officers' groups, as re- 
quested. The motion carried. 

George Burton pointed out the futility of certain 
mis-sing persons broadcasts, and Hartnett discussed the 
use of Teletype for this service. 

McMurphy reported on the recent meeting with the 
Military Police authorities interested in covering Contra 
Costa and Alameda Counties, and Simpson indicated the 
laison between the Police and Military Police in the Mon- 
terey area. Captain Hall indicated the general procedure 



4065 MOLLIS STREET 



EMERYVILLE. CALIF. 



Phone TEmplebar 0568 



Mar\'in M. Branch. Prop. 



THE OMAR 

Fine Wines and Liquors - Beer and Sandwiches 
Jimie Dugan. Manager - Eddie Pizzorno. Bartender 



2086 BRO.ADWAY' 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone Piedmont 8543 



AMOS' 

FOR THAT FRlENDL-l' ATMOSPHERE 



53 19 GRO\E STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF 



Personal Optical Service 

A. R. FENNIMORE. Optometrist, at 
CALIFORNIA OPTICAL CO. 

EYES EXAMINED BY EXPERIENCED OPTOMETRISTS 
23 1 POST STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



February, 1945 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 23 



ter including Oregon, Washington and Idaho, as well as 
some Canadian units and we welcome these valuable addi- 
tions to the ranks of organized police radio. 

The following nominations for officers in NCPCOA 
were made at this meeting, to be voted on at the annual 
meeting in January: 

For President of NCPCOA— Harrington, nominated 
by Cross, withdrew. 
LeBoeuf, nominated by Cross. 
Watson, nominated by Maxey. 
Lewis, nominated by Wood. 
Bogardus, nominated by McKee. 
For Vice-President of NCPCOA— McKee, nominated 
by LeBoeuf. 
Simpson, nominated by Silva. 
Lindfeldt, nominated by Hossack. 
For Secretary-Treasurer of NCPCOA for 1945— 
Bogardus, nominated by Harrington. 
Taggart, nominated by McMurphy. 
For Directors of NCPOCA for 1945— Mergenthal, 
nominated by Maxey. 
Cross, nominated by Hossack. 
Maybee, nominated by McKee. 
Burton, nominated by McMurphy. 
Matjasich, nominated by LeBoeuf. 
McKinney, nominated by Silva. 
Simpson, nominated by Lindfeldt. 
Simpson indicated the existence of an interference sit- 
uation on 1674 kcs. which the organization felt can be 
properly adjusted by direct contact between the authori- 
ties in charge of the stations concerned and no action was 
taken by the group. 

McMurphy indicated the desirability of a certain fre- 
quency and a low-powered transmitter at various stations 
in the Bay Area for emergency communication. This 
will no doubt be something to consider for closer tie-in 
between stations. 

Chief Don Wood reminisced about old Oakland after 
which the group adjourned at 3:50 p.m. with the annual 
meeting in January scheduled for Piedmant with Ivan 
Hudson acting as mess sergeant. 

Active and Honorary Members Present 
James M. Lewis, Marin County, KSRC. 
J. D. Hossack, CHP, Bay Bridge, KRBU. 
Herbert Fairfield, Alameda, KOBR. 
Ivan Hudson, Piedmont, KQCP. 
Wm. V. Pflaum, Chief of Police, Piedmont. 
George V. Tudhope, Elec. Dept., Oakland, KALT. 
Homer Jones, Oakland, KALT. 
Manuel Trinta, San Mateo, KQDA. 
Charles E. Simpson, Monterey, KRLF. 
John J. Hartnett, Burlingame, KQCM. 
A. J. Ford, Supv. Insp., CHP., San Francisco. 
John Hinkel, CHP, Bay Bridge, KRBU. 
M. J. Barlich, Monterey, KQCO. 
John Wood, San Mateo County, KRGX. 
W. H. Harrington, San Mateo County, KRGX. 
Wm. L. Koch, State Forestry Dept. 
John K. Maybee. Sonoma County, KSRM. 



Henry L. Bogardus, San Francisco City and County, 

KGPD. 
Don T. Wood, Chief of Police, San Anselmo, KQBP. 
Herb Becker, Eimac. 
W. V. Stancil, Motorola, 
G. K. Burton, Contra Costa, KQCE. 
C. H. Cross, CHP, Bay Bridge, KRBU. 
Carroll Messier, Contra Costa County, KOCE. 
George W. Hippely, Dir. S.F.P.D., KGPD. 
A. J. Morgenthal, Oakland, KALT. 

A. R. Taggart, Oakland, KALT. 

B. McMurphy, Alameda County, KPDA. 
J. A. Greening, Alameda County, KPDA. 
Frank J. Matjasich, S.F.P.D., KGPD. 

E. W. Lindfeldt, Sacramento, KNGF. 
Mott Q. Brunton, F. M. Link. 

E. H. McKee, CHP-., Sacramento, KADJ. 
M. LeBoeuf, Marysville, KADS. 

Lloyd F. McKinney, Berkeley, KSW. 
A. J. Silva, CHP, Sacramento, KADJ. 
George S. Maxey, CHP, Bay Bridge, KRBU. 

F. I. Deetken, G. E. Co., San Francisco. 

Guests Present 
Ward L. Anderson, CHP, Bay Bridge, KRBU. 
J. A. Sykes, Petaluma, KQCY. 
Captain L. L, Hall, USA. 
L. A. Schallabarger, Oakland, P. D. 
L. H. Sower, Elec. Dept., Oakland. 

January Meeting 
The regular monthly meeting of the NCPCOA was 
held Thursday, January 11th, at the Claremont Hotel on 
the Berkeley-Oakland line. Ivan Hudson acted as Host at 
the luncheon. The meeting was brought to order at 1:45 
p.m. by President Lewis and introduction of members and 
guests followed. The minutes of the previous monthly 
meeting were read by Sec. Henry Bogardus and were 
approved as read. 

A. D. SCHADER 

144 SPEAR STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

C. E. lAMIESON & CO. 

MANUFACTURING CHEMISTS 



383 BRANNAN STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone YUkon 2<)05 

LANTERN FOOD PRODUCTS CO. 

SOY SAUCE MANUFACTURERS 

246 FRONT STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone Mission 4914 

SO SAN FRANCISCO TALLOW WORKS 

1420 EVANS AVENUE SAN FRANCISCO 

WESTERN SHIP SERVICE 

178 FREMONT STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



Page 24 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Feb 



ruary, 



1945 



Bogardus then submitted the yearly report and financial 
statement for the year 1944. 

A. J. Silva, acting in the absence of McKee, made a 
report regarding changes in the present radio car numbers 
used by the Cahfornia Highway Patrol which are causing 
some confusion. The matter was discussed by Lewis, Bur- 
ton, McMurphy, Hossack and Tudhope. As no conclusion 
was reached Lewis recommended the matter be given 
further study and consideration. 

Geo. Burton speaking for the Sheriff of Napa Coun- 
ty requested a series of car numbers for the Napa County 
radio cars. The series of 100 to 199 was approved by 
Maybee and Levv'is who will share the 1610 kc. frequency 
with Napa County. 

McMurphy reported on the contacts with the Military 
Police in connection with their radio coverage of Alameda 
and Contra Costa Counties. 

Jack Greening reported on the Bay Counties' PeJice 
Officers' interest in the proposed standard code and re- 
quested a meeting between a committee from the NCP- 
COA and the Bay Counties' Peace Officers' Association 
committee on January 24th. Lewis suggested that the code 
committee: McKinney, Hossack and Hudson attend the 
above meeting to present the proposed standard code. 

The Peddlers' Committee reported no progress. 

Dan Hewitt of Menlo Park was voted in as a regular 
member. Hewitt is connected with KRGX, Redwood City. 

John Maybee nominated Sheriff Patterson as honorary 
member which was passed. 

Election of Officers was next in order. The following 
nominations and withdrawals were made in addition to 
those reported in last month's minutes. Watson and Lewis 
withdrew as presidential nominees. Bogardus withdrew as 
Secretary-Treasurer nominee. Chares Simpson withdrew 
as Vice-President, nominee. McMurphy nominated for 
Secretary-Treasurer, withdrew. Hossack, nominated for 
Secretary-Treasurer by Ivan Hudson. 

While the voting was in progress Simpson reported 
that the interference situation on 1674 kc, in Monterey, 
Santa Cruz and San Benito Counties has been cleared up 
to everyone's satisfaction. 

George Burton spoke on keeping a radio log during a 
disaster. He suggested that a shorthand expert be on call 
to take up station in the radio dispatching room during 
the period of heavy traffic at such time. In this manner 
a complete record of everything said during the radio 
transmissions could be made a matter of record. 

Chief Wood spoke briefly on a couple of interesting 
subjects. 



LAkehurst 3-1133 



DIME TAXI 

KNOW YOUR RATES 

Avoid Accidents by Using Our Cabs 



Phone LAkehurst 2-9887 

THE 

ALAMEDA BOWL 

"BOWL FOR YOUR HEALTH" 

24 18 SANTA CLARA AVE., near Park St. 



ALAMEDA. CAL. 



LAkehurst 2-9904 



LAkehurst 2-9905 



PARK ST. GARAGE 



1600 PARK STREET 



ALAMEDA, CALIF. 



Phone LA 2-0696 



JOSE TOTORICA 

PARTY FOOD PRODUCTS CO. 



POTATO CHIPS 
Fresh - Taste - Quality 



23 18 CLEMENT 



ALAMEDA, CALIF. 



LAkehurst 2-6622 



LADY ESTHER'S PASTRY SHOPS 



Robert Petersen. Proprietor 



330 FOURTEENTH ST. 
OAKLAND, CALIF. 



14094 PARK STREET 
ALAMEDA, CALIF. 



Phone LA 2-9982 



Al La Franco, Prop. 



D - DAY CLUB 



LIQUOR OFF SALE— ALL KINDS OF LIQUOR AT BAR 
COCKTAILS 



1901 PARK STREET 



ALAMEDA, CALIF. 



Eva Williams 



GENERAL CAFE 

If you want to eat three good meals a day go to Eva Williams. 
The best Home Cooked Food at reasonable prices. 



192 1 CHESTNUT STREET 



.ALAMEDA. CALIF. 



ALAMEDA DISTRIBUTORS 



COMPLETE JANITORIAL SUPPLIES 



1926 EVERETT STREET 



ALAMEDA, CALIF. 



Peter Makus. Prop. 



STEP INN CLUB 

ALL KIND OF GOOD LIQUORS 
Good Service Under New Management 



13 13 PARK STREET 



ALAMEDA. CALIF. 



Phone GLencourt 3636 

VICKS DISTRIBUTING CO. 

Finest Domestic and Imported 
WINES AND LIQUORS 

234 1 S.AN PABLO AVENUE O.AKLAND, CALIF. 



February. 1945 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL Page 2? 

The final results of the balloting were as follows: 

Henry Bogardus, president 19 votes 

E. H. McKee, vice-president 14 votes L^^p Lumber and Mill Company 

Donald Hossack, secretary-treasurer 13 votes 

BROADWAY AT THE ESTUARY 

Directors 

o T3 ^ 1 ■ Tr, t ALAMEDA, CALIF. 

George Burton, chairman 20 votes 

Chas. Simpson 14 votes 

John Maybee 12 votes 

Lloyd McKinney 9 votes 

Jim Lewis thanked the members for their co-operation FT? AMT^'^s POT T FCF TMIST 

during the past year and turned the meeting over to the 
new president, Mr. Bogardus. 

Herb Becker requested the next meeting be at night at 5943 ^.an pablo ave. Oakland, calif, 

the Eimac tube plant in San Bruno. His offer was promptly 

accepted. 

Active and Honorary Members Present _,^,_, r^^nr-.^-rr^r' 

1 -KA J ■ ^A ■ n . i-cDo THE FIRESIDE 

J. M. Lewis, Mann County, KSRC. 

W. V. Pflaum, Chief of Police, Piedmont. cocktail lounge 

Ivan Hudson, Piedmont, KQCP. 

John K. Maybee, Sonoma County, KSRM. i-isj webster street alameda, calif. 

Harry L. Patterson, Sheriff Sonoma County. 

G. V. Tudhope, Oakland Elect. Dept., KALT. 

C. H. Cross, CHP Bay Bridge, KRBU. 

J. D. Hossack, CHP Bay Bridge, KRBU. W. F. STONE AND SON 

Lloyd F. McKinney, Berkeley, KSW. 

A. J. Morgenthal, Oakland, KALT. ^, , ^ ^^^^^,^^ ^^^ ■ ^^^^^^^ ^^^,^ 

Al. Taggart, Oakland, KALT. 

W. J, Winsom, Chief of Police, Hillsborough, KSPH. 

Manuel Trinta, San Mateo, KQDA. 

Merrill LeBoeuf Sutter-Yub^a County, KADS. TOBIAS AND COMPANY 

Homer Jones, Elect. Dept., KALT. 

B. McMurphy, Alameda County, KPDA. alameda, California 
Herb Watson, Richmond, KRLW. 

Geo. Burton, Contra Costa County, KQCE. 

Henry Bogardus, Dept. of Elect., San Francisco, KGPD. J°= sobek 

J. A. Greening, Alameda Co. Sheriff's Office, KPDA. 

Donald T. Wood, Chief of Police, San Anselmo, KQBP. TAVERN 

Charles Simpson, Monterey, KRLF. The Best of Liquors and Sandwiches 

Jim M. Ruys, Alameda County, KPDA. ^""^ °« ^"'^ "-'"""^ °' ^" "^'"'^ 

Carrol Messier, Contra Costa County, KQCE. ,540 market street Oakland, calif. 

Herb Becker, Eimac. ■ 

Hank Brown, Eimac. 

Frank Matjasich, San Francisco, KGPD. 

Geo. W. Hippley, San Francisco, KGPD. GOLDEN WEST MEAT CO. 

Mott Q. Brunton, Link. Emeryville, calif. 

E. S. Naschke, CHP, Sacramento, KADJ. 

A. J. Silva, CHP, Sacramento, KADJ. 

W. F. Koch, State Forestry. Phone piedmont 9588 

E. W. Lindfeldt, Sacramento, KNGF. 

,oh„ ™„kel, CHP B.V Bridge, KRBU. ^^^^^^^ TRAILER VILLAGE 

Guests Present 

T-xT^r,iiT-»/->iciT^i-^ A Clean, Fine Trailer Court For Particular People 

D. D, bmalley, P, G. fer E. Co. 

E. C. Wood, P. G. fe? E. Co. 

„ „ T tr TT 1 Ti 1- 3246 SAN PABLO AVE. OAKLAND, CALIF, 

Geo, W. Hanson, Piedmont Police. 

John J. Gartner, Deputy Chief of Police, BurHngame. p*>°"= "^Eiiog 4.0143 

Ward L. Anderson, CHP Bay Bridge, KRBU. OAKLAND EXCLUSIVE DYERS 

J. D. Hossack wholesale dyeing a specialty 

Secretary-Treasurer ' I 64 7.A e. fourteenth street Oakland, calif. 



Page 26 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Fehniary, J 94 5 



CHIEF MERRILL 

(Continued from page 19) 
it easy to get rid of his spurious currency, hut he got to 
spreading the bills so much that Agent Merrill finally 
landed him, when he gave a bootlegging bell hop a $50 
dollar bill for a bottle of boo;e and waited for the bell 
hop to go out and get it changed. The bell hop was grab- 
bed by Merrill who returned to the hotel where the photo 
engraving man was awaiting. He didn't have to wait much 
longer for a patrol wagon to back up and haul him to jail, 
and later was sent to the Federal Penitentiary for 15 years. 
Agent Merrill found $35,000 of the phoney bills hidden 
in the arrested man's automobile and $68,000 more clev 
erly hidden in two automobile tires. 

During his term with the Secret Service, Chief Merrill 
has been called upon for extraordinary duties in Wash- 
ington, D. C, and New York. Just prior to Pearl Harbor's 
Jap sneak he was brought to the National Capitol to take 
over the protective detail assigned to Lord Beaverbrook 
of England, during his visit to this country. In 1938 he 
spent five months in New York on a special detail. 

At the ceremonies throwing open the Boulder Dam, 
at which President Roosevelt was present, he was made 
a part of the detail assigned to guard the President and 
the presidential party. 

Chief Merrill has 31 men working for him throughout 
the Fourteenth District, and with the increased duties 
caused by the war he has continued to do the swell job 
his predecessor and crew carried on for so many years. 
He says that counterfeiting of U. S. money has decreased 
but stealing and forging of government checks has in- 
creased greatly, owing to the many people engaged on 
Federal jobs. 

He pays high tribute to the co-operation accorded his 
department by the State, county and city peace ofiicers 
throughout his vast district. Especially does he praise In- 
spectors Allen McGinn and William McMahon, assigned 
by Chief Charles W. Dullea to the local headquarters 
of the Secret Service. 

Compliments of 

JAMES J. GARTLAND 

SUPERVISOR 



PRospect 2400 



CASH FOR USED CARS 

JAMES w. McAllister, inc. 



Phone BErkeley 893 7 



James (Jimmie) H. Edwards, Owner 



HEATH'S CREAMERY FOUNTAIN 



BAR-B-Q SANDWICHES & SODA FOUNTAIN 

Phone BErkeley 9414 

JACK LeSTRANGE'S 

Where Friends Meet 
COCKTAILS AND ALL KINDS OF GOOD LIQUORS 



1084 UNIVERSITY AVE. 



BERKELEY, CALIF. 



THE FRUITVALE TOGGERY 

APPAREL FOR WOMEN AND CHILDREN 

Open Thursday Nights to 9 o'Clock 



EAST 14lh ST. at 38th AVE. 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



BErkeley 8656 



PAY'N SAVE MARKET 

GRADE A MEATS — GROCERIES — FRESH VEGETABLES 
WINE & BEER 



2353 SAN PABLO AVE. 



BERKELEY. CALIF. 



NEW ART ROOFING CO. 



1307-1311 FRUITVALE AVE. 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



LAndscape 5-9945 



Mel Cuisto - Joe DeMartini 



MEL-O-DEE CLUB 



98 7 SAN PABLO AVE. 



ALBANY. CALIF. 



Phone LAndscape 5-9907 



Tanya Luna, Manager 



CHATEAU TANYA 

A FINE PLACE — DINNER RESERVATIONS 



POST AT VAN NESS 



SAN FRANCISCO 



905 SAN PABLO AVE. 



ALBANY, CALIF. 




RHODES & JAMIESON, LTD. ADMIRALTY MANUFACTURING CO 

iMrnRpnR ATPn 



COAL, WOOD, FURNACE OIL, BUILDING MATERIAL 

FOOT OF 23rd AVENUE KEllog 3-5225 744-750 TWENTY-THIRD AVE 



INCORPORATED 
FLAMEPROOFING PAINTS AND SOLUTIONS 



OAKLAND 6, CALIF. 



February, 1945 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 27 



CHIEF DULLEA CHIEF FOR FIVE YEARS 

( Contiriued from page 6 ) 

worked until their assignments were completed without 
watching the clock. 

Chief Dullea was appointed during the administration 
of former Mayor Angelo J. Rossi. When Mayor Roger 
D. Lapham took over the job as chief executive his new 
commissioners, Jerd Sullivan, J. Wesley Howell and E. L. 
Turkington, kept him on the job. They have a precedent 
for so doing, for the late Mayor James Rolph retained the 
late Chief D. A. White, who was appointed by a pre- 
ceding administration. 

San Francisco is a well policed city; it has a fine well- 
trained Police Department and is headed by a Chief 
that is recognized for his ability throughout the country. 



GALLENKAMP'S 

SHOES FOR THE ENTIRE FAMILY 
MORE MILES TO A G.ALLENKAMP 



Compliments of 



UNION OIL COMPANY 



OF CALIFORNIA 



GRAZER'S 

CIGARS - TOBACCOS - FOUNTAIN SERVICE 



2689 FRUITVALE AVE. 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



PACIFIC TANK 8C PIPE CO. 

The Standard Since 1888 
Manufacturers and General Contractors 



LAWRENCE WAREHOUSE CO. 

FIELD WAREHOUSING 



37 DRUMM STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Phones ANdover 2004 - ANdover 6536 



Thos. P. Hester, Prop. 



AMERICAN SEWER SERVICE 

SEWERS - DRAINS - SEPTIC TANKS - RETAINING WALLS and 

Bulk Heads - Cement Work, Sidewalks, Patios - Compressors 

Mud Pumps - Dump Trucks for Rent 



1202 54th AVENUE 



OAKLAND I. CALIF. 



4821 TIDEWATER AVE. 



OAKLAND, CALIF. '<-E"°S "•"" 



Robert L. Lambert 



J. M. RICH 

PAINT AND VARNISH CO., INC. 



PRODUCTION PATTERN SHOP 

WOOD AND METAL PATTERNS 

4244 EAST TWELFTH ST. OAKLAND 1. CALIF. 



4416 CLEMENT STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF. Telephone KEllog 2-9270 



Under new management 



ANdover 5934 

PACIFIC FORGE 8c MFG. CO. 

SPECIAL UPSET - DROP & SMALL HAMMER FORGINGS 

3010 ELMWOOD AVE. OAKLAND. CALIF. 

Phone KEUog 22770 

Contra Costra Laundry 8C Dry Cleaners 



RONDEVU 

CHOWDER - TURKEY SANDWICHES 
Dancing Every Night - Hawaiian Music 



3962 E. 14th STREET. Cor 40th Ave. 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone ANdover 6659 



A. J. Rog.T 



ROGER MFG. CO. 

Designing - Developing - Manufacturing - Plastic Molding 

Mechanical & Electrical Devices 

Tools - Dies - Stampings - Screw Mach'ne Products 



52 7 23rd AVENUE 



OAKLAND 6. CALIF. 



5200 EAST 12th STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



VULCAN FOUNDRY CO. 

IRON AND STEEL 



PACIFIC BOX COMPANY 

GENERAL OFFICES 



k 



4401 SAN LEANDRO BLVD.. OAKLAND 



2934 FORD ST. 4901 TIDEWATER AVE. 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Page 28 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



February, 1945 



BAY CITIES BUSINESS DIRECTORY 



Granucci's - O. Baldacci dC Co. 

Grocery Dept. Grand Market Meat Dept. 

Fruits - Vegetables - Choice Meats 
15 75 Leavenworth Street San Francisco 

Phone ORdway 4058 Hours 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. 

ANNA L. CARLSON 

Massage Salon for Women 

1476 California Street San Francisco 

Phones: ORdway 3070-5171 

M. A. POLLARD 8C CO. 

Coin Operated Amusement Machines 

725 Larkin Street San Francisco 



Pho 



VAle 



4727 



Trinidad Villaban 



MI RANCHO GROCERY 



Tortillas, Tamales and Chorizos 
Servicio a Domicillo 

335 1 20th Street San Francisco 



Phone HEmlock 9449 



Ernest Kopp 



THE HAPPY OLD CORNER 

Specializing in Sandwiches 

1 7th and Capp Streets San Francisco 

Ph. UNderhiU 5891 Cash & Carry, Delivery 

DROHER COAL CO. 

Quality Coals, All Kinds, B-g Savings 
Milorganite, the ideal Fertilizer 

133 1 Folsom Street San Francisco 



Price Building Specialties Co. 



3 5 Gilbert Street 



San Francisco 



Compliments of 

Alhambra 5c 8C 10c Store 

2246 Polk Street San Francisco 

California Savings and Loan Co. 



673 Market Street 



San Francisco 



CALIFORNIA FILTER CO. 



HOME COFFEE SHOP 

Under New Management 
604 6th St. San Francisco 

GEORGE G. OLSHAUSEN 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 

1303 Mills Tower 

Phone EXbrook 2503 San Francisco 

MOntrose 05 16 M. F. Conklin. Mgr. 

KOENIG LUMBER CO. 

LUMBER — PLYWOOD — MOULDINGS 

1701-09 Judah. at 22ncl Ave., San Francisco 

Phone SUtter 9838 C. Giannini 

COLOMBO MARKET GRILL 



626 Front Street 



San Francisco 



Phone DOuglas 9855 Charlie Dahlstrom 

SPOKANE INN 

Lunch with Beer - Imported Liquors, Wines 

348 Drumm Street San Francisco 

JACK FORBES' PANTRY 

I 72 Fourth Street San Francisco 

Metz Cream Doughnut Shop 



2778 24th Street 



San Francisco 



Compliments of 

JOE JUDNICK'S INN 



590 San Bruno 



San Francisco 



HOTEL DALE 

Reasonable Rates - Private Bath 
649 Jones Street San Francisco 

LAkehurst 2-1494 



Wm. Jackson 



JACKSON PATTERN WORKS 



981 Folsom Street 



San Francisco 2056 Clement Avenue 



Alameda, Calif. 



Phone VAlencia 792 2 

New China Herb Co. 

2331 Mission St., near 19th San Francisco 
Ph. DElaware 5644 Res. ELkridge 1455 

Mission Bedding 8C Upholstering Co. 

Mattresses Renovated — Chesterfields and 
Chairs Recovered and Modernized 

4727 Mission Street San Francisco 



Phone ANdover 2346 

CALIFORNIA FURNACE CO. 



1276 48th Ave. 
Just off E. 14th St. 



Oakland, Calif. 



JEAN BART &. CO. 



699 Second Street 



San Francisco 



Phone MArket 9367 

TOPOLOS BROS. 

Automotive Service 

Page, Franklin, at Market St. San Francisco 

Phone ^'Ukon 0340 P. O. 2 143 

GENERAL FISH CO. 

producers - Wholesalers 

533 Washington Street San Francisco 

Phone UNderhiU 9366 

DICKOFF BROS. 

Beer - Wines - Liquors 

1776 Mission Street San Francisco 

DOuglas 1344 Established 1884 

E . F . T W A Y 

SHIPSMITH 

227 MAIN ST. San Francisco 

HEmlock 2676-2677 Fluorescent Lamps 

W. B. BAKER & CO. 

Electrical Contractors 

I I 12 Mission St. San Francisco 

Phone 500 

SAVIN'S DRUG STORE 

(Sav-in-Drugs) 

4th and Macdonald Ave. Richmond, Calif. 

Phone Richmond i92-J 

FINNISH STEAM BATHS 

Massage "for your health" 

Week Days: 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. 
515 Tenth Street Richmond, Calif. 

THE CALIFORNIA 

Bottled Beer - Bottled and Bulk Wines 
Cigars - Cigarettes 

17 16 Macdonald Avenue Richmond, Calif. 

Phone Richmond 404 



Larkin Smith, Mgr. 

WESTERN AUTO STORES 

Stores All Over the West 

132 7 Macdonald Avenue Richmond, Calif. 

Telephone Richmond 4 7 7 

E . C . CRANE 

Window Shades - Venetian Blinds 
Linoleum 

2011 Macdonald Acenue Richmond, Calif. 

Compliments of 

HERMANN SAFE CO. 



Howard and Main Streets 



San Francisco 



Phone UNderhiU 9145 



Archie & Frank's 



201 VAN NESS SOUTH 

where Courtesy and Friendship Prevail 

I 3 th and Howard Streets San Francisco 



Phone MArket 1711 



Established IB85 



A. Quandt Phone VAlencia 6156 



A. QUANDT & SONS 

Fainter and Decorators 
3 74 GUERRERO STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone MArket 29 10 

BETTER VALUE MARKET 

Groceries, Fruites and Vegetables 
COR. 18th and CONNECTICUT SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone LAndscape 5-6971 



I. J. Clickman 



SAFREN WOOL STOCK CO. 



Woolen and Paper Mill Supplies 



800 MINNESOTA STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone Mission 4970 



SMITH MARKET 



900 22nd STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phil Molino - Henry Molino Phone SUtter 742 7 



CLUB KON A 

DANCING - DINING - ENTERTAINMENT 

303 SAN PABLO AVENUE EL CERRITO. CALIF. 



TLOH FOOD SHOP 

To Please You. an Ambition - Making Friends Our Religion 
240 CALIFORNIA STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



Jackie Quent - We Grease to Please - Lubrication, Tires. Accessories Phone DOuglas 5122 



MARTIN'S TOTEM POLE SERVICE 

SERVICE WITH A SMILE 

White Gas 

1008 SAN PABLO AVENUE EL CERRITO CALIF 



268 MARKET STREET 



COOK & HARMS 

Manufacturers Agents and Brokers 
FOOD PRODUCTS 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Februar\, 1945 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 29 



Sheriff Long^s Clever Work Gets Murderer 



Two-way radio which was introduced in poHce work 
in this part of the state for the entire nation, has been de- 
veloped into one of the most potent agencies for the de- 
tection and apprehension of criminals. It has brought into 
closer co-operation the various law enforcement agencies. 
In a split second peace officers throughout the State can 
be apprised of a crime and given a description of the sus- 
pect, means of escape, the number of the auto license if 
an automobile was used in' fleeing the scene of a crime, 
and instantly there will be thrown into action a large force 
of trained men to get the law violator. 

Daily there are instances throughout this State of how 
well and fast two-way radio is operating. One instance oc- 
curred last December which is worth recounting. 

Sheriff James N. Long, the efficient Sheriff of Contra 
Costa County, had a murder on his hands. Mrs. Margaret 
Faria, wife of a farmer who had a ranch a mile from 
Rodeo, called up Sheriff Long and said one of their em- 
ployees on the ranch had phoned and told her about an 
accident on the farm. Mrs. Faria asked the Sheriff to in- 
vestigate. He did and found the body of an itinerant, with 
the head hacked off, and the body crammed into an out- 
house. 

The sheriff went to the Faria home to report his ghastly 
finding, and was informed by Mrs. Faria that the man, 
whose name was Eugene Justi had phoned again. 

This tipped off the sheriff that he had a man with a 
telephone complex to deal with, and told the wife of the 
farmer Justi would call again. He told her to hold the man 
when he phoned again. Then the sheriff made arrange- 
ments with the telephone company to have all calls to the 
Faria home traced, and then he sent for a State Highway 
Patrol car, with two-way radio. It was Sheriff Long's plan 
to have the word broadcast by the Highway Patrol car, 
telling from where the suspect was telephoning. It worked 
out just as the sheriff had planned, and Justi put in the 
third call. Instantly the phone operators got busy and 
found it came from a pay station in Oakland, the Patrol 
Car broadcast the location and the Oakland Police De- 
partment's two-way equipped cars picked up the word. 
They rushed a car to the pay station but missed their 
man by a few seconds. Then the sheriff had to wait for 
another call, which he was sure would be made, and it 
was made. This time it was from a pay station in the 
Bridge Terminal in San Francisco. Mrs. Faria was clever, 
she kept the man on the phone under various pretexts 
while the word was being flashed to the San Francisco po- 
lice. She worked so well in carrying out Sheriff Long's 
plans that Rudy Kopfer and Lloyd Kelly, Inspectors from 
the night shift of the Inspectors' Bureau swooped down 
on Justi while he was still talking to Mrs. Faria. 

Justi was identified as an army deserter, having been 
working on the Faria ranch since last may. His victim 
was identified as Francisco Cincerchia, of Providence, R. I. 

According to Justi's story to Sheriff Long, he and Cicer- 



chia had gotten drunk, had a quarrel and then he knocked 
the latter out and got a beet topping knife, razor sharp, 
and cut off his head. He then changed his blood-bespattered 
clothes for the dead man's; took $20 from him and went 
from there, and took up his telephoning spree that re- 
sulted in his arrest. 



LAkehurst 2-5215 



.A. J. (.Andy) Cassani 



ANDY'S AUTO SERVICE 

Fender, Body and Reconstruction Work — Radiators Cleaned 
and Repaired — Acetylene Welding — Auto Painting 



2429 LINCOLN AVE. 



ALAMEDA. CALIF. 




Phone GLencourl 3 722 



Roger H. Guichard 



CAPITOL MACHINE WORKS 

MACHINISTS - BRASS MANUFACTURERS 



424 SEVENTH STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



MODERN CAFE 



427 12th STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



ROXIE Tlieatre 

4th Hit Week! 

•A SONG TO REMEMBER" 

In Technicolor With 

PAUL MUNI 

MERLE OBERON 

CORNEL WILDE 



ESQUIRE Theatre 

OPEN ALL NIGHT 

Now Playing: 

HUMPHREY BOGART 

LAUREN BACALL 

In Ernest Heminway's 

"TO HAVE AND HAVE NOT" 

. . . also . . . 

"Tahiti Nights" - Jinx Falkenburg 



AMERICAN DREDGING CO. 



O.AKLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



Established 1852 



EHRMAN BROS., HORN 8C CO. 

Importers and Wholesalers - Wines and Liquors 
360 SIXTH STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



Page 30 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



February, 194 J 



SAFE-CRACKERS CAGED 

For a few weeks there was an epidemic of safe-crack- 
ing in this city. In fact two score business places were 
entered and the safes broken into and large amounts of 
cash taken from them. 



On the night of January 15 they brought in four men 
and two women, who were occupying an apartment on 
Seventeenth Street. 

Those taken into custody were Robert Barbour, 32, a 
five time loser; Otis Westerman, 30; Count W. Vier, 32, 





Inspector George Dyer 



Inspector George Pace 



All these jobs were evidently the work of a mob of 
experienced operators, and Captain of Inspectors McDon- 
ald had every man he could spare working on the many 
kicks. 

It fell to the lot of two members of the General Works 
Detail to stop these depredations. These two members were 
Inspectors George Page and George Dyer, who have the 
reputation of turning in a good job on any assignment 
they may be given. 

Phone WEst 082 8 

Pierce-Rodolph Storage Co., Ltd. 

Storage, Moving, Packing, and Shipping 
1450 EDDY STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone EXbrook 784 I 

WEBER 8C CO. 

INDUSTRIAL - CONSTRUCTION 
Railway & Mining Equipment & Supplies 

115 NEW MONTGOMERY STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

H. V. CARTER CO., INC. 

Farm and Garden Equipment - Insecticides - Fertilizers 
52 BEALE STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone DOuglas 9352 Phone GArfield OS'S I 

KNOWN FOR GOOD FOOD 

V ANESSI'5 

'*A Glimpse of Old Venice" 
498 BROADWAY at KEARNY SAN FRANCISCO 

Phones RAndolph 8535 - 8536 

BORELLO'S CLEANING & DYEING CO. 

CLEANERS OF QUALITY 

2695 SAN BRUNO AVENUE SAN FRANCISCO 



these were all booked on suspicion of burglary, and the 
first named for violating the gun law; Joseph Bruni and 
the wives of Westerman and Barbour, who were held for 
investigation. 

In the Seventeenth Street apartment Inspectors Page 
and Dyer found loaded revolvers, and burglar tools such 
as were used in the many safe robberies. The first three 
named men under arrest are all from Utah, where they 
have done time for burglaries. 

Compliments 

GOLDEN WEST GARAGE 



3556 SACRAMENTO STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



EXbrook 29 10 Emil Lamedin 

THE CRAFTSMAN PRESS 



340 FIRST STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



UNderhill 3950 

HARRY McCUNE SOUND SERVICE 



RENTAL 



SERVICE 



10 BRADY STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone UNderhill 6345 

W. A. HERSCH 

OFFICE SUPPLY SERVICE 
PRINTING — RUBBER STAMPS 

1127 FOLSOM STREET SAN FRANCISCO 3 



Phone PRospect 9860 



A] La Rocca 



Leo La Rocca 



"This Is It" 

LA ROCCA'S CORNER 



95 7 COLUMBUS AVENUE 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Febniarv, 1945 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 31 



POLICE COMMISSIONERS 

(Continued from page 4) 

the Crocker National Bank, he has given unstintingly 
of his time and talents to his added duties as commis- 
sioner. Born, reared and educated in San Francisco, he 
knows this city as only a native San Franciscan knows it. 
He has a deep loyalty for the city's interests and he has 
displayed marked ability in mastering the details of the 
municipal office he now holds. 

Commissioner Howell has for years been general man- 
ager for the Hazlett Warehouse Company. Though not 
a native of San Francisco, as an adopted son, he yields 
to no native for interest in the city's welfare. He is a 
graduate from the Stanford Law School, and his early 
legal college training has stood him in good stead in getting 
at the bottom of the rules and regulations and the pro- 
cedure of the Police Department. He has visited every 
police district in the city, and has devoted many hours to 
his duties as a Commissioner outside those that mark 
the time he attends the weekly meeings of the board. 

Commissioner Turkington, while he holds an important 
job with the Federal War Production Board, has taken 
as seriously, as his two associates, his duties on the Police 
Board. He too, has spent a lot of hours during his first 
year as a Commissioner, to learn what law enforcement 
means. So well has he done this chore that Mayor Lapham 
last month appointed him to an additional four-year term 
on the Board of Police Commissioners. 

He, like Commissioner Sullivan, is a native of San 
Fraricisco, and during his school and college days was 
quite an athlete, and during his activities in this Ime of 
endeavor he had the greatest occasion to know his people 
and his old home town, which eminently fits him for his 
present city position. 

San Francisco has had many good police commission- 
ers during the past two generations, but it's evident to 
all loyal residents of San Francisco, that Mayor Lapham 
made no mistake when he appointed these present three 
men, and that they have never been excelled for loyalty, 
ability, common sense, and a great desire to do the job as 
well, as any of their predecessors, or better. 

Telephone YUkon 1894 

Central California Construction Company 

GENERAL CONTRACTORS 

230 CALIFORNIA STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

UNderhill 8100 

KENYON SPENCER, INC. 

ELEVATOR SERVICE AND REPAIRS 

1173 HOWARD STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone DOuglas 2856 

CARL LAMERDIN 

Furniture, Linoleum, Stoves — New and Used 
1225 STOCKTON STREET 

Between Pacific and Broadway SAN FRANCISCO 



I 



COAST LINE TRUCK SERVICE, INC. 

104 CLAY STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



Treat Your Gas and 

Electric Appliances 

With Ever- Loving Care 



Your present Gas and Electric 
appliances should be given the ut- 
most care and attention. They must 
be made to last — at least for an- 
other year. This year will find few, 
if any, new appliances available to 
the public. Demands of the war ef- 
fort will continue to take precedence 
for the critical materials going into 
these household conveniences. 

Every appliance you have should 
be regularly examined. See to it that 
each one is in good operating con- 
dition. Never allow them to be 
abused. Follow the manufacturer's 
instructions about oiling. If repairs 
are necessary, attend to them at 
once. 

If you are unable to make the re- 
pairs yourself, ask at any local P. G. 
8C E. office for the name and address 
of an authorized repair-dealer in 
your neighborhood. 



PacificGasandElectriGCompany 



PJ GE 7-245 



Page 32 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 

FBI School in San Mateo 



February, 1945 



As many county peace officers took advantage of the 
offer of the FBI to conduct a course of poHce training, San 
Mateo County joined wholeheartedly in the plan. 

The police school was held from September 2^" to De- 
cember 18th, inclusive, and the law enforcement officers 
from the various municipal police departments, the Sher- 
iff's office, and the Highway Patrol assigned to the county, 
met weekly in the San Mateo Junior College. The educa- 
tional course was sponsored by the Peninsula Peace Of- 
ficers' Association, who voted adequate funds for the 
proper care of the experts furnished by the FBI, and from 
various law enforcement agencies. 

It was a well prepared program the men had placed 
before them. Speakers well trained in the particular subject 
they presented gave valuable methods of procedure for the 
prevention of crime and the apprehension of criminals. 

The opening week was notable for the appearance of 
Chief Special Agent N. J. L. Pieper, who explained the 
purpose of the school and gave an interesting talk on 
public relations. 

Others from the district FBI jarticipating were Special 
Agent J. D. Sullivan, F. 'Warner, George Capps, H. B. 
Hove, E. F. Minoux, Eugene Jones and W. H. Shaw. 

Dr. Jesse Carr and Joseph Swim, toxocologists for San 
Francisco Coroner Dr. John Kingston were two other 
speakers. Other lecturers were : 

Inspector Frank Murphy of the Missing Persons' Bu- 
reau; Sergeant George Duncan and Inspector James John- 
son of the Burglary Detail of the San Francisco Police 
Department; Engineer Walter Harrington of San Mateo's 
Sheriff's Office; Chief Deputy District Attorney A. 'W, 
Witmore, Judge Maxwell McNutt of San Mateo, and 
Chief Joseph O'Farrell of the State Division of Narcotics. 
Indications of the unusual interest taken in this course 
might be well to point out that 119 peace officers of the 
county, never missed a session of the weekly programs. 
These members were awarded diplomas setting forth their 
unbroken record of attendance, at a meeting of the Penin- 
sula Peace Officers' Association held in December at Bur- 
lingame. President Thomas Connors gave praise to each 
man receiving a diploma, and commended Chief Pieper 
and his corps of FBI special agents and other speakers 
present during the course. 

Diplomas were granted to the following : 
Burlingame — Lorin Todd. Fred Mowrey, Carl Schwann, 
Robert Hinterman, Edward Burrows, Ralph Kelly, Ed- 
ward Hallett, John Price, D. Kreeger, Fred Caviglia, 
Lawrence Furrio, Richard Grunig, Ray Nelson, John 
Theuer. 

South San Francisco — August Terragno, William 
Whipple, Michael Lamuth, Maria Blandini, L. A. Sarag- 
naro, Arthur Rodoni, Joseph Bidlhauer, Nello La::eri, 
Vincent Biachini, F. Bertucelli. 

Hillsborough — Chief Walter Winsom, Elmer Funke, 
James Greely, Arthur Binder, Theodore Stead, Q. A. 
Turner. Lee Lane, George Kurrell. 



F. Roach, H. M, 



Daly City— William Bolger, R. A. Petrocchi, R. Beech- 
er, J. Welch, D. Wood, George Savage, R. Renedetti, 
Henry Sunderman, Edward Beecher. Augustine Benassini. 

San Bruno— Chief William Maher, James Bedford, 
Henry North, Russell Cunningham, Arthur Brittain, 
Adolph Fernandez, Peter Evans, Frederick K. Gomes, 
Frank Bottari. 

Menlo Park — Chief John Yount, 
Thomas, George Potter, J. Ferriera. 

Belmont — Chief Fred Johnson. 

Millbrae— Chief William Stetter. 

San Mateo — John Murphy, Zackery Whitten, Henry 
Kohnen, James Casey, William Andreasen, Walter Otten, 
William Oakes 

Redwood City— Chief C. L. Collins, Phillip Bray, Cole 
Stafford, A. C. Hoffman, Mr. Ogborn, Clyde Gennochio, 
William Failstich, Robert F. West, Dana Morgan, Theo- 
dore Moudarras, J. A. Mansfield, Stanley Wood, Henry 
Menge, E. Fogarty, S. F. T. Douglas, W. H. Thorpe. 

Atherton — Chief John E. Ferrell, LeRoy Hubbard, 
Claude Swaze. 

Mountain View — Chief A, A. Excell, A. Parker, A. 
Neilsen, R. R. Regli. 

San Carlos — George Seely, Frank Lucero, J. S. Fair- 
field, R. B. Masters, W. A. Werner, Roy B. McArthur, 
L. Saylor, C. A. Mueller, D. F. Driechman. 

Sheriff's Office — Walter Moore, Irvin Bedford, N. 
Zompolis, Thomas Maloney, Benjamin Silverstein, Walter 
Harrington, Daniel Hewitt, Robert Lynch, Milton Mine- 
han. Jay Steele, Hugh William, John Hosford, Louis Lodi, 
Sidney Olson, Eugene Albee. 

Highway Patrol — Neal Parker, Robert Farina, Henry 
Minton. Roy Edwards, Walter Swope. 



Phone EXbrook 7580 



New Construction: Mariposa Street Plant 



MARTINOLICH SHIPBUILDING CO. 

Designers - Builders - Repairers 
Five Marine Railways - Pier 52, Plant 



SAN FRANCISCO 



BUY WAR BONDS AND 
WAR STAMPS 



Compliments of 



E. H. EDWARDS COMPANY 



200 BUSH STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



February, J 945 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 33 



PENINSULA PEACE OFFICERS' 
ASSOCIATION 

The first meeting of 194') of the Peninsula Police Of- 
ficers' Association, was held on the evening of Janu- 
ary 3rd, at the Villa Chartier, which has come under the 
management of new owners. A sumptuous dinner, in 
which turkey was the main dish, preceded the business 
meeting. 

Sergeant Lawrence Furio of the Burlingame Police De- 
partment took over the duties of president, to which of- 
fice he had been elected. Junior Past President Thomas 
Connors was prevented from attending and presiding over 
the usual ceremonies attendant to installing new officers. 



Phone RAndolph 4 7 15 



C. St M. McMuUen. Props. 




Inspector Thomas Connors 

He was at home with a had case of influenza. 

Over 50 members were present, it being one of the 
largest attended meetings ever held since the Association 
was formed. The members turned out to welcome their 
newly elected officers, all of whom were present, -includ- 
ing Vice President Chief Robert O'Brien, Sergeant-at- 
Arms Chief Wheeler of San Carlos, Secretary John J. 
Hartnett and Treasurer John Theuer. 

President Furio thanked those present and it went for 
those unable to attend, for electing him as their presiding 
officer, and he displayed, by his ready understanding of 
his duties, that he is going to make a fine top officer. 

The first of those called on for a few remarks was 
Special Agent Harold Hove, of the FBI, San Francisco 

TAYLOR & SPOTSWOOD CO. 



700 PENNSYLVANIA STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Compliments of 

BIRD ARCHER CO. 

19 FREMONT STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Compliments of 

SUMSKI, HARBAND & SUMSKI 

15 10 EVANS STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



GLEN PARK K & K GROCERY 

WINES — LIQUORS 

685 CHENERY ST.. near Diamond SAN FRANCISCO 



BUY WA R BONDS 



KLondike 21 Ml 



F. BOBSIEN. Proprietor 



HELEN'S BAKERY 

Specializing in 
BIRTHDAY AND PARTY CAKES 



600 GUERRERO ST., Cor. 18th 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Telephone HEmlock 5353 

H E F ' S 

Ladies* and Gentlemen's Tailor 

Suits, Coats, Skirts, Slacks Made to Order — Cleaning, Pressing 

Repairs - Alteration, 

2 109 MARKET STREET SAN FRANCISCO M 

MITTAG & VOLGER 

INCORPORATED 

Manufacturers of 

CARBON PAPERS — INKED RIBBONS 

59 1 MISSION STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone EXbrook 4898 — Res. ORinda 3621 

E . J . LAND 

Authorized Watch Inspector For 
SOUTHERN PACIFIC CO. — WESTERN PACIFIC R. R. 

Watch Repairing with Care and Precision — Watches 6c Jewelry 
745 THIRD ST. (Opp. Depot) SAN FRANCISCO 7 

Telehone SUtter 5 109 



HARRIS &: BISSELL 



CARGO SUPERINTENDENTS 
CERTIFIED PUBLIC WEIGHERS 



200 DAVIS STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone EXbrook 9843 



The Original Fly Trap - Established 1890 



LOUIS' FASHION RESTAURANT 

Regular Dinners - Also a la Carte 
Fish & Sea Foods Specially Prepared - Parties and Banquet Facilities 

524-26 MARKET STREET, nr. Sansome & Sutter SAN FRANCISCO 
Phone SUtter 5008 Manufacturers and Jobbers 

CONTINENTAL VOGUE CO. 

TRUNKS - SUITCASES - LEATHER GOODS 
AIRPLANE LUGGAGE - ATHLETIC TRUNKS 

199 SECOND STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



PACIFIC FELT COMPANY, INC. 

Manufacturers - Distr'butors 
of Quality Cotton and Wool Products 

700-798 YORK STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



SHEWAN-JONES, INC. 

LEJON BRAND"!' - LEJON VERMOUTH 

CHATEAU LEJON RED AND WHITE DINNER WINES 

HARTLEY BRANDY • HARTLEY DRY SHERRY 

Phone GArfield 8175 

MENDELSON 8C BAUER 



OFFICE ADDRESS: 2 1 MORRIS STREET 
YARD ADDRESS: 967 H.ARRISON STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



BRIDGE, BEACH & CO. 

SUPERIOR STOVES 



22ND AND INDIANA STREETS 



SAN FRANCISCO 



STUART OXYGEN CO. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



Page 34 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Febr 



1945 



office, who was a guest. Agent Hove gave a humorous 
series of stories on salesmanship, stressing some of the 
difficulties encountered by the seUing gents. He is an able 
story teller, as well as an excelled FBI man and he put 
those in attendance in a fine state of humor. 

Sergeant Bud Thorpe of the Redwood Police Depart- 
ment who has announced his retirement from the Police 
Department to take a job with the District Attorney's 
office, was called upon and said that after more than 20 
years doing police work, he regretted giving up his mem- 
bership in the Association and said he has until March 1, 
to take an active part in its meetings: 

The following new members were voted in : 

Peter Bailey, Mountain View; J. Clark Welsh, Edward 
Beacher and Dean A. Wood, of Daly City; and John 
Casey of San Mateo. 

President Furio appointed a Speakers" Committee, 
whose duty will be to provide outstanding speakers at 
the monthly meetings. The committee is made up of Chief 
Robert O'Brien of San Mateo, Sergeant George Douglas 
of Redwood City, and Chief William Maher of San 
Bruno. 

A Rules Committee was announced to check over the 
rules and by-laws of the Association. Chief John E. Fer- 
rell of Atherton, Lieutenant L. D. Woods of Redwood 
City and Deputy Chief Hartnett were appointed by the 
president. 

Deputy Chief Hartnett brought up the matter of health 
insurance for the members of the Association and the fol- 
lowing committee was appointed to go into the matter: 
Chief Walter Wisnom of Hillsborough, Chief Wheeler 
and Hartnett. 

President Furio announced that during the year 1944 
the dues collected from the membership was 100 per cent, 
and said he hoped the present year would equal that 
record. 

The next meeting is scheduled for Redwood City. 



Big Policeman James Mahoney of Northern Station has 
faced many situations during his long service as a member 
of the San Francisco Police Department, and he has always 
met them with efficiency and dispatch. 

Last December he met up with a situation that not 
only called for fast thinking but for the use of the fine set 
of muscles he is blessed with. He was patrolling hi? beat 
along Ellis Street when his attention was attracted to a 
noise of breaking glass. He looked overhead, from whence 
the noise came, and saw a woman hanging out the second 
story window of an apartment house. He set himself and 
yelled to the woman to jump. She responded to his com- 
mind and Officer Mahoney caught her as easily as Joe 
Dimaggio used to catch flies at Seal Stadium, only Officer 
Mahoney had something bigger than a baseball to catch. 
The lady in question, who said she wanted to commit 
suicide, but now had changed her mind, was treated at the 
Central Emergency Hospital for a lacerated hand, which 
she got when she pushed it through the window. 

If it hadn't been for Officer Mahoney she would have 
beer- treated for a busted skull. 



EXbrook 3856 

A. Engelhardt 8C Son — Fred Orput 

Russ Building. Room 1 162 
2 35 MONTGOMERY ST. SAN FRANCISCO 



MATTEUCCI & VANNUCCI CO.. INC. 



643 FRONT STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



UNderhiU 0438 



.Ansel J. Schloss 



ANSEL J. SCHLOSS, INC. 

STUDEBAKER — QUALITY USED CARS 
49 SO. \AN NESS AVE., bet. Market & Mission. SAN FRANCISCO 
Phone HEmlock 1755 L. H. Meyers 

PACIFIC TEA PACKING COMPANY 

INDIVIDUAL TEA BAG PACKING 
Coffee Urn Bags — Flannel Filter Pads 

1663 MISSION ST. SAN FRANCISCO 3 

Phone SUtter 5907 

FRED J. MAURER & SON 

GENERAL CONTRACTORS 

39 1 SUTTER STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Compliments of 

I. MAGNIN & CO. 

GEARY and GRANT AVENUE SAN FRANCISCO 

W. C. LASSWELL & CO. 

MORTICIANS 
6154 MISSION STREET DALY CITY. CALIF. 



Phone ORdway 193 2 



L. E. Rodgers. Managing Owner 



BROADMOOR HOTEL 



SUTTER at GOUGH 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Compliments of 

MONROE - ANDREW 



386 POST STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



AMERICAN CHAIN 8c CABLE CO. 



695 BRYANT STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone EXbrook 0172 



FRANKLIN MACHINE CO. 



Manufacturers 
ENGINEERS and MACHINISTS 



120- 126 FOLSOM STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



MArket 2772 

UNION MACHINE COMPANY 

ENGINEERS and MACHINISTS 

934-944 BR.ANN.AN STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



UNderhiU 3481 



.Angelo A. Carnevale 



H. & S. BRAKE SERVICE 

Official Brake Station No. 32 
Wheel Aligning - Shimmy and Tire Wear - Wheel Balanc:ng 

Dynamic and Static - Knee Action Specialists 
32 1 GOUGH. bet. Fulton and Grove SAN FRANCISCO 

UNderhiU 0300 - 0301 

Golden West Laundry 
Coast Coat 8C Apron Supply Co. 

We supply and Launder Washable Wearing Apparel and Table Linen 
437-447 GRO\'E ST. for Commercial & Family Needs San Francisco 



February, J 945 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL Page 35 



Phone GAaystone 9966 Walter C. Dana. San Francisco Branch Manager. 

TIL TWO ABBOTT LABORATORIES 

"A Congenial Rendezvous" Dermatological Research Laboratories 

502 ELLIS STREET, near Leavenworth SAN FRANCISCO 612 HOWARD STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



__. ,.„. ^J 1 o lin Phone RAndolph 9605 "Hap" Hogan — "Ches"Boehm 

Phone ORdway 4884 M. J. Pope. Mgr. „ ^ „,■ %, j \ . .u 

Coming or going on the Mission Koad stop at the 

HOTEL SHAWMUT A VAT ON TAVERN 

$1.50 with Bath - Attractive Rates to Permanent Guests ■^ '^ r-t.i^'K^Li x i-» t t.ivi. 

5 15 OFarrell Street. Cor. Jones S.AN FRANCISCO 4370 MISSION ST. Corner of Theresa SAN FRANCISCO 



CArfield 1140 Established 1863 Phone R.Andolph 1336 

C. M. VOLKMAN 8c COMPANY HUMPHREY'S CRULLER BAKERY 

WHOLESALE SEED — GRASS, FIELD, BIRD, FLAVORING 

55 UNION STREET SAN FRANCISCO 15 EXCELSIOR STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



Telephone DOuglas 0644 CArfield 0110 

V . D O O K I N THE O'CONNOR CO., INC. 

CHURCH GOODS 

456 GRANT AVENUE SAN FRANCISCO 3,3 gUTTER STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Phones: ORdway 5124-5 125 

KNITKRAFT, SPORTSWEAR 

5 1 STOCKTON STREET, near OTarreell JACK RANIS AUTO METAL WORKS 

2544 MISSION STREET, near Twenty-second Radiator, Fender and Body Repairing- Lacquer Refinishing 

Telephone ATwater 1690 SAN FRANCISCO |634 . 1644 PINE STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone SUtter 4283 Compliments of 

C . T . WHITE CHARLIE'S AND BILL'S PLACE 

A. Gusmer, Inc. - Schock, Gusmer & Co., Inc. - Geo. F. Ott Co. 

50 HAWTHORNE STREET SAN FRANCISCO |898 FOLSOM STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



Phon; MArket 0419 Gus Wolf Phone VAlencia 57 J 5 Fred Bernier, Sec.-Treas. 

San Francisco Screw Products Co. PREMIER PAPER BOX CO. 

Manufacturers of ™.. u t uiawi^i c i r\-w R^voe 

SCREW MACHINE PRODUCTS ^ ^^.^ "°'!'.^ °' ^^^w^^L °s^ J,° Mountine 

Fancy Die Cutting - tmbossmg - ancet Mounting 

755 BRANNAN STREET SAN FRANCISCO ,^g ALABAMA ST, SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone MArket 6336 J, A. Arnke ' ' , , , „ .^ _ .... 

Phone EXbrook 3 123 Founded by R. T. Crane 1855 

ARNKE IRON WORKS CRANE CO. 

ORNAMENTAL METALS & STRUCTURAL IRON ^ . Pi„i . p . pi„„b;„^ . Heating - Pumps 

Fire Escapes — Bronze, Aluminum, Stamless Steel vaives ■ itimss x p s 

780-786 BRANNAN STREET SAN FRANCISCO 301 BRANNAN STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



MAIN STREET AUTO PARK NOTRE DAME HIGH SCHOOL 

Entrance on Main Street, Rear of Matson Building 

SAN FRANCISCO 347 DOLORES STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



Phon; MArket 7786 



UNITED DRUG COMPANY WM. MARTIN & SON 

BUILDING CONTRACTORS 

598 SEVENTH STREET SAN FRANCISCO ^^^ MISSION STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Phones SUtter 1642 - 1643 

ENSIGN CAFE, INC. ROLANDO LUMBER COMPANY 

FIR - SPRUCE - REDWOOD 

NO. 1 MARKET STREET SAN FRANCISCO yard and Mill: 5th & BERRY STS. SAN FRANCISCO 

Mrs. H. Fred Suhr. Pres. Herbert F. Suhr. Vice-Pres. 

Phone Mission 1811 

H. F. SUHR CO.. INC. °'-"^'= FOUNDATION 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS STREET SAN FRANCISCO 
2919 MISSION ST.. bet. 25th & 26th SAN FRANCISCO. cl,l-ij ji 



S. F. Phone EXbrook 4548 S. J. Phone Columbia 3911 



BUY WAR BONDS 



DR. A. O. WEHINGER ,^,^ c-r-^.^nc 

CHIROPRACTOR and RADIONIST AND jlAMFb 

26 OTARRELL ST. 1 990 THE ALAMEDA 

SAN FRANCISCO SAN JOSE 

Phone Fillmore 3100 Telephone MArket 73 1 4 Charles Werner 

HIRSCHFELD SALES COMPANY WERNER BROS . 

Dealers in DIAMONDS and PRECIOUS STONES 

COIN OPERATED AMUSEMENT GAMES EXPERT WATCHMAKERS and JEWELERS 

736 DIVISADERO STREET SAN FRANCISCO 1 1 86 MARKET STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



Page 36 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Fehruarv, ■194 J 




Phone WEst 1552 



Bric-a-Brac, Furniture. Etc. 



Mrs. Victoria Miron Misfit Parlors 

Positively Pays the Highest Prices For Ladies and Gents Second- 
Hand Gowns, Dresses and Suits. Also New Furs. 

1750 GEAR\' ST.. bet. Fillmore 8t Webster SAN FRANCISCO. 

Telephone DOuglas 3910 

J. M. SHALEIN MUSIC CO. 

IMPORTED AND DOMESTIC MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS 
AND ACCESSORIES. EXCLUSIVELY WHOLESALE 

718 MISSION STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone EXbrook 1940 

ATLAS ELEVATOR COMPANY 

MANUFACTURING - REPAIRS - MAINTENANCE 

417 SIXTH STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



G. Kenneth Girard. Manager 



Wilfrid J. Girard, Proprietor 



JOHN'S GRILL 

AND OYSTER PARLOR 



63 ELLIS STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



NORTHWEST ENGINEERING CO. 



255 TENTH ST. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phon2 UNderhiU 716 1 



Sheet, Rod, Wire, Tube, Rivets, Wire Cloth 



R . J. LEAHY CO. 

Brass, Copper, Bronze and Nickel Silver Products 

468 EIGHTH STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



San Francisco Police Officers, more than SO of them, visited the 
Red Cross Blood Donor Center recent!3' to ma\e their donations 
of Ufe-saving blood for u'oimded men oversea.?. At the same time, 
they noted for their own contestant in the current "^uee7i of the 
Purple Hearts" competition. Here Traffic Officer Michael Hic\' 
man of Companv K is about to cast his ballot and that of a fellou' 
oflicer for Mrs, Mary O'Mallev. Police entrant, right in front of 
Miss fean Sullman. 

Phone sutler 9898 "Everything Homemade" 

THE MAGIC CUPBOARD 

Fresh Garden Vegetables - Luncheon - Dinner 

Open 11 a,m, to 2:30 p.m. - Closed Sundays 
127 GRANT AVENUE (Third Floor) SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone SUtter 45 35 

J. H. POMEROY 8C CO., INC. 

GENERAL CONTRACTORS 

333 MONTGOMERY ST. SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone DOuglas 5 740 Dies. Jigs, Fixtures, Special Machinery 

LATHE TOOL WORKS 

Fine Model and Experimental Work, Gear Cutting, Toolwork, Etc. 



GENERAL MACHINE WORK 



3 7 CLEMENTINA ST. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



EXbrook 8143 



FRANK K ARP 

MANUFACTURING JEWELER 
Diamonds - Watches - Jewelry 



133 KEARNY STREET. RQOM 201 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone EXbrook 4862 

GA RTNER 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 



171 SECOND STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



G RAN AT B ROS. 

America's Largest Retail Manufacturing Jewelers 
GRANT AVE. AT GEARY. 20th AT MISSION SAN FRANCISCO 



19lh AT BROADWAY 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone YUkon 2092 

EDWARD F. HALE COMPANY 

CONSTRUCTION MACHINERY 

925 HARRISON STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



GRACE'S GROTTO 



53 1 OCTAVIA STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone DOuglas 1800 



Four Changes of Pictures Each Week 



DOWNTOWN THEATRE 

The Theatre With the Rocking Chairs 

Largest, Most Comfortable Popular-Priced Theatre in San Francisco 
ELLIS and MASON STREETS SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



THE GRAY LINE 



739 MARKET STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Compliments of 



E. J. Willig Truck Transportation Co. 



565 BERRY STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CHANCELLOR HOTEL 



435 POWELL STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone ORdway 5866 

F. ALIOTO FISH CO. 

Producers and Wholesalers 

FOOT OF LEAVENWORTH STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



WEST COAST LIFE INSURANCE CO. 



605 MARKET STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone Mission 7677 

COMMERCIAL TRUCK SERVICE 

CONTRACT HAULING 

2590 OAKDALE AVENUE SAN FRANCISCO 

BUY MORE AND MORE WAR BONDS 



February, 1945 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 37 



SERGEANT THORPE OF SAN MATEO 
P. D. JOINS DIST. ATTORNEY'S STAFF 

Sergeant W. H. (Bud) Thorpe has been granted a 
year's leave of absence from the Redwood City Police 
Department, and it looks like Chief C. L. Collins is to 
lose another valuable member of the legal profession. 
About a score of years ago Officer Edward McAullife 
was elevated to the position of Justice of the Peace in 
Redwood City township, and he has served ever since 



CLIPPER CLEANERS & DYERS 

S. Azzolino. Prop 
EXPERT TAILOR 

630 BROADWAY STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



GArfield 9652 



Marie and Victor 



614 CLUB 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE AND RESTAURANT 

614 BROADWAY SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone GArfield 9901 



J. Pia. Proprietor 



CLUB OKIE-DOKIE 




619 BROADWAY 



SAN FRANCISCO II. CALIF. 



Sergeant W. H. (Bud) Thorpe 

with distinction, and won re-election every time he came 
up before the voters of his district. 

Sergeant Thorpe is going to take a job as assistant Dis- 
trict Attorney under District Attorney Gilbert D. Ferrell. 

During his membership in the Redwood City Police 
Department, to which he was appointed in August, 1924, 
Sergeant Thorpe has served as foot patrolman, radio car 
patrolman and has done a stretch as a motorcycle officer, 
as well as doing a term as office man. He was made a ser- 
geant on July 1, 1939. 

Since the present war started he has in addition to his 
regular police duties been Chief Air Raid Warden for 
the Redwood City War Council, Alien Permit Officer and 
Chief Light Control Officer. 

He is a charter member of the Peninsula Police Of- 
ficers' Association, and was president of that organization 
for the year 1939, and is at the present time a trustee 
of the association. 

One would think with a record of activities, such as has 
marked his service as a police officer he would not have 
very much time for any other activities. Yet in 1928 he 
took up the study of the law at night, and so well did he 
apply his time that he was admitted to the bar by the 
Supreme Court in 1936. 

Sergeant Thorpe has been married for 15 years, and 
resides in his own home with his wife and three children, 
a daughter 14 years of age, a son 7 and a baby daughter 
5 years. 

In his new job with the District Attorney's office he 



Telephone CHina 062 5 



Cable Address: Wingduck 



WING DUCK CO. 

LIQUOR, WINE and GROCERY 
HAWAIIAN FRESH POI 

960-944 STOCKTON ST. SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

Telephone GArfield 93 13 Fermin Huarte — John Bordalampe. Props. 

HOTEL DE ESPANA 

AND RESTAURANT — Headquarters lor Wool, Sheep, Cattlemen 

(Euskaldun Etchea) Established 1907 

781-785 BROADWAY SAN FRANCISCO 



Telephone Mission 5863 



A. LEAL. Tailor 



TERMINAL CLEANERS & DYERS 

Where Your Business Is Appreciated, and Your Garments Receive 

the Proper Care 
3392 26th STREET, Near Mission SAN FRANCISCO 



DAVE'S MARKET 

WE CARRY WINE, BEER and GROCERIES OF ALL KINDS 



1469 SAN PABLO AVE. 



BERKELEY. CALIF. 



KING'S PLACE 

Good Service — We Carry Good Liquors, Wine and Beer 
1202 TWENTY-THIRD AVE. OAKLAND, CALIF. 

TREASURE ISLAND CAFE 

Makes You Feel at Home 
ALL KINDS OF GOOD LIQUORS 



2327 EAST FOURTEENTH ST. 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Ph. HIgate 5900 New Modern Coffee Shop Harry B. Strang. Mgr. 

HOTEL SAN PABLO 

A Modern Centrally Located Down Town Hotel at Moderate Rates 

Where Courtesy, Comfort and Hospitality Prevail 
SAN PABLO AVE. at 20th STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone TEmplebar 9963 



Storage - Parking - Oiling & Greasing 



CANTON GARAGE 



GUARANTEED AUTOMOTIVE REPAIRING 

All Repairing Under Personal Supervision of Billy Chu 
7 15 ALICE STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 



GENERAL CABLE CORPORATION 



EMERYVILLE 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone GLencourt 6746 



William E. McGrath 



McGRATH STEEL COMPANY 

REINFORCING STEEL - STEEL PRODUCTS 

131 HARRISON STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 

will be first assigned to civil investigating work, but if 
he stays after his leave of absence from the Police Depart- 
ment he will be assigned to try court cases. 

While San Mateo County police officers don't like to 
lose such an able and popular member of their profession, 
they are wishing Bud Thorpe a lot of luck in his new spot 
and all agree he'll make good in a big way. 



Page 38 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



February, 194S 



Inspector George Englcr, who has been in the U. S. 
Navy since a short time after war was declared, has been 
given an honorable discharge and has rejoined the Police 
Department. The returned Inspector was on shore duty 
for several months before he was sent to sea. He saw 
service on the Atlantic and saw plenty of activity. He 
retired as a Chief Boatswain Mate. For years before he 
entered the service of his county he was in charge of the 
Homicide Detail, and in that spot and others he became 
recognized as one of the Department's most efficient 
officers. 

CLEMENT LAUNDRY 



J. N. LIQUOR STORE 



WINES 

2973 SAN PABLO AVE. 



LIQUOR - BEER 

OAKLAND, CALIF. 



KEY CLUB ROOMS 



3906 SAN PABLO AVE. 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Telephone LAkehurst 2-7587 
Minimum 35c 



24 12 CLEMENT STREET 



ALAMEDA. CALIF. 



Phone LAkehurst 2-9964 



Santi Cennai, Prop. 



FENCED INN 



AND FAMILY LIQUOR STORE 
Checks Cashed 



13 04 LINCOLN AVE., at Sherman 



ALAMEDA. CALIF. 



Telephone LA. 2-0488 

WRIGHT'S SUPER SERVICE 

GASOLINE, OIL AND LUBRICATION 
AUTO REPAIRING - BATTERIES - TIRES 

OAK STREET and ENCINAL AVE. ALAMEDA. CALIF. 



LE 2-9947 



Meet Your Friends at 

THE CAVE 



1257 PARK STREET 



ALAMEDA. CALIF. 



Telephone LA 2-7253 

DURAN'S SERVICE 

RICHFIELD - LUBRICATION - TUNE-UP 

Our Motto: "Honesty" 
2268 ENCINAL AVE., cor. OAK ST. .ALAMED.A. CALIF. 

Telephone LAkehurst 2-2272 

ALAMEDA DELICATESSEN 

FINE FOODS AND WINES 
2327 CENTRAL AVENUE ALAMEDA. CALIF. 

FRANK'S LITTLE DINER 

GOOD THINGS TO EAT 

For Breakfast, Lunch or Dinner 

1705 PARK STREET ALAMEDA. CALIF. 

Phone LAkehurst 2-7575 

ALAMEDA PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 

GENERAL PLUMBING AND HEATING 
REPAIRING & CONTRACTING 

1717 PARK STREET ALAMEDA. CALIF. 

Phone LAkehurst 2-9974 

PARK CLUB 

MIXED DRINKS 

We Cash Pay Checks 

1535 PARK STREET ALAMEDA. CALIF. 

LAkehurst 2-7122 

OAKLAND BRASS FOUNDRY 

BRASS, BRONZE and ALUMINUM CASTINGS 

2 J 19 CLEMENT AVE. 

Two Blocks South of Park St. Bridge ALAMEDA. CALIF. 

Bus. LAkehurst 2-0643 



Res. LAkehurst 2-9297 



SNIDER BROS. REPAIR SERVICE 



Percy Snider. Prop. 
2307 CENTRAL AVE., at Oak St. 



.ALAMEDA. CALIF. 



Phone LA. 2-5717 

MODERN LAUNDRY CO. 

ALL WORK DONE BY UNION LABOR 
Office and Works. 1926 PARK ST. AL.AMEDA. CALIF. 



Piedmont 9299 

DICK'S INN 

WINES - LIQUORS - MIXED DRINKS 
I 1 I i STANFORD AVE. OAKLAND. CAL. 

ONEIDA NURSERY 

WHOLESALE ONLY 

266 ONEIDA AVE. SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



RALPH A. BRODIE CO., INC. 



61st and LOWELL STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



EMERYVILLE POOL - SNOOKER 

CIGARETTES AND CIGARS 

4118 SAN PABLO AVE EMERYVILLE. CALIF. 

HAMBURGER KING 

HOT DOGS — HAMBURGER — CHIH — SHORT ORDERS 

The Best Than Money Can Buy 
1401 WEBSTER ST. ALAMEDA. CALIF. 



Phone LAkehurst 3-2135 



John De Graw, Prop. 



THE ALAMEDA TAILOR 

Specialists in Navy and Army Uniforms — Sundry Service 
Coats Cleaned — Relining, Pressing, Alterations — Call and Deliver 



1801 WEBSTER ST. 



ALAMEDA. CAL. 



Phone LA. 2-9959 



E. J. Walton. Prop. 



THE ISLAND CLUB 

FOR BETTER DRINKS 

2320 SANTA CLARA AVE. ALAMEDA. CALIF. 

VICTOR CAFE 

RESTAURANT — GOOD MEALS 
Reasonable Prices Best Service 



15 18 BUENA VISTA AVE. 



ALAMEDA. CALIF. 



Phone LA. 2-9411 

ISLAND CITY ICE CO. 

ICE PROMPTLY DELIVERED 

23 10 ENCINAL AVE. .ALAMEDA. CALIF. 

HOOPER'S CONFECTIONERY, INC. 



2333 CLEMENT AVE. 



ALAMEDA. CALIF. 



ARKIES' CAFE 

AND RESTAURANT 

Good Meals at Reasonable Prices 

(13 PARK STREET ALAMEDA. CALIF. 



ALAMEDA CHOICE MARKET 

FRUITS AND VEGETABLES OF ALL KINDS 
GOOD SERVICE 

1540 PARK STREET ALAMEDA, CALIF. 



February, 194S 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 39 



LISTO PENCIL CORPORATION 

ALAMEDA. CALIFORNIA 
Since 192 1 

Phone 2-4070 



KEUog 4-3710 



The Art-California Cleaning Works 

CLEANERS AND DYERS 



1 647 EAST FOURTEENTH ST. 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Mrs. Adamy, Managing Owner Phone BErkeley 7756 



Homer H. Lee — Renmi J. Lee 



FORREST COFFEE SHOP 



"FOOD AS YOU LIKE IT" 



2410 SANTA CLARA AVE. 



ALAMEDA, CALIF. 



San Pablo Florist and Nursery 

1806 SAN PABLO AVE. BERKELEY, CALIF. 



Phone LA. 2-9971 



George Russell, Prop. KElIog 2-6434 



Ann and John 



RUSSELL'S BANK CLUB 

1527 PARK STREET ALAMEDA. CALIF. 



BLACK & WHITE LIQUOR STORE 

BOTTLED WINES AND LIQUORS 
1244 TWENTY. THIRD AVE. OAKLAND 6, CALIF. 



Phones Richmond 3849 - 3850 



A. Kastelic THornwall 8478 



CIVIC CENTER TIRE 8C BATTERY CO. 

AUTOMOTIVE EQUIPMENT 

213 1 MACDONALD AVE. RICHMOND, CALIF. 



BILL PAGE'S STANDARD SERVICE 



TIRES AND RECAPPING 



BARRETT AND SAN PABLO 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone Richmond 536 



E. Mayfield 



MAYFIELD PAINT 8C GLASS CO. 

PAINTS, GLASS and WALLPAPER 
GLASS and GLAZING OF ALL TYPES 



Cor 11th and NEVIN AVE. 



RICHMOND. CALIF. 



Phone 700 



OWL TAXI 

24-HOUR SERVICE 



RICHMOND, CALIF. 



Phone Richmond 1804 



Butch and Val's 



TWO BROTHERS AUTO PARTS 

GASOLINE and OILS 

Beer and Wine - at Two Brothers' Station 

47th and PULLMAN AVE. RICHMOND, CALIF. 

Richmond 5 06 

DAVID M.ROSE 

DODGE - PLYMOUTH 

2420 MACDONALD AVE. RICHMOND, CALIF. 

Phone Richmond 2 731 

MOSS ROSE BAKKERY 

FOR BETTER BAKERY PRODUCTS 

720 MACDONALD AVE. RICHMOND. CALIF. 

Phone Richmond 634 

RICHMOND BEVERAGE COMPANY 

Wholesalers of 
GRACE BROS. - RAINIER - SCHLIT2 

325 22nd STREET RICHMOND. CALIF. 

Phone Richmond 159 

BREUNER'S 

HOME FURNISHERS SINCE 1856 



1015 MACDONALD AVE. 



RICHMOND. CALIF. 



RAINBOW PAINT STORE 

THE HOUSE OF QUALITY 

FEATURING PREMIER PAINTS — PRACTICAL PAINTERS LINE 

WALL PAPER PAINTS 
Telephone 517 3 1 6 1 I th Street, RICHMOND. CALIF. 



Phone HEmlock 3546 



East Bay Phone KElIogg 2-0762 



ALBE RT E. FAUNT 

STAIRWORK 

MM FIFTEENTH STREET SAN FRANCISCO 3, CALIF. 

Phone RAndoIph 9605 "Hap" Hogan - "Ches" Boehm 

Coming or Going on the Mission Road, Stop at the 

AVALON TAVERN 

4370 MISSION STREET, Cor. Theresa SAN FRANCISCO 



BARGAIN SPOT 

BEDDING OF ALL KINDS — BABY FURNITURE 
New and Used Household Goods — We Buy and Sell 

25 18 SAN PABLO AVENUE BERKELEY. CALIF. 

KEIlog 2-9868 John Linhares 

POUR INN CAFE 

CHOICE WINES - LIQUORS - MIXED DRINKS 

1417 TWENTY-THIRD AVE. OAKLAND, CALIF. 

KEIlog 4-4934 

FERNANDES MARKET 

GROCERIES - MEATS - WINES - BEERS 
1816 EAST FOURTEENTH ST. OAKLAND, CALIF. 



ANdo 



2527 



Alfred Moniz — Alfred Botelho 



FRED AND AL'S MARKET 

GROCERIES 



FRESH FRUITS & VEGETABLES - 
Wholesale and Retail 

1448 TWENTY-THIRD AVENUE. 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



KEIlog 2-9729 Tony Lewis 

LEWIS' INN 

1854 EAST FOURTEENTH ST. OAKLAND 6. CALIF. 



KEIlog 2-8024 



Wm. Johnston 



J. & J. CIDER SHOP 

Choice Wines, Brandies, Liquors — Family Liquors 
Complete Line of Home Beverage Supplies 

1204 FRUITVALE AVE. OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Glencourt 9689 Leo Fleitz 

CALIFORNIA PLYWOOD, INC. 

Successor to WANKE PANEL COMPANY 

WHOLESALE VENEERS AND PANELS 

1403 5th STREET OAKLAND, CAL. 



Telephone HIgate 9413 



Vince Monzo - Leno Pagni 



Newport Restaurant and Cocktail Lounge 

ITALIAN DINNERS 
Featuring Steak and Chicken a la Saute 

13 1 BROADWAY OAKLAND. CALIF. 



TEmpIebar 95 69 



Res. BErkeley 4799-W 



PALM CAFE 



Joe and Rena Bellino, Proprietors 
2969 SAN PABLO AVE. OAKLAND 8. CALIF. 



Piedmont 5652 



We Call For and Deliver 



PLAZA CLEANERS 

Expert Dyers, Furriers and Tailors - Hats Renovated 
All Kinds of Alterations 

998 35th STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 



SAN PABLO CAFE 



COZY PLACE TO EAT AND DRINK 

2 101 SAN PABLO AVE. 



OAKLAND 



Phone ANdover 2200 

DANA-FRANE MOTOR CO. 

Dodge Brothers Motor Cars - Dodg^e Brothers Trucks 

Plymouth Motor Cars 

2901 E. FOURTEENTH STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Page 40 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



February, 1945 



= San Francisco = 




(Copyrisht, 1931, 2-0 Pubtishin( Co.) 
Founded 1922 

Business Office: 465 Tenth Street 

San Francisco, California 

Plione MArket 7110 



An Official Police News and Educational Magazine Devoted 
to the Interests of 

SAN FRANCISCO POLICE DEPARTMENT 
WIDOWS' AND ORPHANS' AID ASSOCIATION 
BAY COUNTIES' PEACE OFFICERS' ASSOCIATION 
PENINSULA POLICE OFFICERS' ASSOCIATION 
NORTHERN CALIFORNIA POLICE COMMUNICA- 
TION OFFICERS' ASSOCIATION 

Published Monthly by 

San Francisco Police and Peace Officers' Journal 

S. F. Police Short Wave Radio Call KGPD 

OUR FOREIGN EXCHANGES 

THE GARDA REVIEW 2 Crow St., Dublin, Ireland 

ALERTA, A. V. JUAREZ Desp. 6, Mexico, D. F. 

RE VISTA DE POLICIA 

Rioja, 666, Buenos Aires, Republic of Argentine, S. A. 

CONSTABULARY GAZETTE _ Belfast, Ireland 

POLICE NEWS New South Wales 

POLICE JOURNAL Wellington, New Zealand 

Make All Checks Payable to San Francisco Police Journal 

OPIE L. WARNER Business Manager and Editor 

SUBSCRIPTION TERMS — $3 a year, payable in advance; 2Sc 
a number. In Canada, $4 a year. Remittance must be made 
by Post Office or Express Money Order, by Registered Letter, 
or by Postage Stamps of 2-cent denomination, or by check. 

IMPORTANT NOTICE— Do not subscribe to S. F. POLICE 
JOURNAL through agents unknown to you personally, or 
who cannot present proper credentials on our stationery. 

ADVERTISING RATES on application. 30 . 



S. F. POLICE B. OF I. ANNUAL REPORT 

The Bureau of Identification of the San Francisco 
Police Department closed the year 1944 with one of the 
heaviest business of its history. 

In his report to Captain of Inspectors Bernard Mc- 
Donald, Lieutenant Timothy Burke, in charge of the 
Bureau, tells of the vast amount) of work the men and 
women assigned to his Bureau completed during the past 
year. 

To begin with, he states that photographs on file total 
464,2 .16, an increase of 19,596 over 194.^. 

Fingerprints on file now total 617,975, 22,226 more 
than there were at the beginning of last year. 

For the year, 4603 prisoners were measured and photo- 
graphed; local identifications were 4685, outside identifi- 
cations 4297. 

The Bureau received 4 J, 784 teletypes and filed 5464. 

Eleven hundred and nine letters were received by the 
Bureau and acted upon; and 7573 miscellaneous com- 
munications were likewise received and acted upon. Circu- 
lars and outside records received amounted to 42, .346. 

Fingerprints taken were 60,682, of which 457 were 
taken at the morgue and resulted in identifying 84 persons 
brought to that place. 

Civilians printed for passports and letters were 2665. 



Received from exchangers were 15,017 fingerprints and 
the same number of photos. The district attorney was fur- 
nished 422 records of prints and photographs. 

Total fingerprints mailed, 41,991, and photographs 
mailed, 39,360. A breakdown of these records reveals the 
bulk of them went to the following departments in the 
state and nation: 

FBI prints, 7209; photos, 4578; California State B. of 
I., 4579 each; Washington State Patrol, 3727 of each; Los 
Angeles Police Department, 3676 of each. Exchanges from 
these agencies totaled 22,800 each. 



DELINQUENCY LECTURES OPEN 

Fifty policemen and women from twenty-one com- 
munities in nothern California assembled at the University 
of San Francisco on February 5 to hear the first of five 
full-day lectures on juvenile delinquency control by 
Howard J. Leahy of the Federal Bureau of Investigation 
(FBI) Training Division. 

Opening ceremonies of the youth crime training school, 
the first of its kind in the West, were conducted by Nat 
J. L, Peiper, special agent in charge of the FBI here, and 
included short speeches by Chief of Police Charles Dullea 
and Police Commissioner President Jerd Sullivan. 

Representing towns as far north as Marysville and as 
far south as King City, the peace officers present were 
chosen by their chiefs of police and police commissions to 
attend the lectures. 

Chief Peiper said the purpose of the school is to enable 
various local law enforcement agencies to have properly 
trained personnel for handling juvenile work. 

The first session dealt with an "Analysis of the Juvenile, 
Both Delinquent and Nondelinquent." 

"Only through understanding of yoiith and its prob- 
lems can the 'cop on the beat' hope to do his part in 
solving the juvenile problem," Leahy, a graduate of the 
FBI National Police Academy, declared. 

In the remaining four lectures, were devoted methods 
to be followed by officers for actual handling of the prob- 
lems,' including programs for closer cooperation between 
the police department and the welfare and civic organiza- 
tions interested in juvenile work. 

After its conclusion here, the school was transferred to 
the University of Santa Clara from February 12 to 16, 
and in Sacramento at the Police Training Academy from 
February 19 to 23. 



The benefit ball of the Inside Special Patrol Officers' 
Association, was held in Scottish Rite Hall, on the eve- 
ning of January 20, and Thomas Lynch, president of the 
organization announces it was not only a great social 
success but was successful from a financial standpoint. 

Peter Maloney, former member of the San Francisco 
Police Department was general chairman of this year's 
event, and he had as assistants Mrs. William Fey, Harry 
Hertzog, Thomas Gagan, M. E. Cohen, Nathan Pollack. 



February, 1945 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 41 



PANAMA CANAL ZONE POLICE 

I Continued from page 1 4 ) 

tains and operates the jails and the penitentiary. The 
Chief of Police, with the rank of Major, is also Warden 
of the Gamboa penitentiary, the penitentiary itself being 
supervised by a Captain of Police as Deputy Warden and 
his staff. The Chief is also Coroner of the Canal Zone, 
and each District Commander is a Deputy Coroner. 

The many different departments of the Canal Zone 
Police are under the supervision of specially trained per' 
sonnel. Chief A. O. Meyer and Sergeant C. O. Baldwin 
are both graduates of the FBI National Police Academy. 
Ballistics is under the direction of Sergeant Jack F. Mor- 
ris, a graduate of the New York City Police Academy. Ser- 
geant William J. Cree is a graduate of the Northwestern 
University Traffic Institute and is in charge of the traffic 
detail at Balboa. Detective Sergeants C. E. Towery and 
R. J. Helmerichs are hand-writing and fingerprint experts. 
Many of the policemen and detectives speak Spanish, so 
necessary for proper co-ordination of police work with 
the National Police Force of the Republic of Panama, and 
many others are qualified experts in investigational work. 

Since the largest Panamanian and Canal Zone cities 
have only a curb stone as a boundary line, constant co- 
operation between the law enforcing agencies of both 
jurisdictions is necessary. Here are also special detach- 
ments of United States Military Police and Shore Patrol 
officers with whom the Canal Zone Police work together 
constantly. 

Bacehlor policemen live in barracks at the different sta- 
tions and sub-stations. Married officers reside with their 
families in regularly assigned family quarters. 

The office of the Chief of Police has constant inter- 
change of information with police authorities in the many 
states and with the FBI in Washington. As a result, the 
Zone Police have been instrumental in apprehending fugi- 
tives from many sections of the world. 

Phone GArfield 03 06 

BEIER & GUNDERSON CO. 

New and Used Office Furniture 
7 7 BATTERY STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

STATION KGO 

AND THE 

BLUE NETWORK CO., INC. 

Compliments of 

GEORGE E. SWETT 8C CO. 

Marine Engineers - Naval Contractors 
SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

Phon- WAInut 5871 

RAY DIAZ 

AUTO AND TRUCK REPAIRING 

2 141 GEARY STREET SAN FRANCISCO 15 

WAInut 173 7 

POST STREET AUCTION STUDIO 

AUCTION EVERY WEDNESDAY 

1865 POST STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



Telephone MArket 7421 

THE LANGEVIN COMPANY 

Incorporated 

New York - San Francisco - Los Angeles - Dallas 

SOUND REINFORCEMENT AND REPRODUCTION ENGINEERING 

1050 HOWARD S TREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

Phone MArket 83 38 

Capitol Cleaning & Dyeing Plant 

Your Garments, Etc., Are Done By Experts Only 



20 BRADY STREET 

Off Market bet. i2th «c Valencia 



We Call and Deliver 
SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 



Phone HEmlock 6818 

WAXMAN'S BAKERIES 

3355 17th STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Telephone TUxedo 9730 Jim Welch 

THE CRITERION - CONFUCIUS 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

574-576 GEARY STREET, near Jones SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone SEabright 2471 Fred Jenny 6c Associates 

MORTICIANS SUPPLY SALES AGENCY 

MANUFACTURERS - JOBBERS - MANUFACTURERS' AGENTS 
Quality Funeral Supplies 

l320-22nd AVENUE SAN FRANCISCO 22. CALIF. 

JIMMIE'S PARAGON 

COCKTAILS 

325 1 SCOTT STREET— IN THE MARINA SAN FRANCISCO 



GRaystone 9800 



Mrs. G. Hilzinger 



HOTEL JEFFERSON APARTMENTS 

Two and Three Rooms — Steam Heat, Hot Water, 
Elevator, Refrigeration 

848 COUGH STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



Telephone GRaystone 9643 



Noel Waggoner 



NOEL WAGGONER 



TOPS - TRIMMINGS - CUSHIONS - SEAT COVERS 

"Quality Pays"' 

714 VAN NESS AVENUE SAN FRANCISCO 2. CAL. 

Phone HEmlock 1089 

GEORGE G. GOLDAMMER 

MANUFACTURER CERAMICS 

27 1 SO. VAN NESS AVE. SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

UNITED GROCERS, LTD. 

FRESNO - STOCKTON - SACRAMENTO 



685 SIXTH STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Telephone EXbrook 5 149 

CLARE WILDY 

PAPER RULING - COMMERCIAL BOOKBINDING 

45 ECKER STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



Mission 9033 



CILMORE PRODUCTS 



MEL AND GIL'S SERVICE 

Expert Lubrication — Washing and Polishing — Ignition Service 

MISSION and VALENCIA SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone KL 2 1060 

DOLORES CREAMERY 

MILKSHAKES AND MALTS 
SANDWICHES OF ALL KINDS 

501 DOLORES ST. SAN FRANCISCO 

RA. 9957 

BAYSIDE MOTEL 

2011 BAYSHORE BLVD. SAN FRANCISCO 



Page 42 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



February, 1945 



Many times in the past the Zone PoHce have picked 
up "wanted" individuals from the State of California. 
During the last dozen years, five such fugitives were sent 
back to the west coast, including: William Bailey who was 
charged with kidnapping for purposes of extortion and 
who had hail set by the Los Angeles County Grand Jury 
at $100,000 (1932); Allen V. Percival, charged with 
three counts of embezzlement (1934) ; Terrence P. Quinn, 
a fugitive from justice (1937); Thomas P. Walters, fugi- 
tive from justice (1937); and George J. Marshall, wanted 
by the Modesto, California authorities (1940). 

Now for a bit of history on this young police force. 
On May 17, 1904, shortly after the ratification of the 
treaty between th? United States and Panama for the 
construction of the Panama Canal, Captain George R. 
Shanton, USA, arrived on the Isthmus to he the first Chief 
of Police. He found the force consisting of one native 
Lieutenant, two native Sergeants, and 72 native police- 
men. This he reorganized into a company of six native 
Corporals, 65 native privates, six American Sergeants, 
one 2nd and one 1st Lieutenant and one Captain, all 
American citizens. 

The first death on the force occurred in July, 1904, 
when the Assistant Chief Clerk of the force died of yellow 
fever. (There is no more yellow fever on the Canal Zone.) 
On the force that year there were Americans, English, 
Jamaicans, Panamanians, Colombians, and Cubans. 

In November, 1906, Guy Johannes reported for duty as 
a first class policeman. Mr. Johannes came up in the ranks 
to become Chief of Police. He was the sixth Chief of 
Police, but the first "civilian" Chief, all the other five 
before him being United States Army Captains. Mr. 
Johannes was appointed Chief in 1917 and retired volun- 
tarily in 1943. 

Early construction days on the Panama Canal were 
rough and rugged as a resume of 242 deaths investigated 
by the coroner in 40 months, up to October, 1907, shows: 
Accidental shooting, six; asphyxiation, one; drowning. 53; 
dynamite explosions, 18; disease, 19; justifiable homicide, 
2; murder, 9; railroad accidents, 114; suicides, 3; stillborn, 
one; miscellaneous accidents, 13; unknown cause, 3. There 
were, of course, no deaths resulting from automobile acci- 
dents. In the fiscal year 1907, the Zone Police made 6,078 
arrests. 



Phone LAndscape 5-5906 

IRA E. SCOTT 

PAINTING CONTRACTOR 

217 Ramona Street 
EL CERRITO CALIF. 



MARINA BOWL 



John D. Cordoni 
COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

1725 FILBERT STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Telephone GArfield 4417 

BROEMMEL'S PHARMACEUTICALS 



384 POST ST.. Fitzhugh Building 



SAN FRANCISCO 



M. C. Barulich & Co., Props. 

JACKSON MARKET 

GROCERIES — DELICATESSEN 
Fruits, Vegetables, Poultry and Fresh Fish 

1201 JACKSON ST.. Cor. Jones St. SAN FRANCISCO 



ORdway 9110 



Ray Colt. Resident Manager 



DEWALT HOTEL 

You Will Feel at Home at the Dewalt 



201 LEAVENWORTH ST. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



THE MIRROR 



63 TAYLOR STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



BUY WA R BONDS 
AND STAMPS 



Phone sutler 6454 



PAWN SHOP 



Cleaning 



I. MINTZ CLOTHING STORE 

Dealer in All Kinds of Articles for Fishermen, Cooks and Waiters 
206 THIRD STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone WEst 3 7 79 We Call and Deliver in the Peninsula Twice a Week 



MME 



FE R R AN 



FRENCH LAUNDRY 
Ladies* and Gents' Underclothing - Laces, Lace Curtains a Specialty 

2843-2845 CLAY STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



EXbrook 3849 



Res. Phone PRospect 8314 



KLENSKY BEAUTY SALON 

INDIVIDUAL COIFFURES — DISTINCTIVE HAIRCUTTING 
PERMANENT WAVING 

150 POWELL ST., Suite 406 SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone GArfield 355 7 



E. G. Benson, Manager 



HOTEL THOMAS 

WARM - CLEAN - QUIET - Reasonable Rates 

Rooms With Private Baths — Also Showers 
97 1 MISSION ST.. near Bus Depot SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone RAndolph 4445 E. Rossi, Prop. 

ROSSI HARDWARE CO. 

Hardware - Household - Electrical Supplies - Tools 
Paints and Oils - Sporting Goods 

S\9\ MISSION ST.. Cor. Niagara Avenue SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone WAlnut 9708 



Frank Banks 



HOUSE OF JOY 



1423 FILLMORE STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



GILMORE OIL COMPANY 



Producers - Refiners - Marketers 

San Francisco Office: 



THIRD AND 18th STREETS 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone YUkon 12001-2-3 

AMERICAN POULTRY CO. 

WHOLESALE Live and Dressed POULTRY 

240 DAVIS STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



February, 194^ 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 43 



This report, compared to the latest fiscal report, June, 
1944, shows some interesting contrasts: Deaths from burns, 
4; crushing, 5; drowning, 23; electrocution, 1; stab wound 
1 ; gunshot wound, 3 ; automobile injuries, 1 1 ; dynamite and 
other explosions, 5 ; falls, 1 1 ; lightning, 2 ; trains, 5 ; trucks 
and tractors, 2; homicidal, knife, 5; suicides, 6; and those 
found to be from natural causes, 26. During that fiscal 
year the Canal Zone Police made 8,525 arrests. 

The most arrests made by this organization in any one 
year, was during fiscal year 1942 when 11,293 arrests 
were made. During this year, however, there was a great 
influx of outside labor, both from the United States and 
other countries, employed on emergency war construc- 
tion measures. 

Canal Zone towns are, on the whole, peaceful and quiet, 
law-abiding communities. The residents are, on the aver- 
age, unquestionably of a higher type than found in other 
communities anywhere in the United States of similar 
size, simply because all residents are Government em- 
ployees, their families, or individuals connected in some 
way with the maintenance and operation of the Panama 
Canal. No one else is allowed to reside in the Zone and 
all realize that their conduct in every day life is one of the 
important prerequisites of the position they hold with 
Uncle Sam. 

The Canal Zone is clean and healthful. There are no 
slums, no saloons, no gambling houses or other outside evil 
influences which make the maintenance of peace in similar 
size communities in the United States comparatively dif- 
ficult. 

The Chief of Police is charged with the maintenance 
of peace and order required by the laws of the Canal 
Zone, the protection of life and property, and as keeper 
of common jails and warden of the Canal Zone Peniten- 
tiary, he is responsible for the proper care and custody 
of prisoners and convicts. He is coroner of the Canal Zone. 

The several hundred men on the Canal Zone Police 
Force carry out these mandates well. Canal Zonians take 
pride in the men on the force and the force takes pride 
in the manner in which they discharge their duties.- 

Phon- TRinidad 4916 

GHENT BRAND MFG., INC., LTD. 

Pure Prepared Mustard - Worcestershire Sauce 

6443 FOOTHILL BOULEVARD OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone OLympic 2856 



State and City License 



CLIFF GATES 

GENERAL PAINT'NG CONTRACTOR 
Compensation Insurance - Public Liability - Property Damage 

808 52nd STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Y. L, CHAN HERB CO. 

2340 TELEGRAPH AVENUE OAKLAND. CALIF. 

CROWN HEADWEAR MFG. CO. 



1553 SAN PABLO AVENUE 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone Piedmont 4587 



Bill Gallagher 



4092 CLUB 

"Where Good Friends Meet" 



Phone RAndolph 9733 

NORGARD'S SUPER X SERVICE 



4334 MISSION STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



RAndolph 683 1 



Frank Biancalana, Prop. 



FRANK'S PLACE 

NAME YOUR DRINK 

369 OCEAN AVENUE. Cor San Jose SAN FRANCISCO 

ELkridge 03 16 A. Ferrari. Prop. 

EXCELSIOR FRUIT MARKET 

GROCERIES - FRUITS - VEGETABLES 
BEER - WINES 

4596 MISSION ST.. at Brazil SAN FRANCISCO 



BELL CLEANERS AND DYERS 

NAVY TWO-DAY SERVICE 

1534 PARK STREET ALAMEDA. CALIF. 

Telephone LAkehurst 2-9766 George Panos, Proprietor 

Alameda Sea Cave & Steak House 

SERVING GOOD FOOD AT MODERATE PRICES 

15 18 WEBSTER STREET ALAMEDA, CALIF. 



LAkehurst 2-9976 



Jaines A. Delmore 



SEEBACK'S PLACE 



15 02 WEBSTER STREET 



ALAMEDA. CALIF. 



Phone DEIaware I 154 



Mario Bruzzone, Prop. 



MARIO'S 

ITALIAN DELICACIES 
Imported and Domestic Groceries — Poultry — Liquors 

45 13 MISSION STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



DE!a 



3259 



Alterations. Repairing — We call and deliver 



Amazon Park Cleaners 8C Laundry 

J. B. Garzot. Prop. 
Curtains, Draperies, Carpets a Specialty. Hats Cleaned & Blocked 

1107 NAPLES STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



MARSTRINI MARKET 

The Best Fruits and Vegetables of All Kinds 

4501 MISSION STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone RAndolph 2760 -2761 



Quality and Service 



Granada Grocery & Fruit Market 

Quality Fru:ts, Vegetables, Poultry, Fish — Free Delivery 

4638 MISSION ST.. In Excelsior Meat Market SAN FRANCISCO 



EDIBLE FISH MEALS & OILS 



369 PINE STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone DOuglas 7 184 Gilbert G. Longtin. Owner-Manager 

DANIEL G. LONGTIN CO. 

Diamond Core Drill Contracting 

690 MARKET STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Compl'ments of 

METHODIST PUBLISHING HOUSE 

"Good Books of All Pub'ishers" 

85 McAllister street san francis^i^ 



Phone Fillmore 3535 



The Best Sine- 1906 



4092 PIEDMONT AVENUE 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



YCRE FRENCH BAKERY 

THE HOME OF CRISP ROLLS 

1923-25 FILLMORE STREET SAN FRA'-'dSro 



Page 44 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Fehr 



1945 



COAST GUARD'S VOLUNTEER PORT 
SECURITY WINS PRAISE 

High tribute to the effective service being rendered by 
the Coast Guard's Volunteer Port Security Force in San 
Francisco and other parts of the country has been paid 
by Vice Admiral Waesche, Commandant of the U. S. 
Coast Guard. 

"Not a single serious loss has been suffered in any 
facility that has been under the protection of the Volun- 
teer Temporary Reserve of the U. S. Coast Guard," he 
told a recent conference of Temporary Reserve command- 
ing officers. 

Admiral Wacsche's remarks and his emphasis on the 
continued need of volunteer service throughout the war 
have been cited by the officers of the San Francisco regi- 
ment in support of their efforts to keep the local organiza- 
tion up to maximum strength. 

Nevi? recruits are needed, they explain, because of per- 
sonnel losses due to moving, shifting business demands, and 
the like, of members of the Regiment. That the Regiment 
must be kept to maximum strength is emphasized the 
more, they say, because of San Francisco's steadily grow- 
ing importance as a port of embarkation. 

Recruiting is taking place at Coast Guard headquarters 
in the Appraisers Building, Washington and Sansome 
Streets; DOuglas 0842, extension 276. 



TECHNICAL FISHERIES CO. 



1332 EVANS AVENUE 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone Richmond 3289 Tub Baths and Showers Steam Heated 



BAY BRIDGE AUTO COURT 

Hotel Accommodations - Strictly Modem 
20 Minutes to San Francisco, Via Bay Bridge 



2024 SAN PABLO AVENUE 



EL CERRITO. CALIF. 



Phone LAndscape 5-3911 



State Wreckers No. 73958 



CARROLL WREOCING CO. 

New and Used Building Material For Complete Home 



1344 SAN PABLO AVENUE 



EL CERRITO. CALIF. 



Phone LAndscape 5-9940 



CERRITO CLUB 



448 SAN PABLO AVENUE 



EL CERRITO, CALIF. 











^^W 9fa^ SSem^ . . . Me r^e/ea/Wi^^Sna4 ^tft 

^|^te%^ Join the 1945 
^^^Plf Christmas Treasure Plan 
^w^^ of The San Francisco Bank 




THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

SAVINGS Inc. Fih. 10, 1868 ■ MmbiT Ftdiral Dipcsit Ins. Corp. TRUST 

526 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 

SEVEN P F I C E S — EAC H A COMPLETE BANK 









Febr 



194) 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 4T 



M AND L 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE AND DANCING 
979 SAN PABLO AVE. ALBANY. CALIF. 



400 CLUB 

where Good Fellows Meet 



400 29TH AVENUE 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



KATIE'S PLACE 

A Good Place to Eat Good Food at Reasonable Prices at All Times. 

If You Try Us Once, You Will Come Back 
170! EAST I4lh STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 



JIM'S PLACE 



Where Good Fellows Meet 
WE SERVE THE BEST LIQUORS, WINE AND BEER 

1038 12th STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 



660 CLUB 

A NICE FIENDLY PLACE TO GO 
All Kinds of Liquor and Mixed Drinks 

660 12th STREET OAKL.4ND, CALIF. 



BOWL FOR HEALTH AT 

THE FRUITVALE BOWL 

THE HOUSE OF HOSPITALITY 



A. A. Moss. Mgr. 



Phone BErkeley 870'! F. M. Avalos. Prop. 

FRANK AND LEO'S 

MIXED DRINKS 



2600 SAN PABLO .A\E. 



BERKELEY. CALIF. 



Phone BErkeley 6012 

H & H BUILDING SUPPLIES 



CABINETS OUR SPECIALTY 



1325 SAN PABLO AVE. 



BERKELE-l'. CALIF. 



BErkeley 8966 ■Bochie". Manager 

GOLDEN GATE BUFFET 

COCKTAILS 

2524 SAN PABLO AVE. BERKELEY. CALIF. 

Phone .AShberry 1433 

FAMILY MARKET 

IMPORTED AND DOMESTIC GROCERIES 
MEATS - FRUITS - VEGETABLES - CHOICE WINES - LIQUORS 

2619 SAN PABLO A\E. BERKELEY. CALIF. 

KEIIog 4. 2533 L. F. Freese 

LATHE WORK AND BRASS FINISHING 



163 3 EAST 1 4th STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phones: Shop BE 6603 — Res. WC 2570 F. F. (Doc) Linn 

ACME MANUFACTURING COMPANY 

WELDING EQUIPMENT — STEEL FABRICATION 

1445 SAN PABLO AVENUE BERKELEY 2. CALIF. 

THornwall 42 3 5 

SECURITY MARKET 

MEAT - POULTRY - FISH - VEGETABLES 
255 1 SAN PABLO AVENUE BERKELEY. CALIF. 

Phone THornwall 244 7 

DWIGHT WAY RESTAURANT 

GOOD FOOD — QUICK SERVICE 
2613 SAN PABLO AVE. BERKELEY. CALIF. 



TRANSFER INN 



WE SERVE THE BEST OF LIQUORS 

Pleasant Gatherings 
2293 EAST 14th STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone KEIIog 2-1772 

BROOKLYN FRENCH LAUNDRY 



3 85 9 FRUITVALE AVE. 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



KEIIog 4-5524 



3760 E. I4th STREET 



COZY CORNER 

Lee Dugan. Owner 

OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone FRuitvale 9891 



^X'm. Ackerman & Herman Schmidt 



OLD CORNER INN 

Formerly Old Heidelberg Inn 
Choice Wines, Beer and Liquor^ — Merchants' Lunch 

3449 EAST 14th STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 

Compliments of 

WESTERN TRANSPORT CO. 



3014 CHAPMAN STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



KEIIog 4-0652 



A. Jenson 



BAY CITY FORGE CO. 



1038 23RD AVENUE 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



KEIIog 2-5937 

N. NICKELSON 

LIQUOR - WINE - BEER 

4965 SAN LEANDRO ST. O.AKLAND, CALIF. 

When you're hungry and need a place to park your trailer, come to 

SEMINARY AVE. TRAILER COURT 



Phone SWeetwood 668 7 



1083 SEMINARY AVE. 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone L.A 2-2628 



The Best in Alameda 



ALEXANDER SHOE REPAIR SERVICE 

SHOE REPAIRING WHILE YOU WAIT 

A. V. Alexander. Gen. Mgr. 
232 1 SANTA CLARA AVE ALAMEDA, CALIF. 

Phones: LAkehurst 2-6640 Res. S\V 7524 C. Midence 

CASTRO VALLEY POULTRY STORE 

POULTRY AND RABBITS FRESH DAILY 

1306 PARK ST.. ALAMEDA 97 15 E ST., OAKLAND 



GATE INN 

WINE AND LIQUORS OF ALL KINDS 

5 696 SAN PABLO AVE. O.AKL.AND, CALIF. 

LEO MORAN MACHINE WORKS 



6365 SAN PABLO AVENUE 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone LAkehurst 2-4090 



P. Laplace. Prop. 



ALAMEDA FRENCH BAKERY 



1416 PARK AVENUE 



ALAMEDA. CALIF. 



ANdover 8418 



SMITH MOTOR CO. 



Ray Smith 



USED CARS BOUGHT AND SOLD 
Portable Welding Machines — Repairs to All Makes of Cars 

1632 EAST 14th STREET OAKLAND 6. CALIF. 



Page 44 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Feb 



ruary, 



1945 



\ 



COAST GUARD'S VOLUNTEER PORT 
SECURITY WINS PRAISE 

High tribute to the effective service being rendered by 
the Coast Guard's Volunteer Port Security Force in San 
Francisco and other parts of the country has been paid 
by Vice Admiral Waesche, Commandant of the U. S. 
Coast Guard. 

"Not a single serious loss has been suffered in any 
facility that has been under the protection of the Volun- 
teer Temporary Reserve of the U. S. Coast Guard," he 
told a recent conference of Temporary Reserve command' 
ing officers. 

Admiral Waesche's remarks and his emphasis on the 
continued need of volunteer service throughout the war 
have been cited by the officers of the San Francisco regi' 
ment in support of their efforts to keep the local organiza- 
tion up to maximum strength. 

Nev.' recruits are needed, they explain, because of per- 
sonnel losses due to moving, shifting business demands, and 
the like, of members of the Regiment. That the Regiment 
must be kept to maximum strength is emphasised the 
more, they say, because of San Francisco's steadily grow- 
ing importance as a port of embarkation. 

Recruiting is taking place at Coast Guard headquarters 
in the Appraisers Building, Washington and Sansome 
Streets: DOuglas 0842, extension 276. 



TECHNICAL FISHERIES CO. 



1332 EVANS AVENUE 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone Richmond 3289 Tub Baths and Showers Steam Heated 



BAY BRIDGE AUTO COURT 

Hotel Accommodations - Strictly Modern 
20 Minutes to San Francisco, Via Bay Bridge 



2024 SAN PABLO AVENUE 



EL CERRITO. CALIF. 



Phone LAndscape 3-3911 



State Wreckers No. 73958 



CARROLL WRECKING CO. 

New and Used Building Material For Complete Home 



I344 SAN PABLO AVENUE 



EL CERRITO. CALIF. 



Phone LAndscape 5-9940 



CERRITO CLUB 



448 SAN PABLO AVENUE 



EL CERRITO. CALIF. 











^^^^ Join the 1945 
^^^^1 Christmas Treasure Plan 
^w^r of The San Francisco Bank 




THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

SA VINGS Inc. Fib. 10, 1868 ■ Member Federal Deposit Ins. Corp. TR UST 

526 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 
SEVEN F FIC ES— EAC H A COMPLETE BANK 









February, 1945 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 4i 



M AND L 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE AND DANCING 



979 SAN PABLO AVE. 



ALBANY. CALIF. 



KATIE'S PLACE 

A Good Place to Eat Good Food at Reasonable Prices at All Times. 
If You Try Us Once, You Will Come Back 

1701 EAST Uth STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 



JIM'S PLACE 

Where Good Fellows Meet 
WE SERVE THE BEST LIQUORS, WINE AND BEER 

1038 12th STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 



660 CLUB 



A NICE FIENDLY PLACE TO GO 

All Kinds of Liquor and Mixed Drinks 

660 I2th STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 



BOWL FOR HEALTH AT 



A. A. Moss. Mgr. 



THE FRUITVALE BOWL 



THE HOUSE OF HOSPITALITY 



Phone BErkeley 8704 F. M. Avalos. Prop. 

FRANK AND LEO'S 

MIXED DRINKS 

2600 SAN PABLO AVE. BERKELEY. CALIF. 

Phone BErkeley 6012 

H & H BUILDING SUPPLIES 

CABINETS OUR SPECIALTY 
1325 SAN PABLO AVE. BERKELEY. CALIF. 

BErkeley 8966 ■■Bochie". Manager 

GOLDEN GATE BUFFET 

COCKTAILS 

2524 SAN PABLO AVE. BERKELEY. CALIF. 

Phone AShberry 1433 

FAMILY MARKET 

IMPORTED AND DOMESTIC GROCERIES 
MEATS - FRUITS - VEGETABLES - CHOICE WINES - LIQUORS 
2619 SAN PABLO AVE. BERKELE'i'. CALIF. 

KEllog 4-2533 L. F. Freese 

LATHE WORK AND BRASS FINISHING 

1633 EAST 14th STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 

Phones: Shop BE 6603 — Res. WC 2570 F. F. ( Doc ) Linn 

ACME MANUFACTURING COMPANY 

WELDING EQUIPMENT — STEEL FABRICATION 
1445 SAN PABLO AVENUE BERKELEY 2. CALIF. 

THornwall 4235 

SECURITY MARKET 

MEAT - POULTRY - FISH - VEGETABLES 

2551 SAN PABLO AVENUE BERKELEY. CALIF. 

Phone THornwall 244 7 

DWIGHT WAY RESTAURANT 

GOOD FOOD — QUICK SERVICE 
2613 SAN PABLO AVE. BERKELEY. CALIF. 



TRANSFER INN 



WE SERVE THE BEST OF LIQUORS 

Pleasant Gatherings 
2293 EAST 14th STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 



400 CLUB 

Where Good Fellows Meet 

400 29TH AVENUE OAKLAND. CALIF. 

Phone KEllog 2-1772 

BROOKLYN FRENCH LAUNDRY 



3 85 9 FRUITVALE AVE. 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



KEllog 4-5524 



3760 E. 14th STREET 



COZY CORNER 

Lee Dugan, Owner 

OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone FRuitvale 9891 



Wm. Ackerman & Herman Schmidt 



OLD CORNER INN 

Formerly Old Heidelberg Inn 
Choice Wines, Beer and Liquor^ — Merchants' Lunch 

3449 EAST 14th STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 

Compliments of 

WESTERN TRANSPORT CO. 



3014 CHAPMAN STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



KEllog 40652 



A. Jenson 



BAY CITY FORGE CO. 



1038 23RD AVENUE 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



KEllog 2-5937 



N. NICKELSON 



LIQUOR - WINE - BEER 

4965 SAN LEANDRO ST. OAKLAND. CALIF. 

When you're hungry and need a place to park your trailer, come to 

SEMINARY AVE. TRAILER COURT 

Phone SWeetwood 668 7 
1083 SEMINARY AVE. OAKLAND. CALIF. 

Phone LA 2-2628 The Best in Alameda 

ALEXANDER SHOE REPAIR SERVICE 

SHOE REPAIRING WHILE YOU WAIT 

A. V. Alexander. Gen. Mgr. 
2321 SANTA CLARA AVE ALAMEDA. CALIF. 



Phones: LAkehurst 2-6840 Res. SW 7524 



G. Midence 



CASTRO VALLEY POULTRY STORE 

POULTRY AND RABBITS FRESH DAILY 

1306 PARK ST.. ALAMED.A 9715 E ST.. OAKLAND 

GATE INN 

WINE AND LIQUORS OF ALL KINDS 

5696 SAN PABLO AVE. OAKLAND. CALIF. 

LEO MORAN MACHINE WORKS 



6565 SAN PABLO AVENUE 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone LAkehurst 2-4090 



P. Laplace. Prop. 



ALAMEDA FRENCH BAKERY 



14 16 P.ARK AVENUE 



ALAMEDA. CALIF. 



ANdover 8418 



SMITH MOTOR CO. 



Ray Smith 



USED CARS BOUGHT AND SOLD 
Portable Welding Machines — Repairs to All Makes of Cars 

1632 EAST Uth STREET OAKLAND 6. CALIF. 



Page 48 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Februarv, 1945 



be faced hy our American boys now in Japanese prison 
camps. 

"It is our belief that cheerful co-operation with the 
Army program will be in furtherance of our war effort 
and in keeping with our war purposes and our duty as 
American citizens." 

You are urged to consider carefully the policies reflected 
in the statement, to faithfully follow them and, in the in- 
terests of all of our people and the war effort, to join 
with your fellow peace officers in preserving and promot- 
ing the rights of all our people. 

The speaker gave it as his opinion that this advisory 
committee was one of the best agencies for law enforce- 
ment in the State, and should be maintained. He said 
through this agency the enforcement of the laws could 
he made a profession in every sense of the word, and 
that those engaged in it would have a higher regard for 
their responsibilities. He pointed out that the Advisory 
Committee had done great work in ironing out the recent 
police radio question, had taken the lead in presenting a 
plan for meeting juvenile delinquency and had brought 
about the formation of the newly installed State Depart- 
ment of Justice, with Attorney General Robert Kenny 
its head. It has also increased the powers of the State 
Bureau of Identification and that agency has charge of 
the assembling of statistics pertaining to law enforcement. 

The standardization of law enforcement in this State 
is becoming more and more necessary, and many com- 
munities he claimed have taken steps to embrace the pro- 
visions of the mutual aid plan. 

Sheriff Gleason of Alameda announced his county has 
taken to the Mutual Aid Plan, and Chief Duella said the 
Board of Supervisors had promised to enact the necessary 
procedure that would put the San Francisco Police De- 
partment into the movement in every detail. 

Following Mr. McGettigan's address. Chief Dullea 
pointed out the prospects of friction as the Japs return to 
this coast, and said it was up to the peace officers to give 
Japanese who have American citizenship every protec- 
tion the laws of the land entitle them to have. 

Sheriff Murphy impressed on the members the neces- 
sity of maintaining law and order regarding the Japs to 
show our Americanism by giving them their rights under 
the constitution. 

Sheriff Murphy and Captain McDonald both thanked 
Chief Doran for the excellent luncheon furnished and 
for the warm welcome extended, and expressed the hopes 
that the Associattion would be invited again to meet in 
Alameda. 



Phone OLympic 7914 



Res. Phone THornwall 7153 



MORRIS SAW WORKS 

Planing Mill Supplies — Lawn Mowers Sharpened — Tool Grinding 

Saw Filing — Steel Tapes Repaired — Grinding and Repairing of all 

Descriptions 

653 1 SAN PABLO AVE. OAKLAND. CALIF. 



G. Myers, Manager 



Phone OLympic 6847 



MYERS BARREL COMPANY 

REDWOOD WATER TANKS — DRUMS ALL SIZES 



6563 SAN PABLO AVE. 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Oakland Office Phone HU 6440 - 6441 



California Wholesale Grocery Company 

EVERYTHING IN THE 
GROCERY AND RESTAURANT SUPPLY 



5652 SAN PABLO AVE. 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



GUARANTEED TIRES 



OLympic 9746 



Northern Tire 8C Rubber Co. 

Manufacturers of 
Remolded and Rebuilt Tires — Wholesalers of New Tires and Tubes 



5433 SAN PABLO AVE. 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phones Piedmont 1967- 1968 



NELDAM'S DANISH BAKERY 

FANCY PASTRY, TARTS & COOKIES 
Birthday, Wedding and Party Cakes to Order 



342 1 TELEGRAPH AVE. 



OAKLAND. CALIF 



Phone TEmplebar 4! 46 



RUBBER SALVAGE CO. 

USED and REBUILT TIRES 
Guaranteed Recapping - Wholesale and Retail 



2824 SAN PABLO AVE. 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone LA 2-9757 



The Riptide Hotel and Tavern 

Frank and Thelma Mertens 



1546 WEBSTER ST. 



ALAMEDA, CALIF. 



Phone 393 1 



Tony Fernande 



BROILER INN 

We Specialize in Charcoal Steaks and Fried Chicken 

2810 SAN PABLO AVENUE. Cor. Church Lane SAN PABLO, CALIF. 



THE FIRESIDE 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE 



1453 WEBSTER STREET 



ALAMEDA, CALIF. 



OAKS LIQUOR STORE 

We Carry All Kinds of Good Liquors and Wines 
911 SAN PABLO AVENUE RICHMOND. CALIF. 



JOHN'S RENDEZVOUS 

We Serve the Best Liquors and Wines 

2 102 SAN PABLO AVENUE EL CERRITO. CALIF. 



Febniarv, 1945 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 49 



OAKLAND POLICE AERO CLUB 

(Continued from Page 11) 
forth with an official insignia — a police star with OPD 
on it — which they proudly painted on the wings of their 
flagship. 

As they accumulated flying time, they practised aerial 
policing routine, going out in pairs, with one acting as 
pilot and the other as observer. They pursued automo- 
biles down the highways, spotted fires in the hills, 
"dragged" the back country for lost children, and searched 
they bay shore for imaginary bodies. 

After seven months of winging the Waco about the 
bay region, The Oakland Police Aero Club decided to sell 
it and buy a faster plane that would go places. They sold 
it at a loss of $400 to a Jap, who promptly killed himself 
while practising for a flight back to his homeland. 

The club then embarked upon what they recorded as 
"the stormy career of the Barling NB (Nuts and Bolts — " 
— their severest financial headache. A new type long- 
wing monoplane powered by a cantankerous 6'i -horse- 
power engine and boasting a speed of 100 miles an hour 
when it felt like flying. The craft was the creation of 
Walter Barling, designer of the Barling bomber. 

The flying police saw an ad announcing the plane, liked 
its looks, promptly bought it by mail at a cost of $J,600. 
The subsequent stormy career, which extended over three 
years, spotted with frequent rebuilds made necessary by 
forced landings and general falling apart of the machinery, 
cost them a total of $t,198.2^. This they figured out the 
other day, was $44 per flying hour. 

With their number two flagship, which also boasted 
the OPD star insignia, they took turns in flying about 
northern California and even to Los Angeles to gain cross- 
country experience. These trips always were interesting 
because the plane never failed to act up at the most em- 
barassing moment. 

For instance, Calame was flying down the coast aiming 
at Santa Maria and en route performing an imaginary 
police mission of the future. Flying low to track down a 
criminal, he pulled up to pass over a hill and the engine 
suddenly started to cut out. He nosed the plane down 
and turned back in a hurry and then took another run at 
it, but with the same result. Four more tries and "Old 
Nuts and Boldts" still stubbornly refused to soar above 
that hill, so Calame had to turn and fly back to Oakland 
airport. Reedy flew to Los Angeles a short time later, but 
he took Calame's advice and followed a route that didn't 
pass over that hill near Santa Maria. 

The stormy career ended August 21, 1932, when the 



Phone Richmond 866 



NEW CITY MARKET 



C. FILICE, Prop. 



COR SAN PABLO and POTRERO AVENUES EL CERRITO, CALIF. 
Phone LAndscape 5-7536 An Apex Paint for Every Purpose 



APEX PAINT COMPANY 

MANUFACTURERS 



1201 SAN PABLO AVENUE 



RICHMOND, CALIF. 



Phone Richmond 505 



Fred F. Conwill 



TRADEWAY STORES 



THINGS FOR THE HOME 



1230 SAN PABLO AVENUE 



EL CERRITO. CALIF. 



Phone Richmond 32 17 



BLUE BELL AUTO COURT 



732 SAN PABLO AVENUE 



RICHMOND, CALIF. 



Compliments of 



ANDREW WILLIAMS STORES 



1900 SAN PABLO AVENUE 



EL CERRITO. CALIF. 



Phone LAndscape 5.9984 



QUALITY FOOD CENTER 

Full Line of Groceries - Good Service - Prices Reasonable 



430 SAN PABLO AVEINUE 



EL CERRITO. CALIF. 



McGUIRE COMPANY 

BARRELS and DRUMS 
S'nce 1880 



OSCAR'S 



R. MONSON 



GENERAL CONTRACTOR 



3285 LAKESHORE AVENUE 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



2525 McBRYDE AVENUE 



RICHMOND. CALIF. 



THE DEPOT PLACE 

GOLDEN HOUSE - COCKTAILS 
EAST FOURTEENTH and FRUITVALE AVENUE OAKLAND 1005 FRUITVALE AVENUE 



COLONEL'S BUFFET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Page 50 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



February, 1945 



plane wound up its days in a tangled mass of broken 
wings, twisted fuselage and spilled salmon in an Indian's 
tent on the hanks of the Klamath river. Reedy was the 
pilot on that last flight. He had flown to a Requa cow 
pasture on an aerial fishing expedition and was trying to 
fly back with his catch when it happened. 

"I was working the 4 to 12 watch so I had to get away 
early in the morning," he recalls. "That was bad because 
there was no wind that time of day and the cow pasture 
didn't off^er much of a takeoff^ run. Also. I made the mis- 
take of not believing in signs, something my trafiic ex- 
perience has since impressed upon me as most important. 
The sign on the baggage compartment of the plane read: 
'limit, H pounds.' I ignored it and gleefully stowed in 
6^ pounds of salmon and my fishing gear. 

"I waited for a while for the wind to pick up, but it 
didn't. Finally, I got ants for fear I would be late getting 
on watch, so I decided to take a chance. 

"Half way down the pasture I felt I wasn't going to 
make it, but I was going too fast to stop short of the 
fence. I kept on, and the next thing a stump loomed up 
in front of the nose. I hauled back on the stick, and the 
plane staggered over it. Right away it started to settle, 
and I knew I was sunk. I fought with it to keep from 
hitting the fence and other assorted barriers that cropped 
up on the horizon. The next think I knew I was laying 
out on the crumpled wing. That, in turn, was laying across 
a bed flattened out in the wreckage of an Indian fisher- 
man's tent. The Indian was tanding over me scratching his 
head. Salmon and the rest of the plane were scattered all 
over the place. The Indian had hopped out of bed when 
he heard the sputtering plane streaking toward him. 

"I didn't get a scratch, but one look convinced me the 
plane was at the end of its stormy career. In behalf of the 
Oakland Police Aero Club, I gave the wreckage to the 
Indian. I don't know what he ever did with it, but it is a 
cinch he never flew it." 

Later the flying policemen bought a third plane, a 
Monocoupe, which turned out to have a "lemon" motor, 
warped "barrels" and other ailments. After a couple of 
months of battling to cure these ills, they sold it to a 
fellow in Montana. That was early in 19.>3 and the OPD 
star insignia hasn't been seen in the sky since. 

"Maybe we'll take it back upstairs after the war — who 
knows?" muse the veterans Reedy, Calame and Mor- 
genthal. 



BARGAIN SPOT 

Mrs. Esther Miller, Prop. 
2518 SAN P.ABLO AVENUE BERKELEY. CALIF. 



COLONIAL BUFFET 

A NICE PLACE TO MEET 
1005 FRUiTVALE AVENUE OAKLAND. CALIF. 

OAKLAND EXCLUSIVE DYERS 



Phone LAkehust 5-9964 Tom Latronica 

RALPH'S PLACE 

601 SAN PABLO AVENUE ALBANY, CALIF. 



LOUIE'S CLUB 



One Block South of Betsy's Kitchen 

1728 SAN PABLO AVENUE EL CERRITO, CALIF. 

Phone Richmond 1065 

SIGNAL TRAILER COMPANY 

We Will Buy Your Trailer, Sell Your Trailer, Trade Your Trailer 
For a Larger Trailer 

1829-49 SAN PABLO AVENUE RICHMOND. CALIF. 



Phones: LAndscape 5 -32 72 ; Richmond 1 48 



Martin Griffin 



GRIFFIN LUMBER CO. 

LUMBER. DOORS. SASH, PIPE 

Wallboard - Plumbing Supplies 

1322 SAN PABLO AVENUE EL CERRITO. CALIF. 



Phone Richmond 2592 



W. B. While 



E- G. Conn 



MIRA VISTA DRUG COMPANY 

BARRETT and SAN SAN PABLO AVENUE RICHMOND, CALIF. 

CYPRESS INN 

BEER - SANDWICHES - CHILI 

15:9 SAN PABLO AVENUE EL CERRITO, CALIF. 

PAGO PAGO CLUB 

For a Good Time and Good Liquor 

752 SAN PABLO AVENUE ABANY. CALIF. 

Phone 2440 

PARADISE GARDENS 

JESSE COPPI LOUIS J. RISSO 

EL CERRITO CALIFORNIA 

MISSION INN 

BEER, WINE AND LIQUORS 
1614 SAN PABLO AVENUE ALBANY, CALIF. 

Phones: Albany 5-9906; Lakehurst 5-9906 

AL'S DOUGHNUT SHOP 

If you want Good, Fresh, Home-made Doughnuts, Come to Al's 

75 1 SAN PABLO AVENUE ALB.ANY. CALIF. 

Phone LAkehurst 2-9932 

"LA FIESTA" COCKTAIL LOUNGE 



1538 WEBSTER STREET 



ALAMEDA, CALIF. 



Phone Piedmont 9186 



Joe Vernetti 



164 7 A E 14th STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



VERNETTI'S TOWN HOUSE 

SCOTCH - WHISKIES - ALES - WINES 
5862 DOYLE STREET EMERYVILLE. CALIF. 



COX-WELLMAN, INC. 

AUTOMOTIVE PARTS - DISTRIBUTORS 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 

Compliments of 

GOLDEN PHEASANT 

POWELL and GEARY STREETS SAN FRANCISCO 



Feh 



ruaj-y, 



1945 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page SI 



MARIN COUNTY PEACE OFFICERS' 
ASSOCIATION 

The fifth annual meeting of the Marin County Peace 
Officers' Association was held at San Quentin, California, 
under the leadership of the newly-elected President J. 
Mansfield Lewis. The outgoing President, Warden Clin- 
ton T. Duffy, made elaborate arrangements for the in- 
duction of the new officers for the year 194^. The meeting 
was held on the 8th day of January 1945. 




Jas. M. Lewis 

Before presenting the gavel to the newly-elected Presi- 
dent, Duffy expressed his appreciation to the association 
for the cooperation which was given to him by the mem- 
bers which enabled the Warden to have the most success- 
ful year in the history of the Association. The Warden 
also stressed the important work that the members were 
doing and urged them all to give to the new president 
their utmost support; thus would the Association enjoy 
a more successful year in 1945. 

Brigadier General Victor Hansen of the California 
State Guard was the guest speaker. The General stressed 
the value and need for a company of the California State 
Guard in Marin County and asked the Law Enforcement 
Officers to be sponsors. The General outlined the purposes 
and the functions of the guard and also told how they 
would be equipped by the Western Defense Command. 
The guards function on a voluntary basis and only called 
into action when the condition demands. 

The General was accompanied by Colonel D. B. Miller, 
Lieutenant Colonel E. E. Foulkes, Lieutenant Colonel L. 
A. Worthington, Major Leon S. Winslow, Captain 
Robert M. Lee, and M Sergeant Walter Mails. 

The newly-elected officers for the year 1945 were: 

J. Mansfield Lewis, President. 

Thomas Wentworth, First Vice President. 

Chief Frank Kelly, Second Vice President. 

Judge John R. Flor, Secretary-Treasurer. 

President Lewis has been active in police work for many 



years and the spark plug for the police in Radio communi- 
cation. Last year he was the President of the Northern 
California Police Communication Officers' Association. 
Through the skill and endeavor of President Lewis, Marin 
County has one of the best communication systems in the 
Bay Area, and Lewis made possible the use of radio for 
police work in the county. He is very popular and has 
appointed his committees which will assure a very enter- 
taining, educational and beneficial year. 

Thomas Wentworth, First Vice President, has been in 
police work for almost 20 years — most of his time with 
the California Highway Patrol. He has shown a great 
interest in the organization. 

Chief Frank Kelly, Second Vice President, has years of 
experience as a police officer. He is Chief of Police of San 
Rafael. 

Judge John R. Flor, Secretary-Treasurer, has held this 
title for the past four years. He has, as city judge of 
Larkspur, carved himself a fine reputation as a magistrate. 
As Secretary-Treasurer of the Marin Peace Officers' As- 
sociation he has done more than any other member to 
bring it the success it is enjoying today. 

Office Phone ATwater 1360 N. Di Matteo. Owner and President 

When you want to buy or sell any Real Estate Property. See 

U. S. REALTY CO. 

Licensed Brokers - Rental Collection - Real Estate - Insurance 

3691 MISSION ST. {Spanish. Italian. French Spoken) SAN FRANCISCO 

Compliments of 



WHITE MOTOR CO. 



8th and HARRISON STREETS 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Compliments of 

UNITED CIGAR 'WHELAN STORES 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone HEmlock 69 10 



Sheet Iron and Heavy Plate Work 



Phone W.Alnut 6000 



MONTAGUE PIPE AND STEEL CO. 

Riveted and Welded Steel Pipe. Oil and Water Tanks, Stacks, 
Well Casing, Asphalt Dipping, Pipe Wrapping 

1999 THIRD STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Service from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. 
The Sign of Service 

BYINGTON ELECTRIC CO. 

Radios - Electricians - Electrical Wiring, Fixtures and Repairs 

1809 FILLMORE STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Compliments of 

Westinghouse Pacific Coast Brake Co. 

Bendix - Westinghouse Automatic Air Brake Co. 

I 101 MATSON BUILDING SAN FRANCISCO 



MITCHELL STEVEDORING COMPANY 

Contracting Stevedores 



PIER 18 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone HEmlock 4926 

R. A. HEACOCK 

EAGLE BATTERY CO. 
Storage Battery Manufacturers 

4 1 SHERIDAN STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone RAndoIph 99 7 5 



BAYSIDE MOTEL 



IN SAN FRANCISCO 
201 I BAYSHORE BLVD., at Hester, near Third St., SAN FRANCISCO 



Page n 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Fehrnarv, 194S 



RED CROSS WAR FUND 

Keep your Red Cross at his side. Never was this more 
important than today. Long after swords have been beaten 
into plowshares the Red Cross will have much to do. 

Even after the last gun has been fired many a month 
will pass before all our fighting men are home. Some will 
be confined in hospitals for long periods of recovery. 
Traditional Red Cross service for these men who have 
sacrificed so much must continue unabated. It is a sacred 
obligation delegated to your Red Cross. 

No less sacred is the obligation to stand by with all 
necessary aid while veterans of this war, now being re- 
turned to civil life, adjust themselves to new conditions, 
prepare to take their rightful places in field and factory. 

The refugees and waifs of war need help — help such 
as only the Red Cross is prepared to give in a war- 
scarred world. 

Though the roar of guns may cease, human needs re- 
main. The Red Cross can meet these only with your con- 
tinued generous support. The President has designated 
March as Red Cross Month, the period in which the 1945 
Red Cross War Fund will be raised. Red Cross activities 
are financed solely from voluntary contributions and gifts. 
We all must do our part. 



0/0nfi^ 




GIVE NOW... KEEP RED CROSS AT HIS SIDE 



! HELP WIN I 
I THE WAR J 




«- 

S!- 
£3- 

SO- 
«■ 



Buy More 

WAR 
BONDS 



■a 

■a 
■a 

-a 



ti-iiii-iiir-ti-kii^ir-^-ii-b-irtr^irti-ir-ifir-iririr-iiii^ii-iiiiir-ii-b'iriiii 



Compliments of 

YOSEMITE 
BEVERAGE CO. 

150 POTRERO 
SAN FRANCISCO 



COSTS 

iWithuvreach; 

OF ALL 

made possible by San Fran- 
( Cisco's largest clientele.^ 



The Original 

haEsted &C0 

1123 SUTTER • ORdway 300O 



i 



February, 1945 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page S3 



STATE'S NEW DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 

(Continued from page 12) 
plete charge of all litigation and other legal matters inci- 
dent to the liquidation of the Pacific States Savings and 
Loan Assocation as statutory legal counsel to the Building 
and Loan Commissioner. 
The Indian Claims 

By statutory enactment of the State of California in 
1927, and of the Congress of the United States in 1928, 
the Attorney General of California was empowered to 
act as counsel for 2 3,000 Indian plaintiffs. This had to do 
with their claims against the United States resulting from 
the failure of the Indians to secure the lands and services 
and goods promised them in unratified treaties which were 
negotiated-by their ancestors in IS^l and 1852. 

Last month a judgment of over five million dollars 
in their favor was stipulated to in the U. S. Court of 
claims. 

The Attorney General's office, from the standpoint of 
advice rendered, is undoubtedly one of the largest law 
offices in the country. In the course of a year the office 
rendered more opinions than the Supreme and Appellate 
Courts of the State. 

No other Attorney General's office in the Union ap- 
proaches the volume of legal opinions rendered by the 
California Attorney General. During the past biennium 
the Attorney General's office rendered 1,0.36 opinions to 
the various State departments and offices. 

The Attorney General, for the purpose of securing 
uniform approach of all laws, has instituted regional con- 
ferences of district attorneys on each even-numbered 
month and the sheriffs on each odd-numbered month. Con- 
ferences are called and members notified by the Attorney 
General who attends in person or is represented by an 
assistant. 

In 1943, the Attorney General offered an additional 
service to district attorneys. Bulletins reporting office 
opinions and court decisions to district attorneys are regu- 
larly issued. 

In 1943 the Attorney General inaugurated the publica- 
tion of opinions of his office in printed form. These are 
published monthly. 

Division of N.arcotic Enforcement 

On May 4, 1944, the Division of Narcotic Enforcement 
became a unit of Stae Government within the newly 



Phone DElaware 1095 



Mary & Tom Mitchell 



CASA BLANCA CAFE 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE— FINE WINES AND LIQUORS 
FAMOUS ITALIAN DINNERS OUR SPECIALTY 

2972 DIAMOND ST. SAN FRANCISCO 

Compliments of 



DINWIDDIE CONSTRUCTION CO. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone GRaystone 9 100 



FRANK EDWARDS CO. 

AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE DIVISION 
Distributors of Original Automotive Products 



1414 VAN NESS AVENUE 



SAN FRANCISCO 



BUY WAR BONDS 
AND STAMPS 

Phone GArfield 8724 

A. GIURLANI 8C BRO. 

FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC FOOD PRODUCTS 
Specializing in Olive Oils, Imported and Domestic Cheese 



537 FRONT STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone HEmlock 794 7 



PACIFIC BODY WORKS 



34-45 SHOTWELL STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



JULLIARD INCORPORATED 

WHOLESALERS and IMPORTERS 

Telephone YUkon 0110 



GREENWOOD-RAGGIO 8c CO. 



3 10 TOWNSEND STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone: TUxedo 2281 - 2282 - 2283 



1501 RUSS BUILDING 



SAN FRANCISCO 



TOM KYNE 



Compliments of 



D A S C O 



No. I OPAL PLACE. Off Taylor Street 
Between Turk and Market Streets 



SAN FRANCISCO 



WESTERN AUTO STORAGE CO. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 1035 MACDONALD AVENUE 



RICHMOND, CALIF. 



Page 54 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Fehrimrx, 1945 



created Department of Justice. This Division is headed 
by Chief Joseph O'Ferrall. 

The State Narcotic Act, which is enforced by the De- 
partment of Justice through the Division of Narcotic 
Enforcement, embraces all laws regulating the cultivation, 
production, sale, giving away, prescribing, administering, 
furnishing, or having in possession narcotic or other dan- 
gerous drugs, other certain enumerated drugs. 

Enforcement of regulations relating to the legal use of 
narcotic presents an important technical problem; this 
situation is handled through a control system whereby 
over 30,000 copies of narcotic prescriptions are received 
in the division office each month under provisions of the 
State Narcotic Act — which prescriptions are checked for 
authenticity and possible forgeries and other pertinent 
information. 

Since the outbreak of the war with Japan and the 
consequent close of that source of supply, a situation has 
developed, which has caused narcotic racketeers of this 
Nation to use Mexico very extensively as a source of 
supply for opium and its derivatives. Furthermore, during 
the past year there has been an increasingly large amount 
of opium coming back on the constant stream of vessels 
which have touched the Near East and other points where 
narcotics are freely available. 

In February, 1944, Commissioner Anslinger, United 
States Commissioner of Narcotics, Washington, D. C, 
addressed a letter to Chief O'Ferrall of the State Narcotic 
Enforcement Division, when acknowledging receipt of the 
Division's Annual Report for the year 1943, which stated 
in part: "Your State ranks first in narcotic law enforce- 
ment work." 

Division of Investigation 

The Division of Investigation fully co-operates with 
local district attorneys when their aid is requested and 
investigates a wide miscellany of complaints received from 
various sources. This Division is headed by Chief Joseph 
H. McClelland whose headquarters are in Sacramento. 

Among some of the high-lighted investigations made 
by the Division recently are: 

1. Trends and origin of juvenile delinquency. 

2. Intensive investigation of all State prisons and rcform- 
itories in California at the request of the Governor, lead- 
Phone BErkeley 9264 S. L. McFarland. Own. - Benny Owings, Mgr. 

SAN PABLO BOWL 

UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT 



1631 SAN PABLO AVENUE 



BERKELEY, CALIF. 



CHANSLOR 8C LYON CO. 



OAKLAND EAST OAKLAND BERKELEY HAYWARD 



GRAND MARKETS 



Al Mortara, Prop. 



1100 23rd 220 So. Sixth 

1901 Barrett 23rd & Cutting 

45th & Cutting 

RICHMOND CALIF. 



Telephone KEllog 2-3811 

J. CATUCCI 

GRADING & EXCAVATING 
CONTRACTOR 

Office and Yards : 

1212 Eighteenth Avenue 

Oakland, Calif. 

Garden Loam and Fill 

WE RENT- 
AIR COMPRESSORS 
TRAILERS 
TRACTORS 
TRUCKS 



Febr 



194? 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 55 



ing up to the special legislation creating the new Depart- 
ment of Corrections. 

3. Inquiry into allegations that certain prize fights had 
been "fixed." 

4. Assisting in investigations of "zoot-suit" riots in 
Southern California. 

^. Investigating into matters pertaining to the farm 
council. 

6. Tule Lake. Investigating the riots there early m the 
year at the request of Governor Warren. 

7. Japanese Alien Land Law violations. Department of 
Justice investigators fully collaborated with local district 
attorneys in assisting in the prosecution of numerous cases 
throughout California with the view to escheat property 
to the State. 

This division is headed by Chief Charles Stone. His 
headquarters are in Sacramento. 

This division keeps on file hundreds of thousands of 
finger prints and acts as a service agency to law enforce- 
ment officials throughout California. In having a central 
clearing house of finger print records, the Division has 
assisted local law enforcement officers in the solution of 
an extremely large number of felonies. 

Records are kept by this Division as to all revolvers 
and pistols sold and a record of licenses by local police 
officers. 

The Division also maintains records of stolen property 
reports. 

The State teletype system is maintained by this Division 
for immediate communication service between the head- 
quarters office in Sacramento and all parts of the State. 

Laboratories are maintained by this Division for the 
detection of handwriting frauds and handwriting identi- 
fication, as well as laboratories for chemical, ballistical and 
microscopical examinations. 

I am very grateful in acknowledging the splendid and 
loyal co-operation I have had from all the employees and 
heads of the various groups which came into our new 
Department of Justice. 



Phone BErkeley 5 177 



Under New Management 



BERKELEY STEAM BATHS 

Public Baths and Privte Compartments - Scientific Massage 

Open daily except Mondays 12 noon to 1 1 p.m. 
Sunday 9 a.m. to 12 noon - Come and Bring Family 



1911 1 0th STREET 



BERKELEY. CALIF. 



Phone TRinidad 0168 



N. R. S 



wanson 



C. H. Anderson 



RAY'S DRUG STORE 

Prescription Service - Complete Line of Drugs - Wines and Liquors 

Open 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. 



7501 MacARTHUR BOULEVARD 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone Piedmont 9088 



John Zegras 



EMERYVILLE RECREATION CENTER 



TroTriro"a"o~6"4~6~o~ro~irnrrirTi~sTnririr5"r5innr5 

Associated-Banning 
Company 

CONTRACTING STEVEDORES I 



San Francisco and Los Angeles 



tipooooppooooooooooopocQQOQoocoogooaoaoo? 



Jusf say... "GOUGH AT MARKET' 



and you're there 



Shop the easy way. Streetcars J, K, L, M, N, 6, 7 and 17 stop 
in front of our door. 

Get a fine Fleecedown mattress at our easy to reach manufactur- 
ing store. Airflex, experts in sleeping needs, will advise and help 
you select the mattress exactly suited to you. 
If you drive we have a large free parking lot adjoining our store. 
Mattresses shipped free of charge to any railroad point in the 
United States. 

AIRFLEX 

EDWARD McROSKEY MATTRESS CO. 

1687 MARKET STREET ' SAN FRANCISCO 
Opposite Gough Street Free Parhing 



PLAY AND RELAX at... 




PLAYLAND 




at the BEACH 




Located at Ocean Beach near +he 
Cliff House and famed Seal R 


historic 
ocks. 


Home of Thrill-Provoking Rides ... Unique 
fronting the Blue Pacific ... Oceans of Fun 


Restaurants 
For Everyone! 


Owned and Operated by 

WHITNEY BROTHERS 





4 118 4 116'^ SAN PABLO AVENUE 



EMERYVILLE. CALIF. 



4 FLOOR SHOWS NIGHTLY 

SILVER CAFE 

Mario E. Martin 

• 

1205 Broadway 

456 Twelfth Street 

OAKLAND CALIF. 



Page 56 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



February, J 945' 



FBI NATIONAL POLICE ACADEMY 
CALIFORNIA GRADUATES FETED 

On January 10, 1945, the California Chapter of the 
FBI National Police Academy Association, held an infor- 
mal dinner and meeting in honor of Chief Robert E. 
O'Brien, San Mateo, California Police Department; Chief 
Frank Kelly, San Raefcl, California Police Department, 
and Chief Melvin Flohr, Santa Clara, California Police 
Department, recently returned graduates of the FBI Na- 
tional Police Academy at Washington, D. C. 

The meeting was well attended by graduates from the 
entire State of California. During the informal meeting 
there was an exchange of ideas on how to meet police 
problems in the post war period. 

Featured speakers of the evening were N. J. L. Pieper, 
Special Agent in Charge of the San Francisco FBI Office, 
and Captain Bernard McDonald of the San Francisco 
Police Department. 

Both Pieper and McDonald stated, "Law enforcement 
will meet a great test in the post war era". All in attend- 
ance agreed that more frequent meetings should be held 
and a committee was appointed for the planning and ar- 
ranging of future meetings. 

The following graduates of the FBI National Police 
Academy were in attendance: Lt. Lloyd R. Wendlend, 
Alameda Police Department; Lt. Addison H. Fording, 
Berkeley Police Department; Chief Roy Fraties, Carmel 
Poilce Department; Inspector George 'W. Keller, Oakland 
Police Department; Inspector Anthony J. Bolger, Oakland 
Police Department; Deputy Sheriff Floyd Heffron, Ala- 
meda County Sheriff's Office; Denzil Troute, Second Class 
Petty Officer, U. S. Navy Shore Patrol; Chief George 
Weight, Salinas Police Department; Sheriff 'Victor Tibbs, 
Monterey County; Criminologist Francis X. Latulipe, San 
Francisco Police Department; Captain John Engier, Secre- 
tary to Chief of Police, San Francisco Police Department; 
Lt. James L, English, San Francisco Police Department; 
Commander Oscar J. Jahnsen, Intelligence Division, U. S. 
Coast Guard; John Pippin, Specialist Second Class, U. S. 
Navy; Eugene S. Jones, Special Agent, FBI, San Francisco 
Field Division; Assistant Chief of Police F. F. Kaminsky, 
Sacramento, California; Chief Melvin Flohr, Santa Rosa, 
California; Chief Frank Kelly, San Rafael, California; 
Chief Robert E. O'Brien, San Mateo, California; Lt. Stan- 
hope Lineberry, U. S. Coast Guard, Intelligence; James 
Stockton, Special Agent, FBI, San Francisco Field Divi- 
sion; and Chief Deputy Sheriff Ray M. Andres, Madera, 
California. 



Phone Hlgate 1 ill 



WEST COAST WELDING COMPANY 



46 1 TWENTY-FIFTH STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone KEllog 3-5454 



BONDED 



LICENSED 



CARL T. PETERSEN 

CONCRETE CONTRACTOR 



2324 E 20lh STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Betty Lou 
Foods 



CALIFORNIA 
POTATO CHIP 
COMPANY 



386 FIFTH STREET 

Oakland, Calif. 



Comphments of 
A Friend 



BUY 

WAR BONDS 

and 

STAMPS 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



In Alameda Since 1933 

HENRY'S 
SUPER FORD SERVICE 

25 Years FORD - MERCURY - 
LINCOLN SPECL\LIST 



HENRY F.WIEMKEN 

(Formerly with Dietz Motor Co.) 



Complete Automotive Service. Dependable 
Used Cars. Ford, Mercury Motors Tuned, Re- 
built, Exchanged. Goodyear and Laher Bat- 
teries. Batteries charged while you wait. 



TWO SERVICE ENTRANCES 

1812 PARK STREET 

Also Around Corner on Eagle Street 

LAkehurst 3-3442 



Canal Steel 

Construction 

Company 



3743 Alameda Avenue 
Oakland, Calif. 



Johnson, Drake & 
Piper, Inc. 



General Contractors 



OAKLAND 



ALAMEDA 



PEERLESS IRON 
WORKS 

STEEL FABRICATION 

MACHINE WORK 

FORGE WORK 



Foot of Everett Street 

Alameda, California 

Phone LA 2-1073 



Sec 


. 562, P. L. & R. 


U 


S. POSTAGE 




PAID 


San 


Francisco, Calif. 




Permit 3172 



LAkehurst 3-3442 

HENRY'S 
SUPER FORD SERVICE 

FORD - MERCURY - LINCOLN 
SPECIALIST 

Complete Automotive Service. Dependable 
Used Cars. Two Service Entrances. 

Goodyear and Laher Batteries. 
Batteries charged while you wait. 

In Alameda Since 1933 



1812 PARK STREET 

Also Around the Corner on Eagle Avenue 

ALAMEDA, CALIF. 



PACIFIC COAST 
ENGINEERING COMPANY 

ENGINEERS 

STEEL FABRICATORS 

MACHINISTS 




ALAMEDA, CALIFORNIA 



Stohl, Ne!s S 

270 Claremont Blvd 
San Francisco, Cal 



Compliments 



flLBfRI'S 



The Friendly Store 



9th and MacDonald 
Richmond 



Members of 

Tavern Owners^ 
Association 

of Alameda 

Al's Place 1710 Lincoln Avenue 

Ernie's 1301 High Street 

Ben's Tavern Lincoln & Webster 

Seebeck's Place -1502 Webster Street 

The Hide Out 201 Pacific Avenue 

Fenced Inn 1225 Lincoln Avenue 

Island Club 23201/2 Santa Clara Avenue 

Jensen's Buffet 1539 Lincoln Avenue 

La Fiesta Lounge 1538 Webster Street 

M & F Buffet 1226 Lincoln Avenue 

Martin's 1431 Webster Street 

Pop's Inn 1515 Park Street 

The Buckhom Park Street at Encinal 

The Fireside 1453-A Webster Street 

Doc CroU's 1400 Webster Street 




n 



AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 

OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA 



PRIL 



194i 



BUY NOW FOR THE 




TH 



BIGGER 
WAR LOAN 

^li/uuuiU PcM/uUl SaUUUf^ 



M ¥ M 



STARTS MAY 14 . . . ENDS JUNE 30 



AN OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



MOLKENBUHR BROS. 

"REPUTATION EARNED" 





Seamon Molkenbuhr 



Val Molkenbuhr 



Distributors 

LENOX HALL JEWELRY 

Biltniore Luggage 
Entire Third Floor 

23 GRANT AVENUE 

opposite Magnin's 



Wm. Deardorff 
Engineerins and 
Machine Works 



647 PAGE STREET 
BERKELEY, CALIF. 
Ph. THornwall 6825 



In War as in Peace . . . 
THE MAIN LINE AIRWAY 

Today, along United's Main Line Airway, 
flows an endless stream of passengers and 
cargo vital to the war effort — military per- 
sonnel, essential civilian travelers, air mail 
and express. 

* 

Heavy "war traffic" such as this emphasizes 
the strategic importance of this famous air- 
way, which links together more than a score 
of the nation's greatest production centers — 
up and down the Coast, and from the Pacific 
to the Atlantic seaboards. 



UNITED AIR LINES 

A Partner in the Progress of 
The Pacific Coast 



Phone Vallejo 3-7669 

Refrigeration Engineers 

specializing in Refrigeration 

Modern Automatic Equipment for 

MOTOR RE-WINDING 

SALES SERVICE 



Air Conditioning and 

Commercial 

Refrigeration Engineers 

GENERAL ELECTRIC 
DISTRIBUTORS 

547 Maryland Street 
Vallejo, Calf. 



April. 194) 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 



Featured in This Issue 



Policing the Security Meet 

Bv Opie L. 'Warner 

Chief Donald Wood of San Anselmo . . 

Sergeant Albrecht Shot by Holdup Man 

One Little Town Did Something About It 
By Frederic\ Loomis, M. D. 

Chief Theuer of Burlingame 

Finger Records in Bible History . 
By Superinterident B. C. Bridges 

Post' War Police Problems 

By Chief Charles W. Dullea 

Meritorious Conduct Awards .... 

Vallejo Police Get Salary Raise .... 

Mill Valley Police Well Trained . . . 

Sausalito Crime Free 

Oakland Police Chief Tracy 

By B. S. (Sandy) Sanders .... 

Chief Kelly of San Rafael 

San Bruno Police Department .... 
Menlo Park's New Police Chief 



Page 

3 

4 
. 6 



Northern California Police Communication 
Officers' Association 

Bay Counties' Peace Officers' Association . 
Nation's Police Launch Brake Check Program . 
Chief Harper of Burlingame Retires .... 

San Carlos Police Chief 

Inspector Ed Hanley to New Job 

New Motorcycle Headquarters 

Chief Zink, New BCPOA President .... 

Hillsborough Well Policed 

Two Williams Brothers Pensioned 

Dutil S.F.P.D.'s Range Master 

Sheriff Thornton of Solano County .... 

Larkspur Auxiliary Police 

Police Ball Big Success 

Nine-Hour Day For Night Men of S.F.P.D. . 
Warning — Watch For Counterfeit Govern- 
ment Checks 

FBI Reports Crime Trends 

Editorial Page 



10 

11 

13 

14 

15 

16 
16 

18 

19 

20 

22 
26 
30 
32 
39 
40 
43 
44 
47 
52 
54 
55 
57 
58 
60 

62 
68 

72 



Directory 



i'he Editor is always pleased to consider articles suitable for publication. 
Contributions should preferably be typewritten, but where this is not pos- 
sible, copy should be clearly written. Contributions may be signed with a 
"nom de plume," but all articles must bear the name and address of the 
sender, which will be treated with the strictest confidence. The Editor 
will also be pleased to consider photographs of officers and of interesting 
events. Letters should be addressed to the Editor 



SAN FRANCISCO POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Hall of Justice, Kearny and Washington Streets 
Telephones SUtter 2020 - 2030 
Radio Short 'Wave Call KGPD 



Mayor, Hon. Roger D. Lapham 



BOARD OF POLICE COMMISSIONERS 

Regular Meetings, Monday, 8:00 p. m Hall of Justice 

Hon. Jerd Sullivan, President Crocker First Nat'l Bank 

Hon. John Wesley Howell 240 Battery Street 

Hon. E. L. Turkington Furniture Mart Bldg. 

Captain Charles F. Skelly, Secretary 
Room 104, Hall of Justice 



CHIEF OF POLICE Charles W. Duli.ka 

DEPUTY CHIEF OF POLICE Michael Riordan 

Dept. Sec'y Capt. John A. Engler Hall of Justice 

District Captains 

Central A. L. Christiansen 635 Washington St. 

Southern A. E. McDaniell Fourth and Clara Sts. 

Mission Leo J. Tackney 3057 17th St. 

Northern A. I. O'Brien 743 Ellis St. 

0. G. Park John A. Reed Stanyan opp. Waller 

Richmond F. J. McGuire 451 Sixth Ave. 

Ingleside....John M. Sullivan. ...Balboa Pk,, nr. San Jose Ave. 

Taraval Michael E. I. Mitchell 2348 24th Ave. 

PoTRERO Jos. M. Walsh 2300 Third St. 

Headquarters Patrick J. Murray Hall of Justice 

Traffic Bureau Chas. F. Skelly 635 Washington St, 

Bur. Inspectors B. J. McDonald Hall of Justice 

Supervising Captain of Districts. .M. GAFFEY..Hall of Justice 

Director 

Bureau of Personnel.. ..Lt. James L. English. ...Hall of Justice 

Director - Bureau of 

Special Services... .Insp. Percy H. KENEALLY....Hall of Justice 

Director of 

Juvenile bureau. .Lieut. Geo. M. Healy..2745 Greenwich St. 

Director - Bureau of Criminal 

Information Lieut. George Hippely Hall of Justice 

Property Clerk Capt. John J. Wade Hall of Justice 

Insp. of Schools Traffic Control....Insp. Byron Getchell 
Big Brother Bureau Lieut. Harry Reilly 



WhenlnTrouhle Qall SUtteV 20-20 

When in Doubt Always At Your service 



Page 2 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April. 1945 



Phone TEmplebar 1916 

JOHKSON 

MACHINE 
WORKS 

Manufacturing 

Jobbing 

• 

K. W. JOHNSON, Owner 
* 

901 E. Fourteenth Street 
Oakland, Calif. 



Phone OLympic 7710 



BELFAST 

BEVERAGE 

CO. 



3521 CHESTNUT STREET 
OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone Mill Valley 111— Day or Nite 

Art Boates 

MOTOR SALES 

AND 

CHRYSLER.PLYMOUTH 
MOTOR CARS 



EFFICIENT EMERGENCY 
ROAD SERVICE 



La GOMA and MILLER AVENUES 
MILL VALLEY, CALIF. 



SAUSALITO 

SHIPBUILDING 

COMPANY 



SAUSALITO, CALIF. 



! San Francisco 



"Efficient Police 

Make a City of 

Peace" 

(Established 1922 i 




A Police News 

and Educational 

Magazine 

iTrade Maik Copyright i 



Vol. XXI 



APRIL, 1945 



No. 12 



Policing the Security Meet 



Bv Opie L. Warner 



One of the biggest events that has ever taken place in 
San Francisco, and probably in the United States, is 
scheduled to begin on April 25, when the International 
Security Conference will convene. 

This meeting well may be one that will determine the 
future of civilisation, and may set the foundation to a last- 
ing peace among the nations of this world. Of this and 
many other objectives of the Golden Gate Conference, 
much has been written and much more will be written. 
This article will deal with the part the San Francisco 
Police Department will play in this great convention. 

There will be accredited delegates from over 40 na- 
tions. These delegates will be accompanied by secretaries, 
interpreters, advisors and a retinue of other men and wo- 
men familiar with international problems. The represent- 
ative of more nations congregating here will far outnum- 
ber any previous meeting an^^where on this earth. 

There will be hundreds of representatives of the press 
of the world, of outstanding magazines, and all radio net- 
works, all experts, to give a description of the proceedings 
which may extend into months. 

Now, with this great congregation of men and women 
imbued with a determination of setting up plans whereby 
the people of this world may live in peace and security, 
and with men well-schooled to report what transpires 
in the many meetings to come, a great majority of whom 
come from foreign countries, it is absolutely necessary 
that they be given the greatest protection from predatory 
criminals of all classes. In their place and temporary 
abode, on the streets and in their headquarters as well 
as in the main meeting places, they must be given the 
absolute maximum of police protection. And that is just 
what they are going to get. 

Director Walker of the U. S. Secret Service has a 
detail of Agents from many points in the United States. 
Chief William Merrill in charge of the Pacific Coast States 
of California, Nevada, Arizona, and Hav.'aii, has his pro- 
gram worked out and joins with local and national en- 
forcement officers to do his part in keeping safe each and 
every delegate and his accompanying assistants. 

Chief Special Agent Nat Picper, in charge of the local 



district of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, has had 
an augmented force of men assigned to him by Director 
John Edgar Hoover, who will be present at the meeting. 

Neighboring counties and cities have offered Chief 
Dullea their services in any way that will help in policing 
San Francisco for the period of the conference. Many 
of these offers have been accepted. 

From many big cities throughout the nation ace detec- 
tives have been assigned to work with Chief Dullea to 
keep the city crime-free. From New York, Chicago, Los 
Angeles, New Orleans, St. Louis, and many other points 
selected men, who have the ability to recognize any crook 
they have dealth with if he should show up here, have been 
assigned to work with the local officers. 

Chief E. Raymond Cato of the California Highway 
Patrol, has delegated a big detail of his experienced of- 
ficers to San Francisco during the convention. The Army, 
the Navy, and the Marines will have their expert intel- 
ligence men on the ground at all times. 

Chief Dullea has set up headquarters in the civic cen- 
ter for a special company to be headed by Capt. Michell 
Mitchell, who will have charge of policing the meeting 
places, which will be in the Municipal Opera House and 
Veterans Memorial buildings, and the Civic Auditorium. 

With this great array of law enforcement officers, it 
is a safe bet that no smart crook is going to try and crash 
this city after April 2 5 and for some weeks thereafter. 

As Chief Dullea stated at the Shrine Luncheon re- 
cently, the Police of San Francisco and the people of this 
city have a grave responsibility on this occasion, for he 
stated that we would never live it down if anything hap- 
pened to a single representative who came here for the 
conference. 

His orders to the Police Department will be found on 
another page, and for weeks the members have been 
carrying out his orders to clean up the town of crooks as 
well as insanitary places of business and abode. 

With precedents well established by previous great 
gatherings held in San Francisco, which show pickpockets, 
bunco men, burglars, holdups, and kindred criminals 
have been well controlled, we have no apprehension 



Page 4 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 194? 



about the ability of the San Francisco Police Department 
to take this conference in stride and add another bright 
page to its illustrous history. 

On March 21 Chief Charles W. Dullea issued general 
orders to the Police Department respecting the work the 
members arc expected to do prior to the opening of the 
World Security Conference, which started in this city on 
April 25. 

Following are the orders: 

On April 25, 1945, the WORLD SECURITY CON- 
FERENCE will be held in San Francisco, Calif. 

From a police viewpoint, there is a deep significance in 
this announcement — a responsibility is placed upon the 
department that calls for a record of efficiency that will 
parallel your efforts in policing former important events. 

This Conference is international in scope and it is an- 
ticipated that many situations will arise which will call 
for tactful and diplomatic procedure on the part of the 
officer. 

Delegates will attend this Conference from nearly all 
nations of the world and in many instances it will be 
found that they will not be familiar with the customs and 
language of this country. These advantages may result in 
some misunderstandings. Officers should be alert to situa- 
tions of this kind and shall extend the greatest degree of 
courtesy in directing and advising the delegates who may 
find themselves in such a predicament. 

Pending the receipt of official information from the 
State Department, relative to the schedules which are to 
be followed during the holding of the Conference, the 
police department must make certain preliminary prepa- 
rations. 

Company Commanders shall issue orders to their re- 
spective members that a constant vigilance shall be main- 
tained by them in arresting all criminals who may attempt 
to establish themselves in this city prior to the holding of 
the Conference. 

The suppression of criminal elements by members of 
your commands must be a continuous effort enforced 
through the medium of constant arrest and supervision. 

Captain Bernard J. McDonald, Commanding Bureau of 
Inspectors, shall issue orders to members of his command, 
instructing them to rid this city of all known criminals 
who may in any manner attempt to prey upon the visiting 
delegates. 

He shall also maintain details at all transportation de- 
pots for the purpose of keeping under surveillance, any 
known criminals who may attempt to enter this city. 

The members of this department have shown time and 
time again, that they are able to cope with any condition 
that may arise or present itself, and I desire that each 
member of this department consider himself as one who 
must exert all his police power to the fullest extent, so 
tha<- this city can and will remain clean of any criminal 
element. 

Company Commanders shall issue orders to their res- 
pective members that surveys shall be made on their re- 
spective beats and reports submitted of all places and 



premises that should be cleaned in compliance with the 
provisions of the health laws of this city. 

They shall also instruct their respective members that 
an inspection of personnel uniforms and equipment will 
be held prior to April 25th. 1945. 

It is expected that we will be called upon during the 
sessions of the Conference, to work long and arduous 
hours. I respectfully request the men to bear with the 
situation, always keeping in mind that the eyes of the 
world are upon this city and the protection tendered to 
the delegates by its law enforcement officers. 

CHARLES W. DULLEA. 

Chief of Police. 



Chief Donald Wood of San Anselmo 

Chief of Police Donald Wood of San Anselmo, has 
completed 15 years as top man in the city's Police De- 
partment. 

He has seen his adopted city continually grow until 
It now houses some 8000 people. He has given San An- 




Chief Donald Wood 

selmo as fine police protection as any city in this state. 
With his regular force of six men and a force of 18 
well trained auxiliary police he has kept all sorts of crimes 
from happening in his territory. 

Probably one of the most outstanding and effective 
things that has marked his 15 years as Chief is his in- 
stallation of 2-way radio in 1934. There was then only 
one 2-way police radio in the state, that being in Pied- 
mont, the first in the United States to adopt this method 
of communication. 

He can look back to his decade and a half of service 
with the realization that he has given his city, and aided 
in giving the surrounding towns and cities of Marin 
County, the best police protection it is possible to give. 



Apnl. 1945 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 5 



Sergeant Albrecht Shot by Holdup Man 



On Saturday night, March 17, a Negro held up a 
South of Market street tavern. He got a few hundred 
dollars and made a getaway. The victim of the robbery 
notified the police and there was started a series of events 
that ended in the arrest of the Negro, identified as Louis 
Lee Jackson, a 53-year-old ex-convict, out of San Quentin 
on parole for a crime committed in Riverside County. 
Jackson was arrested after he had critically shot Ser- 




Serge.^nt WiLLi.Mvi Albrecht 

geant William Albrecht of the Southern Station, who led 
a posse that took up the chase of the Tavern holdup, and 
cornered him under the Bay Bridge ramp off Harrison 
Street. Albrecht "went in" to get the Negro who could 
not be seen and who fired a shot at the ofiicer as he ap- 
proached, then made a getaway. The shot hit the sergeant 
behind the ear and came out beside his nose, missing his 
brain. 

Then there was unlosed one of the characteristic police 
well-planned campaigns to get the robber and would-be 
slayer. 

With all the men of Captain Alexander McDaniell, 
commander of the Southern Police Station and men from 
the Robbery and Homicide Detail of the Inspection Bu- 
reau thrown into the chase the police had the man who 
comitted the robber>' and did the shooting of the police 
officer in custody in 24 hours after the holdup. 

Then came the breaks that often result from exception- 
ally executed police work, breaks that cleared up the 
brutal murder of Navy Bus Driver Miss Winifred Cecil 
who was wantonly and brutally slain in her bus three 
months ago, shortly after it left its starting station; Jack- 
son was identified and admitted to the rape of a "teen-age 
girl who was cruelly treated and of the beating of her 
younger brother who had valiantly come to the aid of his 
attacked sister, also the rape of at least three other women 
and numerous robberies. 



Inspectors Frank Ahern of the Homicide Detail, and 
Frank McCann of the Robbery Detail, Lloyd Kelley and 
Rudy Kopfer Officers Dave Dillon and Jules Zimmerlin of 
Southern Station, took a leading part in the apprehension 
of Jackson, whose arrest was dramatically made in a moive 
theater on Third Street. 

Jackson, evidently conscience-stricken for shooting Ser- 
geant Albrecht, placed himself in a position that brought 
about his arrest Sunday afternoon of March 18. He called 
at the Southern Station and inquired about the condition 
of the man he had shot and told the officers he knew who 
did the shooting. He was taken in tow and after failing 
to locate the parties he said were responsible, was trailed 
until the afternoon of Sunday when he again tipped his 
hand and phoned the Police Department that the man 
who had done the shooting was in the moving picture 
theater. A squad of officers headed by Inspectors Ahern 
and McCann, showed up, and after a brief questioning 
of Jackson made up their minds that they would waste 
no more time with him in his rambles. They took him in 
custody and landed him in the Hall of Justice where, 
with the assistance of District Attorney Edmund Brown, 
Jackson was subjected to many hours of "questions and 
answers." Early in the morning of Monday, March 19, 
he broke and not only confessed to the robbery of the 
tavern and the shooting of Sergeant Albrecht, but when 
accused of the murder of Miss Cecil readily admitted that 
crime. Then he recited a list of other rapes and robberies. 

The officials did not take Jackson's word for all these 
crimes but proceeded to bring in victims who identified 
him. In his room they found the identification tag of the 
boy friend of Miss Cecil, which was in her purse when 
she was murdered, and which Jackson had taken. In 
possession of a friend, to whom he had given it, was the 
gun used in his many crimical acts. Criminologist Francis 
X. Latulipe identified this gun as the one from which the 
bullet was fired that killed Miss Cecil. 

Jackson was charged with murder and was held to 
answer by Municipal Judge Harry Neubarth for this 
crime, and he is on his way to a trial in the superior 
court that should forever remove him from further dep- 
redations. 

Sergeant Albrecht, who has been a member of the San 
Francisco Police Department since July 2, 1934, is recov- 
ering from his injur>'. He lived up to the traditions of 
our police department in a manner that has been so well, 
and often tragically, exemplified by members of the De- 
partment, who were ready to make the supreme sacrifice 
in carrying out their sworn duies — of protecting life and 
property. 

The brave Sergeant did not tell his men to go in and 
get the suspect, he went in himself, knowing from his long 
experience as a police officer that he might run up against 
a bullet or other lethal weapon. He gave a demonstration 
of courage without a thought of his personal safety that 
f Continued on page 82 I 



Page 6 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 1945 



One Little Town Did Something About It 



By Frederick Loomis, M. D. 



A few days ago I saw a husky six-footer jab a revolver 
into the midriff of a much smaller man, unarmed and 
twice his age, with the snarling command to "stick "em 
up". His victim hesitated and he pulled the trigger. As 
if by magic the barrel of the gun was deflected and in two 
seconds, so fast that I could not see what happened, the 




Chief Wm. V. Pflalm 

big man was flat on the ground and the little man stood 
over him, the gun in his own hand. A moment later an- 
other big man seized the smaller one by both wrists. Ap- 
parently without effort and just as quickly, his hold was 
broken and he sprawled beside the first one. 

Professionals? Not at all. The attackers were staid 
young business men, former athletes. The smaller man, 
his hair thin and touched with gray, was, ,of all things, 
the proprietor of a local lingerie and dress goods shop. 
The attackers did not resist. They know better. They 
too had been trained and knew that resistance meant a 
broken arm or broken neck, or both. This was only an ex- 
hibition of self defense. 

The little man is a counterpart of the little city in 
which he lives. Both are shining examples of the fact that 
one does not have to be big to do very unusual things. 
These men and 69 others are members of the Auxiliary 
Police Force of Piedmont, Calif. I wanted to know how 
and why they came into being. I found that unlike the 
Air Wardens and other civilian volunteers since Pearl 
Harbor, this group dates back nearly ten years, an out- 
growth of an incident as dramatic as any in the old days 
of the early West. 

In 19.^4, San Francisco suffered the great waterfront 
strike. Scores of ships were tied up at the docks or were 
lying idle in the harbor at an expense of tens of thou- 
sands of dollars a day, their cargoes rotting. The docks 



were patrolled by determined pickets armed with clubs 
and guns. Weeks went by. Disorder increased, autos and 
food trucks were overturned, the water-front was in a 
state of insurrection. 

And then, as if that were not enough, a general strike 
was called, not only for San Francisco, but for the whole 
Bay area, including Oakland, Berkeley. Piedmont, and 
other neighboring cities. This meant that not only the 
longshoremen but the truck drivers and teamsters were 
forbidden to lift a crate or turn a wheel; and this in turn 
meant shutting off the delivery of food and supplies for 
our homes and hospitals, and of gasoline for our cars 
even in Piedmont which has no water-front. The doc- 
tors were given big paper placards saying "physician" 
to paste on their windshields and were instructed to go 
to the headquarters of the strikers for authorization to buy 
gasoline at certain specified stations. 

With other doctors, I put the placard on my car and 
then almost before the paste was dry indignantly tore it 
off again. Instead I put on the deputy sheriff's badge I 
was authorized to wear and put a gun in the car beside 
me, which was not a very intelligent thing to do, per- 
haps. 

Piedmont is a little city entirely surrounded by Oak- 
land. It covers less than two square miles and at that 
time It had less than 10.000 residents. In a way it is a 
bedroom town for Oakland and San Francisco. The 
business district then comprised one drug store, one groc- 
ery, one candy store, one barber shop and two gas sta- 
tions. No others were allowed. It is called a rich man's 
town, which is only partly true. There are no slums but 
many people of only moderate means live there as well 
as those of great wealth. Immediately several of these, the 
so-called shipping magnates, received notices that there 
homes were about to be dynamited, even in at least two 
instances setting the hour. 

The police and civic officials met that night, deter- 
mined that no one was doing to dynamite anything in 
their town. Their plan was not without danger. Word 
was passed around that there would be a mass meeting 
at the High School the next day. At that meeting, 200 
volunteered to serve as special officers and by night nearly 
600 had flocked to headquarters — bankers, lawyers, busi- 
ness executives, clerks, gardeners, college students — a 
strange collection of the old and young, many of them 
World War veterans. They carried weapons of every 
vintage from Lugers to duck guns. The city ordered a 
thousand pick handles which were issued to those who 
for the moment could not be supplied with anything else. 
Almost within the hour a food station was established by 
the eager women of Piedmont who had hot coffee, sand- 
wiches and doughnuts ready. Twenty cots were put in 
for those who needed rest. 

('Continued on page 65 ) 



April. 1945 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 

Chief Theuer of Burlingame 



Page 7 



On March 5 the city council of BurHngame appointed 
Captain Rudolph C. (Jack) Theuer as Chief of Police 
to iill the vacancy occasioned by the retirement on pension 
of veteran Chief John J. Harper. 

Chief Theuer has been a member of the Burlingame 
Police Department since March 1, 1919, and has seen 
the Department grow from three members to its present 
strength of 18 men. When he joined the force Chief L. 




Chief Jack Theuer 

A. Chartier was its head, serving until 192. V The other 
member of the force at that time was Officer Edward 
Oliphant who retired November 1, 1942. Later Charles 
Jenkins, pensioned in 1942, and Joseph J. Langwell who 
died Sept. 30, 1943, were added to the list of patrolmen. 
For years before his death Langwell was a partner of the 
new Chief. 

Born in San Francisco, August 24, 1893, Chief Theuer 
worked as a structural iron worker and for several years 
before he joined the Police Department of Burlingame 
was a conductor for the old Market Street Car line, and 
his run was from San Francisco to San Mateo. It was 
while engaged in this occupation that he decided Burlin- 
game was the place where he should take up his future 
home. He moved from his native city to Burlingame, 
which then had a population of some 4500, against its 
present population of over 22,000. 

Shortly after joining the Police Department he met 
a Burlingame girl. Miss Knippenberg, whom he married 
24 years ago. They have a son, Marion, 22, who is an 
ensign in the U. S. Navy. 

Once deciding police work was the job for him. Officer 
Theuer applied himself to every task assigned to his at- 
tention and by hard studying he advanced up the ranks 
of the department. He was appointed a sergeant in 1924 
and in 1927 passed a promotional examination for the 
position and in 1939 was appointed a captain. For 12 
years he had charge of the office and in this job he added 
further to his experience on police administration. He 
has had much to do with the organization of the Depart- 
ment, and contributed in many ways to making it as fine 



an agency for protection of life and property and the ap- 
prehension of law breakers as any similar community can 
show. 

He has had many experiences and often in the face of 
great personal danger has ended the career of a dan- 
gerous criminal. One instance in particular was that 
of Benny Hassen, who had been giving the Peninsula po- 
lice officers a merry time with a series of robberies and 
burglaries. Theuer cornered him one night in a lodging 
house and took a shot at the crook, who managed to get 
away. A couple of nights later he got word that his man 
was hiding in a home on Eastern Drive and Vancouver 
Street. With Chief Harper he dashed to the scene. Has- 
sen heard the two officers coming and got out of the house 
in which he was hiding and made for the bushes. He took 
a shot at Harper and Theuer but missed, the two officers 
returning the fire and when they closed in they found 
their man dead, with a bullet through his body. 

Chief Theuer is a charter member of the Peninsula 
Police Officers Association, serving in its first years for 
two terms as President. After holding the high office he 
was elected treasurer, which position he has occupied ever 
since. 

To him, and Captain Jim J. Hartnett belongs the major 
credit for the success of the Association which in its his- 
tory has grown from an original membership of 38 to 105i 
and has paid out some $25,000 in death benefits to the 
families of deceased police officers of the Peninsula. 

The membership of Burlingame Police Department be- 
fore the war was 19, including the Chief. It now has 17 
and the 18th, Alfred Marion, will return to duty after 
many months in our armed services. 

Three other members of the Department are in the arm- 
ed services, they being Alfred Nultemier, William Fit- 
patrick and James Kennedy. A fifth member, Joseph W. 
Loftus, who joined the force in 1940, and entered the U. 
S. Army in November, 1942, was killed in action April 
2, 1944, in Italy. 

The membership exclusive of the above in the Depart- 
ment, is made up of the following: 

Captain John J. Hartnett, Sergeants Lawrence Furio, 
and John G. Price, Officers Earl Christensen, Edward 
Hallett, Charles H. Thomas, Richard Crunig, Raymond 
Nelson, Alfred Caviglia, Dorven Kreeger, Robert Hinter- 
man, Fred Mowrey, Edward Burrows and D. Lowe. 

Chief Theuer announces that he contemplates no great 
changes in the conduct of the Police Department, adopt- 
ing many of the policies of his predecessor which has 
made a good Police Department for Burlingame. He 
states that his main aim is to continue giving the people of 
his adopted city as fine police protection as it is humanly 
possible to give, and he will ever go out in front to see 
that the men serving under him get the breaks to which 
they are entitled. 

He is now providing a well-equipped quarters for pho- 
I Continued on page 84) 



Page 8 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 1945 



Finger Records in Bible History 



By B. C. Bridges 

Superintendent Bureau of Identification 

Alameda Police Department 



The author of the accompanying article, which was 
written for the San Francisco Police Journal, is an inter- 
nationally recognized expert in identification. He is the 
author of the book, "Practical Fingerprinting," one of the 
most complete authoritative and up-to-date works on fin- 
gerprinting, published by Funk and Wagnalls Co., New 
York. 



(Ali rights reserved b_v the author) 

In olden days, on the east hank of the River Tigris, 
rose Nineveh, now famed in Bible story. It was a settle- 
ment of importance as long ago as 3000 B. C, later be- 
coming the wonder of the ancient Orient, and the scourge 




SuPT. B. C. Bridges 

of its peaceful plains. With variable fortunes, it endured 
as a metropolis of inimitable splendor until almost the 
Christian era, but subsequent years saw its final eclipse, 
and through slowly passing centuries, its forgotten beau- 
ties lay buried in their earth-capped tomb of oblivion. 

With current enterprise, questing spades have disturbed 
that burial site, and long-hidden wonders are once again 
revealed to eyes of men. Through the skillful reconstruc- 
tions of such archaeologists as Layard, Smith, Rawlinson, 
and others, a new civilization now may know something 
of a lost Nineveh, and of her rival, the wonder-city, 
Babylon. 

Tier above tier, the cities that were Nineveh arose, 
each erected upon the site of previous building, as king 
after king flourished to sweep away that which had been, 
and make space for the creation of his dreams. With 
ruthless warfare as their chief concern and occupation. 



these people found inspiration in the patronage of their 
cruel and insatiable deities, Ashur of Nineveh, and Ishtar 
of Babylon, whose ornate temples were the repositories 
of treasures pillaged from all surrounding Asia Minor, 
whose ravaged tribes fought, died, and were enslaved 
in continual and sanguinary conflict. 

Cyprus, Palestine, Kurdistan, Egypt, all poured their 
tribute into the melting pot to bedeck with gold, electrum, 
gems, and costly fabrics, the Nineveh and Babylon that 
were; but time, the eternal destroyer, cast down the palace 
of Nebuchadnezzar and the Hanging Gardens built for his 
queen, homesick for her hills of Media. Scattered by the in- 
different elements were those walls upon which a fearful 
Belshazzar once beheld the portent writing. Razed were 
the great Astronomical Ziggurat of Nineveh and the far- 
famed glories of its temples, while the vaunting Tower 
of Babel became but the wind-blown sands of a desert. 

Empty waste-lands stretch where once those wonders 
reared. Could the tacit earth mounds, through some magic 
imagery, recapture a mirage of the lost glories which they 
once beheld, then might be seen upon those now-vacant 
plains, thickly-traveled highroads aswirl with dust eddies 
from the feet of donkeys, camels, elephants, horses, and 
from chariots and the winding caravans of traders. 

In this conjured panorama, sloping hillsides form a 
background for fair suburbs where dwell the wealthy 
citizenry in gaily-colored villas. Nearer, the great city 
walls bulk in massive thickness of yellow brick, thrust- 
ing high their sentry-towers and fortifications, patrolled 
by sturdy soldiery in bronze armor, with spear-heads and 
trappings gleaming in the sun. 

Within these confines rise the lofty palaces and temples, 
statues empedestalled, triumphal arches, public buildings, 
and many-storied apartment dwellings where reside poli- 
tical favorites and financial magnates. Radiant with gild- 
ing, they loom against a blue and vivid tropic sky. Gaudy 
banners and pennons stir listlessly in the hot and languid 
breeze. Shafts of sunrays smite the embossed bronze 
plaques and metal plating of gateway pylon and door, 
and glance from the sleek flanks of sculptured winged bulls 
and lions which everywhere proclaim Assyrian omnipo- 
tence. 

These walls of bright enchantment once regularly echoed 
to the fanfare of victorious trumpets, as armored warriors 
marched homeward from their quests of strife and con- 
quest, treading their foot-thunder on the pavements to the 
clamor of the street rabble and the cheering of silk-clad 
aristocrats who filled the ornate painted balconies. 

At the broad temple stairs, the music of flutes, harps, 
cymbals and silvery systra welcomed the returning heroes, 
while priests sang orisons above the mourning-songs of 
captured prisoners. 



April. 1945 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 9 



For milleniums, the celebration of Hittite battle cam- 
paigns called forth ritual and festival with continued 
regularity. The military portals were ever swung apart 
for passing troops to leave for coming war, or to return 
from hostilities temporarily ended. Meanwhile, the civic 
gates were choked with traffic; great commercial thorough- 
fares were flanked by bazaars, crowded with colorful stalls 
displaying ornaments, clothing, fruit; all things to amuse, 
to wear, to eat. Slaves polished pottery or shook the 
lengths of rustling fabrics on display, and called out the 
wares of their masters, the Saracen, Phoenician, Syrian, 
and Jewish traders, who brought their merchandise from 
far Cathy, India, Egypt, Libia, and from prolific Ophir; 
horses, apes and peacocks, ivory, gold, gems, furs, wine, 
beer, and priceless glass — everything that the known and 
tributary world could devise and barter. 

Arcades of pillars, spread with striped awnings, shaded 
the slave-carried litters of women, who bought and dick- 
ered with the merchants until their ringed coins were 
spent, or their credit exhausted. 

Yonder were the great temples, with square walls sur- 
mounted by terraces of painted and gilded columns, their 
staircases streaming with devotees carrying offerings, or 
departing, lightened of both their burdens and their sins. 
Affluent and perfumed citizens crowded the streets and 
threw largess to whining beggars, coldly ignoring the 
common clerks and messengers, who hurried between 
counting-houses, courts of justice, and thriving marts of 
trade 

All written business of that day and age was upon 
tablets of clay, which were carefully set aside to he baked 
in kilns or furnaces, thus hardening the material and 
preserving the text. The inscriptions usually were in cunei- 
form; wedge-shaped characters that first began as picture 
writing, and later evolved into word-symbol ideographs. 

These tablets were delivered, after they had been baked, 
to the proper customer, or perhaps were filed in the library 
of records that housed, in shelves and pigeon-holes, classi- 
fied assortments of wide diversity; treaties with foreign 
countries, or armistices, alliances, confederations of war; 
historical narratives, royal decrees and speeches from the 
throne; summaries of military campaigns, and diplomatic 
correspondence with neighboring potentates. Here also 
was a mass of human documents, wills, testaments, in- 
ventories, records of property, military regulations, and 
business transactions. 

Modern excavators have unearthed in the ruins of 
Nineveh just such a library. It contained over twenty 
thousand tablets, dealing with a wide variety of subjects, 
and written in the familiar cuneiform. Here was an un- 
usual discovery, and one of prime importance, since many 
of the records were plainly marked and signed with 
fingerprints. 

The fierce and idolatrous Assyrian had fostered and 
recorded in his baked-clay transcripts the same mystic 
significance of hands and fingers as did the brutish cave 
man with his stone maul and flaked-flint chisel. Important- 
ly and with endurance, the impulse has survived, assum- 
ing many aspects and expressions, but ever stressing the 



denotation of a human hand. 

Some tablets bore the signature-imprint of the writer's 
personal seal, the long-established method of registering 
identity. In the absence of this convenience, the tablets 
often bore impression of the signer's thumb-print, the 
substitution being explained: "Supur Kima Abnu-\unu\' 
\isu ..." ("the author's fingerprint as used in the place 
of his personal seal"). And all stations were represented, 
from ruler and merchant-prince to the humblest trades- 
man; their hands had pressed receptive clay in personal 
touch and proof of authenticity. 

Many tablets there were which bore the attestation 
of a notary, and concluded with one or another of such 
inscriptions as "One shekel of silver for his supur," or 
"Three minje bronze for his supur," or perhaps "Ten 
minx bronze for their supurs," when several signatures 
appeared. The word "supur" stood for signature, and also 
was synonymous with "fingerprint"; a "mina" was an 
arbitrary value or sum of money, varying with time and 
place, but usually representing about a pound troy-weight. 
Such charges never would have been levied for trivial rea- 
sons, as is well confirmed by the texts of a number of the 
writings, which clearly explain their legal verification and 
protection. 

Among the mementoes of ancient Egypt, there have 
been discovered similar tablets, bearing multi-fingerprint 
signatures, that were found to be receipts for rentals and 
for taxes; and here probability would surmise that the 
impressions were those of the land-owner or tenant, and 
of the recording clerk, who received and receipted for 
the payment. 

It should be noted that the large and varied assortment 
of tablets found at Nineveh was collected under supervi- 
sion of one of the Assyrian kings, Assur-bani-pal, in the 
precincts of whose palace the objects were discovered. 
Known as "The Royal Library," this array of documents 
originally came from many sources. 

Copied after those of the Babylonian potentates, the 
Assyrian royal residence frequently received more atten- 
tion than did the temple buildings, although the latter 
were by no means neglected. Usually one-storied, the 
king's habitation often covered an area of twenty or more 
acres, and was beautifully and elaborately built with 
stucco, rare woods, and alabaster, upon which favorable 
material w«re carven endless inscriptions and sculptures 
illustrating the many wars and personal achievements of 
the ruling monarch. 

Within such a structure was the Royal Library assem- 
bled by Assur-bani-pal. In striking contrast with his cus- 
tomarily cruel and warlike spirit, this soreveign, who is 
thought to have lived from 668 to 625 B. C, also was an 
enthusiastic patron of art and literature. At his direction 
was brought together the Royal Library, an archive open 
to the public, as indicated in an inscription written per- 
sonally by the king, which states: "I (Assur-bani-pal) 
wrote upon the tablets; I placed them in my palace for the 
instruction of my people". 

The greater part of the tablets were copies of older 
(Continued on page 84 j 



Page 10 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL April, 1945 

Post -War Police Problems 

By Chief of Police Charles W. Dullea 
(Presented at the Annual War Conference of the International Association of Chiefs of Police at Cleveland in August j 



IX. Public Education 
In the last few years Police Chiefs and law enforcement 
officials have been invited to participate in discussions 
pertaining to community problems and it is now generally 
recognized that a progressive Police Administrator is as 
keenly aware of the problems of the day as any other 




Chief Charles-W. Dullea 

official and that frequetly he is able to propose a solution 
to the problem. 

Heads of law enforcement groups should actively asso- 
ciate themselves with groups such as the Bar Association, 
Chambers of Commerce, Community Chest Programs, Red 
Cross Drives, Service Clubs and kindred organizations so 
that when a sound police program is to be instituted they 
will be able to enlist their support of the program. 

It has been pointed out that every group of professions 
and trades have a Board or Commission representing their 
particular calling at the State Capitols. We have the 
State Board of Architects, State Board of Examiners, State 
Board of Education, State Board of Barbers, and so on, 
but nowhere do we have a State Board watching out for 
the interests of the Police. It has been proposed by the 
Attorney General of the State of California that thought 
be given to the establishment of such a Board in every 
State in the Union and that while such a Board would 
exercise no power over individual departments, never- 
the-less they would keep a watchful eye on the legisla- 
ture and see that no laws which were inimical to the wel- 
fare of the people or to the sound administration of justice 
were enacted. Such a Board would be in a position to 



recommend legislation for the betterment and uniformity 
of pension and salary conditions and perform any num- 
ber of services which would make the people conscious 
of the dignity of a police officer. 

The Police should actively sponsor community pro- 
grams and thus cultivate the confidence of their fellow 
citizens. This is good public relations and it will be sorely 
needed in the post-war era when the struggle for finances 
will be a real problem. The thought must be put over that 
a good policing job is an actual saving to the community 
and that it is money well spent when used for increased 
personnel and equipment for the protection of the citizen. 

It might be well at this time to give some thought to the 
character of organizations that will spring up and are 
already springing up throughout the land. Subversive 
groups, masquerading under misleading names but which 
are really transmission belts for organizations seeking to 
overthrow our government are coming to life. These or- 
ganizations have been denounced by the Attorney General 
of the United States and they have been driven under- 
ground or have changed their names. They thrive on un- 
rest and strife and will seek to create issues where no 
cause exists. Police Chiefs must never relax their vigilance 
and active opposition to these groups. The returning sol- 
diers and sailors should be urged to join patriotic organi- 
zations such as the American Legion, Veterans of Foreign 
Wars and similar organizations and to participate actively 
in their programs of Americanism. 

X. Prostitution and Vice 

One of the most important gains made by Police De- 
partments during the wartime period was the stamping 
out of commercialized prostitution. It is true that we had 
the support of the Army, Navy and Health Authorities 
in the campaign and as a result of their active co-opera- 
tion, houses of prostitution and the Red Light Districts 
were closed. 

Huge sums of money were appropriated by the Fed- 
eral Government in its campaign to repress prostitution 
and every field of law enforcement was drafted to assist 
in the program. A campaign of education in venereal 
disease control was carried into labor, fraternal and edu- 
cational circles to such an extent that the whole country 
was aroused to the dangers attached to unrestricted com- 
mercialized vice. The Federal Security Agency was active 
in every part of the country and assisted local Boards of 
Health in establishing medical control centers. In short, 
an appeal was made that it was a patriotic campaign and 
if a community did not co-operate wholeheartedly, the 
enforcement of the provisions of the May Act was threat- 
ened, which if carried out, would place the community 
out of bounds for service men and such action would na- 
turally reflect discredit on the particular locality. But 
(Continued on page 49) 



ApnJ, 1945 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 

Meritorious Conduct Awards 



Page 11 



1. Applications for commendation under the Rules 
and Regulations of the San Francisco Police Department 
ha\e been heard by the Aleritorius Conduct Board, and 
the following citations were presented at the Policemen's 
Ball, Saturday, April 7, to the members named. 

2. The following named will receive citations from 
the Chief of Police because of important arrests made by 
them which involved elements of initiative, intelligence 
and bravery : 

Police Officer John G. Kwartz (Co. C) : Services per- 
formed on January 7, 1945, in rescuing a U. S. Sailor 
who was seriously endangered while swimming in the 
waters of the Pacific Ocean in the vicinity of Seal Rocks. 

Lieut. Daniel P. McKlem, Inspector Frank P. Mc- 
Cann, Inspector Raymond F. Doherty, Inspector Max 
B. Reznik, and Assistant Inspector Edward J. Murphy 
(Bureau of Inspectors): Services performed on Nov. 2 
and 3, 1944, in the apprehension of Leigh Haskell Fowl- 
er, who was armed at the time of his arrest, and who was 
charged with kidnapping and several robberies in this 
city. 

Police Officer James L. Egan, Police Officer Edw. J. 
Navin, Jr. (Co. E): Services performed on February 
25, 1945, when they arrested Edgar Seward, who was 
armed at the time of his arrest, and discovered hiding on 
the roof at 956 Ellis Street, where he had taken refuge 
after committing robbery and threatening to shoot a vic- 
tim. 

Police Officer Edw. F. McLaughlin, Police Officer 
Reno A. Piccinini, Alfred J. Nedler (Co. K) : Services 
performed on November 7, 1944, in the apprenhension of 
Mike Agapoff, an alleged insane man, armed with a large 
knife and who had entered the San Francisco Hospital 
with apparent homicidal intent. 

Police Officer Charles E. Human (Co. K) : Services 
performed on January- lb, 1945, in the pursuit and appre- 
hension of Clarence I aylor, who had robbed and threat- 
ened the life of a Yellow Cab Driver (female) a few min- 
utes earlier. 

Police Officer Paul J. O'Leary (Co. K) : Services per- 
formed on No\ ember 27, 1944, in disarming and arrest- 
ing Ollie T. Maxie who had pursued a U. S. Sailor and 
endeavored to assult him with a large knife. 

Sergeant Thos. I. Flanagan (Co. H): Services per- 
formed on December 13, 1944, in the search and appre- 
hension of two burglars in the vicinity of 950 Faxon 
Avenue, one of whom was an ex-convict and armed with 
an automatic pistol. 

Sergeant Richard L. Hanlon, Police Officer \Valter L. 
Sullivan, Police Officer Albert A. Halonen (Co. A): 
Services performed on December 30, 1944, in the arrest 
of Michael Nazarro and Earl Norton, armed at time of 
arrest and who were wanted in connection with several 
robberies. 

Sergeant Harold E. Anderson (Co. A) : Services per- 
formed on July 2, 1944, in the pursuit and capture of 



three holdupmen driving a stolen Bluebird Cab. The oc- 
cupants of the cab were also wanted in connection with 
robberies of other taxicabs. 

Police Officer George Sully, Jr. (Co. H): Services 
performed on September 7, 1944, in the apprehension of 
James De Mato, discovered in the act of burglaiizing 
the safe of a Shell Ser\ice Station at 4249 Mission Street. 

Police Officer Melvin L. Jorgensen (Co. K). and Po- 
lice Officer Stanley A. Kelly (Co. G) : Services perform- 
ed on January 10, 1945, in the apprenhension of Franklin 
Gay, armed, and driving a stolen automobile at time of 
arrest. He was booked for kidnapping and robbery. 



Captains' Commendations: 



3. Fhe Meritorious Conduct Board heard the follow- 
ing applications and determined that they involved close 
attention to police duty and were worthy of commenda- 
tion of the Commanding Officer under whom the men 
perform police duty: 

Sergeant Arthur L. Morrison, Police Officer Edw. F. 
McLaughlin, Police Officer \Vm. S. Hardeman, Police 
Officer Jack F. O'Neill (Co. K) : Services performed on 
July 5, 1944, in the investigation, and arrest of ^Valter 
S. Killip, Jr., on charges of hit-and-run, personal injury. 

Lieut. Daniel P. McKlem, Inspector Fred R. Butz, 
Inspector Harry F. Husted, Inspector Francis J. Ahern, 
Inspector Alvin C. Corrasa, Inspector Raymond J. O'- 
Brien, Assistant Inspector Edw. J. Murphy (Bureau of 
Inspectors), and Police Officer Gustave C. Wyman (Co. 
H) : Services performed on January 15, 1945, in the in- 
vestigation, arrest and conviction of Raymond ^Valker, 
Robert Chapman and Rayrrond Grey, on charges of At- 
tempted Robbery and Murder of David Potrovich, pro- 
prietor of a grocery store, on January 13, 1945. 

Police Officer Frank G. Gibeau, Sergeant Henry C. 
Atkinson, Jr. (Co. E) : Services performed on February 
2, 1945, in the apprehension of Woodrow Meadows on 
charges of Attempted Kidnapping, Assault and Auto 
Theft. 

Police Officer Kenneth G. Fahs, Police Officer Edw. 
B. Cummins (Co. K) : Services performed on January 
13, 1945, in the arrest of Alex Duccini, Truly Cum- 
mins and Allen Moore for violation of the Gun Law, 
when the latter were suspected of a fatal shooting at 290 
Farallone Street on the same date. 

Police Officer Frank P. Baroni, Police Officer Wm. 
P. Kavanaugh (Co. A) : Services performed on February 
20, 1945, in the pursuit and arrest of Odis Dodson on 
charges of First Degree Robbery. 

Inspector Lloyd F. Kelly, Assistant Inspector Rudy J. 
Kopfer (Bureau of Inspectors): Services performed on 
December 3, 1944, in the arrest of Eugene L. Justi want- 
ed for murder, committed a few hours before, in Rodeo, 
California. 

(Continued on page i5 ) 



Page 12 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April. J 945 





Phone Vallejo 3-9737 


Compliments of 




Mint Cafe 

Drop in, Look the Place Over 


SOLANO 

INN 


and 
MEET JIM 

* 


Where Good Fellows Get 
Together 

* 


GOOD FOOD 




* 


233 Georgia Street 


SUISUN, CALIFORNIA 


Vallejo, Calif. 


Le CHAiEAU 


PRODUCTS AWARDED 
18 GOLD MEDALS 


DINE and DANCE 
and COCKTAILS 


...for... 

PURITY and QUALITY 

* 


101 HIGHWAY 




2 1/2 Miles North of 
SAN RAFAEL, CALIF. 


Maid of California 
Milk Company 


* 


627 Maryland Street 


Home of THE LIARS' CLUB 


Vallejo, Calif. 




Prompt Delivery Service to All Ships 


CLIFF COX Thanks You 


at Mare Island 



April, 1945 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page n 



Vallejo Police Get Salary Raise 



Members of the Vallejo Police Department are mighty 
happy these days. They have done a swell job of pre- 
serving the peace of this great wartime town, and for 
this swell job they have been given a raise in salaries. 

The pay for patrolmen now starts at $190 a month. 
At the end of six months it is increased to $200, and 




Chief Earl Dierking 

every six months thereafter, $5.00 until the monthly pay 
is $230. 

Those of higher ranks get increases as well as the pa- 
trolmen. 

Chief Earl Dierking knows how his force of 38 men 
have worked during the war years, when from 25,000 
the population has jumped up to some 114,000, with 
added thousands working at Mare Island and living else- 
where. His men have had to patrol miles and miles of 
newly constructed defense homes, and look after the 
crowds that converge on the streets of the City of Val- 
lejo at nights and even during the day time. So he felt 
they were entitled to more pay. He had an ardent sup- 
porter in the effort to get the increases, in Police Com- 
missioner Andrew Shevelan, who did more than his share 
in getting more wages for the police. Commissioner Shev- 
elan was, beside being a supervisor in Solano county, a 
constable for a number of years in the township of Val- 
lejo. He knows what peace officers have to contend with 
and he went all out for the campaign to increase the sal- 
aries. 

While Chief Dierking has had plenty to occupy his 
mind and time in suppressing crime, working with Fed- 
eral agencies and giving good cooperation to outside towns 
and cities, he has never lost sight of other activities that 
mark a well-organized and operated Police Department. 



He has a splendidly equipped bureau of identification, 
to which he has assigned Inspector Harry Oliver. An in- 
novation the Chief has introduced is the indexing of the 
name of every person who contacts the Police Depart- 
ment. 

A man giving the name, say of John Brown, rings up 
the Department about a horse running loose in the streets 
of his neighborhood. Well, the name of John Brown, with 
his address, the date he 'phoned, about what he 'phoned, 
is put on a card and properly filed. 

Maybe a woman calls at the police station and tells 
about seeing some boys breaking a window in a vacant 
home. Her name and address is similarly treated. These 
names, with those who are arrested, or who make crim- 
inal complaints are kept in such a manner that they have 
proven a source of valuable assistance on numerous oc- 
casions. An example of this feature is: A letter is re- 
ceived from a South Dakota town asking if the Police 
Department can give any information about a certain per- 
son who, a short time previously, had moved to Vallejo. 
It is surprising, according to Inspector Oliver, how often 
this file will serve to locate the person the inquiry con- 
cerns. 

Another activity that the Chief has taken a great in- 
terest in, and which has become a great agency in saving 
school children from injur>' or death, is his Junior Traific 
Patrol. 

This work of carrying out the Chief's plans in this 
organization, is under the direction of Officer Howard 
Yatsie, formerly Chief of Police of Fairfield. Ofiicer 
Yatsie has a patrol force of 600 boys and girls, of this 
number 250 are young ladies, and they have taken their 
duties very seriously and have become as efiicient as the 
boy members. Not only does Yatsie handle the Vallejo 
schools' protectionary program, but he directs Junior 
Patrols for the entire county, and he has over 11,000 
school children to look after. 

Each year, through the efi^orts of Chief Dierking, the 
Horsemen's Association puts on a show for this School 
Patrol, and every two weeks the boys and girls are treat- 
ed to a free movie show. 

The annual review scheduled for June 9 will be a color- 
ful affair, as have been all previous reviews. 

Since its organization there hasn't been a single school 
child injured or killed going to or returning from the 
various schools of Vallejo. 

To handle the ever-growing housing projects with the 
thousands of tenants. Chief Dierking has added four new 
cars for radio patrol. He has three young ladies operat- 
ing the Police Radio station, they being Misses Florence 
Symes, Barbara Greathead and Kathleen Halitres. Also 
he has a matron on duty. She is Rose McListein, who 
was appointed last year. 

It's now Lieutenant Jack Stiltz, who was recently pro- 
f Continued on page i") > 



Pcige !4 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



April, 1945 



Mill Valley Police Well Trained 



Chief James McGovern, who has headed the PoHce 
Department of Mill Valley for more than 10 years, has 
a fixed idea that the best thing a peace officer can possess 
is a knowledge of the criminal laws of this country and 
especially know all there is to be learned in the Penal 
Code of California. 

Chief McGovern has put his idea into play and every 
member of the Mill Valley Police Department, as well 




Chief James McGovern 

as the corps of public-spirited citizens who enlisted in his 
auxiliary police, is given an intensive course of study on 
the provisions of the Penal Code. 

He has written up as line an array of questions and 
answers on the various laws and these are presented at a 
weekly round-table meeting of the men having charge of 
law enforcement. It is doubtful if any other body of 
peace officers is more familiar with the various laws, how 
to proceed in enforcing them, and what action might be 
taken in making an investigation or an arrest. 

We present herewith some of the questions and an- 
swers arranged by Chief McGovern and in subsequent 
issues of The Police and Peace Officers" Journal will 
present more: 

Q. At a boxing exhibition, the arena is sold out, but 
several men rush the gate and gain admittance, what 
charge can be placed against them? 

A. Their disorderly conduct is a breach of the peace 
and possibly assault — or they may even be charged with 
forcible entry. 

Q. Where a misdemeanor is concerned, may the pros- 
secution and defense mutually agree to a jury comprising 
less than 12 persons? If so, does this include Felony cases, 
and what is the least number of persons that may com- 
prise such juries? 

A. Yes, as to Misdemeanor cases. Felony cases are 



tried either with a jury of 12 or, upon a waiver, without 
any jury at all. 

Q. A man comes out of a store to find his car being 
driven away. He gets help from another autoist and 
overtakes the driver only to discover him to be the Agent 
of a finance company with orders to repossess the car. 
Is the finance company agent within legal bounds? Can 
the agent secure a criminal action if the other man beats 
him up and takes the car back again? 

A. First Question, Yes. If the finance company con- 
tract authorizes the taking. Second question, yes. As- 
sault and battery is not justified, even if the agent is in 
the wrong. 

Q. A man drives a car from Massachusetts to Cali- 
fornia and sells the automobile here although he has not 
completed all the payments due on same. Can both 
States prosecute him? 

A. No. Prosecution in Massachusetts unless the cir- 
cumstances of taking the car out of the State constituted 
embezzlement. Prosecution in California would be pos- 
sible only if the sale here was under Criminal circum- 
stances such as false pretenses, or car was embezzled in 
Massachusetts. 

Q. Are there any restrictions as to the language em- 
ployed in the information filed against a defendant in a 
criminal libel case where the allegation surrounds a highly 
indecent letter? 

A. No. No matter how filthy the language may be, 
it is proper to set it forth in the exact language used, and 
to prove it the same way. 

Q. "A"" writes a receipt over the genuine signature 
of "B"", his creditor, and then shows the same to "B's" 
credit manager for the purpose of securing additional 
credit and goods, which he receives. Is this fraud or 
forgery? 

A. Crime of forgery has been committed; also the 
crime of theft by false pretenses. 

Q. A husband who suspects that his wife is unfaith- 
ful, requests an Officer to assist him in raiding a hotel 
room. Is the Officer justified in so acting? 

A. No. It is not the Officer"s duty to handle such 
personal civil problems. If the husband wishes to pro- 
ceed criminally, he should secure a warrant of arrest. 

Q. In a crime where obscene and revolting language 
is introduced, has the court any right to strike such tes- 
timony from the records? 

A. No. If it is legal evidence, it's objectionable char- 
acter would be no ground for striking it out. 

Q. If a person riding a horse or bicycle violates a 
traffic regulation should he be issued a citation the same 
as a motorist? 

A. Exactly. And this includes Pedestrians. 

Q. Must you prove that the first wife is still alive 
in order to sustain a charge of Bigamy. 

(Continued on page Id) 



Apnl. J 945 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS^ JOURNAL 

Sausalito Crime Free 



Page 15 



Sausalito is starting out the year 1945 with a fine rec- 
ord of law enforcement for the war years. This pictur- 
esque Httle bay city, which affords such a fine panorama of 
scenic beauty from its attractive hillside homes, had its 
normal pre-war population expanded by the location of 
the Marinship shipbuilding plant and other companies 
engaged in producing the essential things necessary to 



lars. One burglary we noted on the records of the de- 
partment was that of a grocery store that was broken 
into. Chief Doyle and a couple of officers went on the 
job. They got their man a half mile away where he lived, 
by simply following a trail of frankfurters the man had 
taken and which dropped out of the bag he started out 
with, leaving a ver>' plain trail. He had intended to lift 




SAUSALITO POLICE DEPARTMENT 
Back, row, left to right — Sergeant /. C. O'Brien, Ogicers L. Chamberlain, C. Cobb. R. Guyette, C. E. Roberts and Sergeant F. B. French. 
Front row. left to right — Officers A. Bettencourt, D. F. McCarthy. Chief Doyle, Officers S. C. Kelly, and F. Smith. 



carry on the successful war this country is conducting. 
These plants brought thousands upon thousands of people 
to the city and its adjacent territory. Some of them 
would not stand the closest scrutiny of their past records, 
but we needed manpower and they were put to work. 

Naturally such an influ.x of strangers in any commun- 
ity would pose a problem for the Police Department.- 
Sausalito is no exception to this problem. But Sausalito 
has a Chief of Police, in the person of James F. Doyle, 
who knew how to face the problem, and being an exper- 
ienced Police Officer, he has done a job that has kept his 
little city mighty free from crime. Sure a little over in- 
dulgence of high powered beverages, a few efforts of the 
boys who like to toss the cubed ivories, and a misguided 
gent who drives off with somebody else's car, occur 
more frequently with an increased population, and in 
Sausalito Chief Doyle and his men have kept these of- 
fenders under complete control. 

In the past year there hasn't been a robbery worthy 
the name or a burglary that netted more than a few dol- 



some cigarettes he knew had been received that day by 
the owner of the store but the owner had taken the 
smokes home with him — a wise move — so the thief took 
some gum, "weinies" and some pennies he found in the 
place. 

Captain C. J. McCann who had charge of the Bureau 
of Identification since Chief Doyle has been head of the 
■ Department has resigned and is with the Standard Oil 
Company in Arabia. His place has been filled by Ser- 
geant Frank French, who has been with the Department 
for over a year. Sergeant French was formerly a railroad 
policeman and worked in the shipyards for a period of 
time. He is filling the job in a manner that takes a lot of 
worry off his Chief's shoulders, and has made the Bureau 
of Identification of Sausalito one of the best in Marin 
county, with a most complete file of finger prints, photo- 
graphs and other things that makes such a unit of police 
work invaluable. 

Through this bureau. Chief Doyle, through the work 
I Continued on page 75 j 



Page 16 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL April. 1945 

Oakland Police Chief Tracy 

Crime Is Definitely and Firmly Under Control; Efficiency, Co-Operation Reign in East Bay City 

B;y B. S. (Sandy) Sanders, Veteran ?{ewspaperman andPolice Reporter for the Oakland Post Enquirer 



After all, a metropolitan city is best judged by the man- 
ner in which its peace enforcement officers carry on. 

Large communities are always subject to an influx of 
out-of-town criminals. 

Only an alert and active police department can find 
the hide-outs, trace the character of the crimes and bring 
the criminals to justice. 

And when a world war comes along to bring hundreds 
of thousands of newcomers into the area, of every race and 
color, there is really a police problem. 

But quiet-spoken. Chief Robert P. (Bob) Tracy of the 
Oakland police department, the fellow who rose from the 




Chief Robert P. Tracy 

rank of a Montana cowboy to become head of the third 
largest city in California as its chief of police, seems to 
have solved the problem. 

Bob Tracy is always on the job. He always arrives at 
his office at 8:00 A. M., and immediately scans reports 
from the precinct Captains, Central, Northern, and 
Eastern, whose men cover an area of some 67 square 
miles, involving a population in excess of 500,000. 

Chief Tracy in the full two years he has been in office, 
has co-ordinated every division of the whole department, 
embracing the city jail, the identification bureau, the traf- 
fic division, the inspectors' bureau, the missing persons 
and juvenile detail, the domestic relations bureau, and the 
statistical division. 

This program of co-ordination, of working together and 
of understanding which each division of the police de- 
partment is trying to accomplish finds in Chief Bob Tracy 
a friend and counselor. 

Major crimes, robberies, murders, rapes and burglaries 
have definitely been kept in check as revealed in statistics 
carefully checked daily under the direction of Lieutenant 
Jesse Jackson with the details carefully prepared by Mrs. 
Philena P. Bickncll and her staff of young women, care- 
fully trained in the manipulation of the card index system. 



The juvenile crime and delinquency problem, according 
to Chief Tracy, has become a major one in Oakland's 
police administration, due largely to the influx of new- 
comers, to the fact that mothers and fathers are engaged 
in, war work and their children necessarily do not get the 
proper home care, nor are raised in the proper home en- 
vironment. 

As a result of Bob Tracy's understanding of this vital 
juvenile problem (and records reveal that 85 per cent 
of petty crime is committed by minors) the Oakland Ju- 
venile Department has been greatly enlarged during the 
past two years. 

It now boasts a personnel of 11 adults, three women 
and eight men, under the direction of veteran juvenile 
and missing person authority. Inspector Ed C. Summers, 
long a member of the Oakland Police Department. 

Summers, incidentally, like his chief, is a splendid co- 
operator. The newsmen who cover the police detail 
know that when news is really news Inspector Summers 
will give it out. 

But so much of the juvenile department's work is of 
an investigatory character, so much involves human re- 
lationships which Ed knows would not interest the read- 
ing public that it never gets into print. 

The traffic problem, like that in all cities and particu- 
larly in those where wartime activities have outdistanced 
all others, is still one of the major issues faced by Oak- 
land's police department. 

"But we have an able head of the department in Capt. 
Ira Reedy," says Chief Tracy, "and under him two splen- 
did Lieutenants, Neal Plunkett and Lester Divine, both 
graduates of the Northwestern University's traffic school, 
operated under the direction of the International Associa- 
tion of Police Chiefs at Evanston, Illinois." 

Records reveal that the two chief investigators — Vet- 
eran Charles Williams and Joseph Lawrence (his recent 
assistant) have done outstanding work in solving many 
hit-run accidents, involving fatalities and major injuries 
to innocent victims of the speeding motorist, the drunken 
driver. 

In prosecuting and in meting out justice to the of- 
fenders. Chief Tracy has found, he says, able cooperators 
in the district attorney's office and by the police court 
judges. 

Harry Miller, Assistant District Attorney, is in charge 
of the Prosecuting Attorney's office, while on the bench 
are veterans Judge Chris B. Fox and Jos. A. Kennedy. 

And speaking of the courts, a movement is under way 
to create a third court as the judges for months and years 
have been handling overcrowded calendars. 

Because the Police Courts, the Police Department, the 
(Continued on page 82) 



April, 1945 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 17 



Phone GLencourt 5040 



.R.O. 



We specialize in Maintenance, Re- 
pair and Operating Supplies for 
every purpose. Replacements parts 
for Automobiles, Trucks, Tractors 
and Marine Engines. Tools, Shop 
Equipment, and Heavy Hardware. 



GEO. A. KREPLIN CO. 

3060 BROADWAY 
OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 



Phone HIgate 0874 

Compliments of 

WESTERN FORGE AND 
TOOL WORKS 



QUALITY FORCINGS 



209 Jefferson Street 
Oakland, Calif. 



JOSEPHS 

DINING ROOM AND 
LOUNGE 



SERVING SPECIAL DINNERS 



435 East 18th Street 
Oakland, Calif. 

Phone TEmplebar 9273 



A. V. Piotti 



H. Michaelson 



CLUB PLAY BOY 

FINE LIQUORS - GOOD FOOD 

5819 Foothill Blvd. 
Oakland, California 

Phone KEllog 4-4867 



BABE'S PLAY HAVEN 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

4325 E. 14th Street 
OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Phone KEllog 4-4867 



Page 18 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL April, 1945- 

Chief Frank Kelly of San Rafael 

San Rafael, a beautiful city and the heart of Marin class. He brought honor both to himself and to the City 
County, is proud of its fast rising and efficient Chief of of San Rafael. 



Police Frank Kelly. The feeling of proudness is not con- 
fined to the City of San Rafael but it is county-wide. No 
other man in police work has won the esteem and admira- 
tion and respect of the people that has been gained by 
Chief Kelly. 

Although San Rafael has grown in population by leaps 
and bounds, an influx of thousands doing war work, there 
has been no crime wave in San Rafael, 




Chief KeUy iisnig pownrjid comparison microscope m his studies 
ai FBI academy laboratorv in Wds/iington. D. C. 

The reason is Chief Frank Kelly and his faithful 
officers. The Chief means business in the handling of 
police matters; he is stern, but also gives to each and all a 
fair and square deal. He is tough on the bad ones and 
ever kind and considerate of those in need and oppressed. 

By showing marked ability as a humane Chief of Po- 
lice, the City Council of San Rafael honored Chief Kelly 
by sending him back to the National Police Academy, 
sponsored by the F.B.I. , to obtain detailed and skilled 
instruction. Prior to the action by the City Council Chief 
Kelly had already been selected by the Federal Bureau 
of Investigation. He is the first man from Marin County 
selected to attend this school, which is a signal honor 
in itself. 

Chief Kelly made an enviable record while attending 
the National Police Academy. His grades were among 
the highest in the student body and he was commended 
by his instructors for his scholastic work. His drawing 
of a police problem was done so skillfully that it attracted 
national attention and a photostat was made of the draw- 
ing and given to the members of the class as a perfect 
example. While at the academy Chief Kelly won the 
respect of his instructors, as well as the students in his 



Kelly's work in crime detection, identification, finger- 
printing, photography, statement taking, ballistics and 
markmanship was of a high order. 

He has also shown ability in the selection of the men 




Chief Special FBI Agent Tsiatc Pieper ami 
Chief Fran\ Kelly of San Rafael 

who now compose the San Rafael police force. His men 
are loyal, enthusiastic and cooperative. Much credit is 
due to his men for their efficiency in keeping down crime. 



S.F.D.P. FIRST AUTOMOBILE 
DRIVER DIES 

Officer Edward J. McKevitt, for over 40 years a 
member of the San Francisco Police Department, died 
early last month, after a short illness. He was in later 
years assigned to the city treasurer's office. However, he 
had the distinction of being the driver of the first auto- 
mobile used by the Police Department. In 1905 the 
then Chief of Police Jere Dinan got permission to pur- 
chase a ear for police work, and he was given a four- 
cylinder Franklin car. There was no eligible list for 
driver but young Officer Edward McKevitt, -who had 
been in the Department for a couple of years, and who 
knew how to drive a car, was given the job as chauffeur 
of that first purchase that has grown today into the fleet 
of scores of modern, speedy cars used in patrolling beats, 
in making investigations by the Inspectors Bureau and 
for other purposes of police activity. 

Officer McKevitt continued as a driver in the De- 
partment for many years, driving for the Chief of Police 
and then one of the Detective Bureau cars. He finally 
got himself transferred to station duty and spent the 
most of his time with the old Bush, now the Northern, 
station. Among his survivors is a son, Edward McKevitt 
Jr., now an officer with the Central Station. 



April, 1945 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 

San Bruno's Police Department 



Page J 9 



San Bruno, a little city less than ten miles from San 
Francisco, for years was accepted by the thousands upon 
thousands of motorists who travel north or south on El 
Camino Real as just a small town where you had only to 
watch for a crossing singal on the Real, the first one after 
leaving Daly City. People never heard much of San 



army keeps upwards of 1000 men on duty; the coast 
guard has an enlarged force on the bay waters of Mills 
Field; and the families of the men who look after the 
many airplanes United Airlines, Pan-American Company 
and TWA entering and leaving Mills Field — The San 
Francisco Airport — want to live near their families, and 




SAN BRUNO POLICE DEPARTMENT 
Front row. left to right — Olficer Arthur Brnton, Chief Maher, Sergeant Henry W. Jvjonli. Center mw — Officers Adolph Hernan- 
dez, Fran\ Gomes and Peter Evans. Bac\ row — Oficers Russel! Ciuiningfiam and Frank, Bottari, and Sergeant John Bedford. 



Bruno economically, or otherwise, except maybe Tan- 
foran race track with within the city limits. It, from the 
beginning has always been a steadily growing community 
drawing a fine class of people as residents, and seldom 
made the front pages of the big city papers for crimes 
committed in its midst. 

But a lot of motorists who can't get very far away 
from their homes these days on account of gasoline ra- 
tioning, would be surprised to know how San Bruno has 
grown. How it has become one of the liveliest little cities 
on the Peninsula; how it had a large and important navy 
base; how hundreds of new homes have been erected to 
take care of war workers, and the personnel of the air- 
port, the Coast Guard, and others engaged in essential 
industry. 

On the Tanforan racing property the navy has located 
one of its greatest naval bases, housing of upward of 15,- 
000. Across the street the navy has erected a large number 
of barracks for men and officers. At Mills Field the 



they are doing just that, for new, up-to-date homes have 
been erected for their accommodation. 

Eitel-McCuUough, Inc., manufacturers of radios and 
radio equipment for the various armed forces of the 
United States, a Horatio Alger story of how a couple of 
bright young men became millionaires out of their ability 
to manufacture these needed essentials and know how to 
manage the business which at its peak employed some 800 
men and women. Many of these have their homes in 
San Bruno. 

Outside of the navy personnel and the army and coast 
guard, the population of San Bruno is now over 10,000 
people, a gain of 60 per cent over the figure given by 
the 1940 U. S. Census. 

During all this activity all this phenomenal growth in 
population San Bruno has remained a law abiding com- 
munity. Since the war started there hasn't been a murder 
or a robbery. There has been a few and mighty few bur- 
(Continued on page 19) 



Page 20 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, J 945 



Menio Park*s New Police Chief 



Menlo Park has a new Chief of PoHce, in the person 
of Jack Yount, who had been serving as acting police head 
since the resignation of Chief Thomas Kearny on De- 
cember 12 last year. The city council made the appoint- 
ment permanent at a meeting some weeks ago. 

Chief Yount will give the city as fine police protection 
as any community in this area has. He is a well set-up 
young man, over six feet tall, and has the ability to assim- 



Yet with all this added population with its attendant 
activities, crime is somthing that doesn't occur very often 
in Menlo Park. 

There hasn't been a single robbery since 1940, and the 
burglaries that have occurred during that time could be 
counted on the fingers of both your hands. Murders are 
something that has never attracted the attention of the 
Police Department. 




MENLO PAR'S POLICE DEPARTMENT 
Left to right — Chief Jack Yount, Officers Homer "Mack" Thomas, Raymond "Ray" Smith, 

and Joseph Ferriera. 



Fred "Bud" Roach, George Potter 



ilate all phases of any work he undertakes, as is indicated 
by his progress on the Menlo Park Police force since his 
appointment in 1940. 

Menlo Park is a swell little city just north of the county 
line of San Mateo and Santa Clara and lies in the con- 
fines of the first named. Unlike most bay district com- 
munities, it has no war projects of any kind, excepting 
that it has Dibble U. S. General Hospital within its con- 
fines. But, owing to its fine scenic attractions, its excellent 
climate it has become the living abode of many men and 
women engaged in war work in San Francisco and San 
Mateo county plants. 

Normally it has a population of 3000 people, but the 
influx of folks helping out in this war it now has easily 
6000 people living within its three miles square. Menlo 
Park offers the best in shopping facilities, easily reached 
and for which ample parking space is provided, and Chief 
Yount estimates that it is the shopping center of 25,000 
in addition to the 6000 now residing in the city limits. 



A lot of automoibles pass through the main street of 
the town on the El Cammo Real, and these, with the 60 
miles of city streets, furnish the major part of the work of 
the police ofiicers, and they do a swell job of keeping 
down fatal accidents, for in 1944 only one death resulted 

EAST SHORE MARKET 

BEER - WINES - MEATS - GROCERIES 
Let us serve you 



1036 SOUTH 47th STREET 



RICHMOND. CALIF. 



Phone 2 72 

STANDARD MARKET 

BAIT - DRINKS - GROCERIES 

154 1 FOURTH STREET SAN RAFAEL. CALIFORNLA 



April. )94J 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 21 



from a traffic accident. The average arrest for violation 
of the traffic laws is 85, and when once you get a ticket 
you might as well make up your mind to pay the penalty 
for there is no squaring of a traffic "beef". Police .Judge 
E. J. Ryan gives the fullest cooperation to the Police De- 
partment. 

Mayor Donald Fisher heads the board of councilmen, 
which includes Wallace H. Brown, Charles P. Burgess, 
Roy L. Grey and Lloyd Neumann, the latter in charge 
of Police and Safety. 

They have given the Police Department sufficient auto- 
mobiles and equipped them with Two-way Radio, hooked 
up with the Palo Alto Police Radio Station. 

Chief Yount was horn in Oklahoma. He came to Cali- 
fornia in 1920, and shortly after joined the U. S. Army 
and was sent to Honolulu, where he served for over five 
years. Returning to the States, he located in San Fran- 
cisco, engaging in the jewelry business and for some time 
was employed by various special police patrol companies. 
In 1933 he moved to North Palo Alto, and opened up 
a jewelry business in Palo Alto, which he conducted for 
a few years, then he organized a private patrol company 
of his own, and was following that line of work when he 
was called to Menlo Park to join the Police Department 
in 1940. 

With his experience in private law enforcement, his 
army training, and his energetic approach to any assign- 
ment given him, he soon made his presence on the Menlo 
Police Department felt. 

He is an enthusiastic member of the Peninsula Police 
Officers Association and takes an active part as a member 
of the Lion's Club which in Menlo Park has done much 
for the welfare of the thriving little city. 

After coming to Palo Alto he met his present wife 
and they have a two-year old daughter, Alice. 

Chief Yount has a force of six officers on his force, 
having been given another one since his appointment as 
Chief. 



Phone Richmond 6020 



Walter Tribelhorn 



WONDERSHEEN PRODUCTS, INC. 

Manufacturers of 
HIGH GRADE FINISHES AND VARNISHES 



105 5 SAN PABLO AVENUE 



RICHMOND, CALIF. 



Phone Richmond 3409 



THE ORIGINAL 



PIRATES CAVE 

Delicious Sea Food, Steaks and Chops 

Well Known From Coast to Coast 
Oyster Loaves to Take Home 



1U32 MACDONALD AVENUE 



RICHMOND. CALIF. 



Phone Richmond 72 1 



Walter B. Trulson 



TRULSON MOTOR CO. 



RICHMOND'S ONLY FORD DEALER 



23rd STREET and BISSELL AVENUE 



RICHMOND, CALIF. 



Bill Luiz. Owner 



Al Luiz, Owner 



THE HUB . . . Cocktails 

6 19 Macdonald Ave. Phone Richmond iM3 Richmond, Calif. 



FERNLEAF BILLIARD PARLOR 

612 Macdonald Ave. Phone Richmond 152 Richmond, Calif. 

7 19 Mam St. Phone Martinez 1599 Martinez, Calif. 



Phone Richmond 2420 



C. G. Steiner, Manager 



HOTEL CARQUINEZ 

RICHMOND'S LEADING HOTEL 
Coffee Shop and Dining Room - Cocktail Lounge 



TENTH STREET and NEVIN AVENUE 



RICHMOND. CALIF. 



Compliments of 



BLAKE BROTHERS COMPANY 



International Recreation Club 



RICHMOND 



CALIFORNIA 



MONTEREY MARKET 



I 10 GEORGIA STREET 



VALLEJO, CALIF. 



Phone 3-9871 



The place to get a good night's rest 
after a hard day's drive 



PARK AUTO COURT 

Hotel Accommodations - Housekeeping Cottages 
Completely New and Modern . . . Moderate Rates 

HIGHWAY 40 & NEBRASKA Rte. No. 1, Box No. 764 VALLEJO 



Phone Richmond 5002 



L. R. Hollenbeck 



VICTORY MILL 8c LUMBER CO. 

SERVICE COUNTS TODAY 
Cabinets - Millwork - Sash - Door 



TENTH STREET and OHIO AVENUE 



RICHMOND, CALIF. 



GROCERIES - MEATS - GENERAL STORE 

1303 PANHANDLE BOULEVARD RICHMOND, CALIF. 



Phone Richmond 5 



Special service 25 per cent additional 



THE HOME 

DRY CLEANERS - LAUNDERERS 

We Do Thrifty. Damp Wash and Dry Wash 

16th STREET and NEVIN AVENUE RICHMOND, CALIF. 



Phone 5 79 



S. Robinson, Prop. 

STERLING'S TAVERN 

Serving the BEST in MIXED DRINKS 

CALIFORNIA 



t'age 22 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April. J 945 




NORTHERN CALIFORNIA 

POLICE COMMUNICATION OFFICERS 

ASSOCIATION 

Henry L. Bogardus, President 
J, D. HosSACK, Secretary-Treasurer 



A special meeting of the Northern CaHfornia PoHce 
Communication Officers Association was held February 5, 
1945, in the Hall of Justice, San Francisco. The meeting 
was opened at 1:30 P. M. hy President Bogardus with a 
brief statement concerning the action necessary on the 
frequency allocation plan and the possible curtailment of 
the present repeater station frequencies. 

McMurphy reported that everyone should make known 
what frequencies would be required by them as now was 
the time to act. He then informed the group of the chan- 
nels now open and suggested the subject be discussed 
thoroughly. 

After due discussion by the interested members present, 
the following motions were proposed and voted on favor- 
ably: 

Motion by McMurphy, seconded by George Burton, 
that the allocation of .if channels in the .lO and 40 mc. 
band were satisfactory. 

Motion by LeBouef, seconded by Jack Barlich, that the 
allocation of 2 1 channels in the 42 to 44 mc. band are sat- 
isfactory. 

Motion by Burton, seconded by John Maybee, that the 
frequencies in the 102 to 108 mc. band are not desired 
due to the harmonic relationship with the amateur fre- 
quencies in the 50 to 54 mc. amateur band. 

Motion by Naschke, seconded by Sgt. McKee, that we 
desire to retain the present repeater station frequencies of 
116.15, 116..S'i, 116.95, 117.35, 117.7'!. 118.15 and 
118.^5 mc. Consideration should be given this request as 
there is no activity of other services on these frequencies, 
service is taken from such repeater stations in several di- 
rections and reception of repeater station is not line of 
sight. 

Motion by Harrington, seconded by John Hartnet that 
the allocation of frequencies in the 152 to 156 mc. are 
satisfactory. Consideration should be due in view of the 
harmonic relationship with the amateur band on 50 to 
54 mc. 

Motion by Bob Schuler, seconded by George Burton. 
Exchange the 152 to 156 mc. police band with the 144 to 
148 amateur band because of the possible harmonic inter- 
ference to a police band on 152 to 156 mc. from the 50 
to '54 mc. amateur band. 

Motion by McMurphy, seconded by Jim Lewis that 
some 2 mc. band for exclusive use of police repeater serv- 
ice between 100 and 200 mc, be designated as there is 
no way of knowing what television channels will be used 
in any particular area. 

The regular monthly meeting of the Northern Cali- 



fornia Police Communication Officers was held Thurs- 
day evening, February 8, at the Eitel-McCullough, Inc., 
tube plant in San Bruno. Herb Becker acted as host at 
the excellent steak dinner served the assembly prior to 
the meeting. The meeting was called to order by Presi- 
dent Bogardus at 8 P. M. with introduction of members 
and guests present. Herb Becker introduced the Eimac 
personnel and then presented Ray Gada with a filament 
for the Zero-Tron which was presented to him by Eimac 
about a year ago. The minutes of the special meeting held 
in San Francisco February 5 were read and approved as 
read. 

President Bogardus appointed the Board of Directors, 
consisting of Geo. Burton, Lloyd McKinney, John May- 
bee, Chas. Simpson, President Bogardus and Vice-Presi- 
dent E. H. McKee to act as frequency committee for the 
year. 

Hossack and Greening reported on the standard code 
and the results of the meeting with the Bay Counties 
Peace Officers committee concerning such a code. 

President Bogardus appointed the following commit- 
tees to act during the year: 

Interference Committee — Ray Gada, Chas. Simpson, 
Merrill LeBouef and Alvin Taggart. 

Guest Speaker Committee — Jim Lewis, Herb Watson, 
Don Hossack and B. McMurphy. 

Resolution Committee — Jim Lewis, Don Wood, B. 
McMurphy and Lloyd McKinney. 

The following new membership applications were read 
and voted on favorably: O. H. Brown, Commercial mem- 
ber, Eimac; S. J. Combs, Commercial member, R.C.A., 
and J. A. Sykes, regular member, Petaluma Police Dept. 
KQCY. Honorary member, Sheriif Geo. R. Houx, Co' 
lusa County. 

The new radio numbers now being used by the Cali- 
fornia Highway Patrol was discussed briefly by E. H. 
McKee, Ray Gada, Jim Lewis and McMurphy. 

McMurphy requested a committee be appointed to 
draw up an operating procedure manual, basing it on the 
one issued by APCO. Director Hippley and Jim Lewis 
discussed the need for such a manual especially in train- 
ing new radio personnel. McMurphy then made a mo- 
tion, seconded by George Burton that such a committee 
be appointed. The motion was carried and President 
Bogardus appointed McMurphy, Geo, Burton, Jim Lewis, 
Director Hippley, Hossack and Taggart as the committee. 



Active and Ho 



Members Present 



Henry L. Bogardus, Dept, of Elec, San Francisco, 



April. 1945 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 23 



KGPD; C. H, Cross, CHP, Bay Bridge; Leo M. Reese, 

Mendocino-Lake County, KAVL; Homer Jones, Dept. of 
Elec, KALT; Manuel Trinta, Police Dept., San Mateo, 
KQDA; H. M. Watson, Police Dept., Richmond, KRLW 
G. K. Burton, Sheriff's O&ce, Contra Costa County, 
KQCE; Ivan Hudson, Police Dept., Piedmont, KQCP; 
Lloyd F. McKinney, Police Dept., Berkeley, KSW; Ed. 
Amsler, Police Dept., Palo Alto, KGHK; Donald T. 
Wood, Chief of Police, San Anselmo, KQBP; W. V. 
Stancil, Motorola Co.; E. H. McKee, CHP Sacramento, 
KADJ; John M. Wood, Electronic Service, Redwood 
City; Dan Hewitt, Sheriff's Office, Redwood City, 
KRGX. 

John A. Sykes, PoHce Dept., Petaluma, KQCY; Wm. 
Koch, Forestry Dept., Sacramento; John Maybee, Sonoma 
County, KSRM; Geo. W. Hippley, Director, Police De- 
partment, San Francisco, KGPD; M. W. Hewlett, Police 
Dept., San Francisco, KGPD; J. D. Hossack, CHP, Bay 
Bridge, KRBU; Herb Becker, Eitel-McCullough, Inc., 
San Bruno; Carrol Messier, Sheriff's Office, Martinez, 
KQCE; D. P. Lucido, Police Dept., Pittsburg, KQBT; 
B. M. McMurphy, Sheriff's Office, Alameda County, 
KPDA; Arthur Quement, Wholesale Radio, San Jose; 
Herman J. Schwandt, Police Dept., San Jose, KGPM; 
Henri Kirby, Police Dept., San Jose, KGPM; J. M. Lewis, 
Sheriff's Office, Marin County, KSRC. 

A. J. Morganthal, Police Dept., Oakland, KALT; J. 
A. Greening, Sheriff's Office, Alameda County, KPDA; 
M. Q. Brunton, Link, San Francisco, KQW; Ray Gada, 
Police Dept., Modesto; Al Taggart, Police Dept., Oak- 
land, KALT; E. S. Naschke, CHP, Sacramento, KADJ; 
Geo. R. Houx, Sheriff, Colusa County, KQRO; Merill 
LeBouef, Sutter- Yuba Counties, KADS. 

Guests Present 

Bill Eitel, Eimac, San Bruno; Gordon T. Howes, Eimac 
San Bruno; J. H. Hallock, F.C.C., San Francisco; F. V. 
Sloan, Inspector in Charge, F.C.C. San Francisco; F. W. 
Hughs, General Electric, Belmont, KGEI; George Wun- 
derlich, Eimac, San Bruno; Rad Leonard, Eimac, San 
Bruno; Ward L. Anderson, CHP, Bay Bridge, KRBU; B. 
E. Damen, San Mateo; R. V. LaRue, Police Dept., Berke- 
ley, KSW; Ernie Werder, Sheriff's Office, San Mateo 
County, KRGX; W. J. Wisnom, Chief of Police, Hills- 
borough, KSPH; Lloyd Armett, Sheriff's Office, Sonoma 
County, KSRM; J. A. McCullough, Eimac, San Bruno. 
* * * 

The regular monthly meeting of the Northern Califor- 
nia Police Communication Officers was held Thursday, 
March 8th, at the Alexander Hamilton Hotel in San 
Francisco. Henry Bogardus acted as host at the luncheon 
preceding the meeting. 

The meeting was called to order at 1:30 P. M. by 
President Bogardus with the introduction of members 
and guests present. The minutes of the February meet- 
ing were read and approved as read. 

McMurphy reported on the high-frequency emergency 
net work and presented a block diagram showing the 
method of operation. Such a net would do away with 



the necessity of each station monitoring numerous fre- 
quencies. 

Application for membership received from John Rain- 
bault and Walter Keller were voted on favorably. 

Fred Deetken of the General Electric Co., demon- 
strated a wire recorder and explained its operation and 
applications to the group. 

The Standard Code was presented for approval and a 
motion for recommendation was made by McMurphy 
and seconded by Hudson. The motion was carried. 

Motion by Burton seconded by John Maybee, that the 
resolution committee draw up a report on the emergency 
high-frequency net and submit it to the Bay Counties 
Peace Officers for their consideration was voted on favor- 
ably. 

Bogardus and Burton reported on the use of series of 
dots preceding a transmission of a message of which a re- 
broadcast is desired from other stations. Motion by Hos- 
sack seconded by McMurphy that such a procedure be 
started April 1st was passed. 

McKee reports that a meeting between the Northern 
and Southern California groups would be desirable in the 
near future, either in Fresno or Monterey. President Bo- 
gardus appointed a committee of McKee, McMurphy, 



JACK'S SHACKS 



509 SOUTH 15th STREET 



RICHMOND, CALIF. 



MAHERS SUNDRIES STORE 

DRUG SUNDRIES - LUNCHES - FOUNTAIN 
CIGARS - CANDY 



2 748 SAN PABLO AVENUE 



SAN PABLO, CALIF. 



Phone Richmond I 182 



HOTEL MAC 



5 WASHINGTON STREET 



RICHMOND. CALIF. 



TOP HAT CLUB 

WINE, BEER and LIQUOR 
SANDWICHES - DANCING 

RODEO CALIFORNIA 



SPENCER'S GROTTO 



ON FERRYBOAT "ENCINAL" 



BENICIA 



CALIFORNIA 



Page 24 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 1945 



Burton, McKinney, Le Bocuf, Lewis and Hippley to ar- 
range the date and place of the meeting. 

Naschke reported on a bill now before the state assem- 
bly to tax and license radio repair men. 

Stancil reported on the recent meeting of the Southern 
California group wherein they had discussed the Standard 
Code compiled by the NCPCOA and their possible affi- 
liation with APCO. 

Active and Honorary Members Present 

Donald T. Wood, Chief of Police, San Anselmo, 
KQBP; Jno. A. Greening, Div. Chief Deputy, Alameda 
County, KPDA; A. J. Morgenthal, Inspector of Police, 
Oakland, KALT: Al Taggart, Chief Dispatcher, Oakland, 
KALT: G. A. Tudhope, Asst. Supt. Electrical, Oakland, 
KALT; W. H. Harrington, Radio Engineer, Sheriff's 
Office, San Mateo County, KRGX; W. J. Wisnom, Chief 
of Police, Hillsborough, KSPH; Homer Jones, Radio Tech., 
Oakland, KALT; E. H. McKee, Sgt. Calif. Highway 
Patrol, Sacramento, KADJ; W. V. Stancil, Motorola Co.; 
Ray Gada, Tech. Sheriff's Office, Modesto, KASE; Herb 
Becker, Eimac Co., San Bruno; Henry Brown, Eimac 
Co., San Bruno; Wm. F. Koch, CO, California Forestry; 
E. S. Naschte. Supr. RTO, CHP, KADJ, Sacramento; 
M. LeBoeuf, Supr. and Engr. Sutter- Yuba Police, KADS 
Dan Hewitt, Redwood City, KRGX; Sgt. M. Trinta, 
San Mateo Police, KQDA; Henr>' L. Bogardus, Sgt. San 
Francisco Police, KGPD; Frank J. Matjasich, Sgt. San 
Francisco Police. KGPD; Mott Q. Brunton, Pres. Link. 
N.Y.C. 

B. McMurphy, Tech. Alameda County, KPDA; F. V. 
Sloan, Inspector in Charge FCC, San Francisco, Guest; 
Wm. Pflaum, Chief of Police, Piedmont, KQCP; Ivan 
Hudson, Technician, Piedmont Police, KQCP; Lloyd F. 
McKinney, Radio Engineer Berkeley Police, KSW; Walt- 
er R. Keller, Electrical Supt., Santa Cruz, KGZT; Carrol 
Messier, Tech., Sheriff's Office. Martinez, KQCE; James 
A. Sykes, Tech.. Petaluma Police. KQCY; John K. May- 
bee, Radio Engineer, Santa Rosa, KSRM; F. I. Deet- 
ken. Transmitter Representative General Electric, San 
Francisco; E. W. Lindfeldt, Chief Opr., Sacramento Po- 
lice, KNGF; J. H. Carlton, Tech., Sacramento Police, 
KNGF; Ward L. Anderson, Tech., CHP, SFOBB, KRBU 
Guest; George K. Burton, Radio Suprv., Sheriff's Office, 
Martinez, KQCE; J. D. Hossack, Suprv., RTO, CHP, 
SFOBB, KRBU; F. V. Newcomer, Guest. 

The regular monthly meeting of the Northern Cali- 
fornia Police Communication Officers' Association was 
held Thursday, April 12th, at Crystal Springs, with Walt 
Harrington acting as host at the luncheon preceding the 
meeting. 

The meeting was called to order by President Bogardus 
at 2 P.M. with introduction of members and guests present. 
The minutes of the regular March meeting were read and 
approved as read. 

Mr. Greening reported on the recent meeting of the 
Bay Counties Peace Officers' Association and stated that 
that organization had approved the plan of ;in emergency 



Phone Vallejo 3-9948 



Ken Overlin. Ex-Middleweight Champ 



PORTHOLE CAFE 



Tommy Kilbane. Former Leading Contender 
2 19 GEORGIA STREET VALLEJO. CALIF. 

Phone 400 

CLIFF MULLEN 

shell Products - Tires - Batteries - Lubrication 



FIRST and "J- STREET 



BENICIA. CALIF. 



Phone 3-4932 



Reguera & Morilla 



SOLANO MARKET 



GROCERIES - FRUITS - MEATS 



653 BENICIA ROAD 



VALLEJO. CALIF. 



Phone Richmond 5497 Home Made Pies Home Cooking 



THE AKSARBEN 

Meet Your Friends Here — "The Truck Drivers Do" 



1090 SAN PABLO AVE.. Opp. Sunset Auto Court RICHMOND, CAL. 



Phone Richmond 2 38 



Joe Sindicich 



EAST RICHMOND GROCERY 

Quality Groceries, Fruits and Vegetables 



i 



999 SAN PABLO AVE. 



RICHMOND, CALIF. 



Phone 2-0971 



Hank Schamun 



D. L. Goforth 



RANCHO MEAT MARKET 



ONLY THE FINEST MEATS 



1325 SONOMA STREET 



VALLEJO, CALIF. 



Phone 3-5625 



A Modern Store For a Modern City 



VAIL FURNITURE CO. 



HOME FURNISHINGS 



TENNESSEE and MARIN 



VALLEJO, CALIF. 



CUPIE, Mgr. Club Room 



C. O. MARTIN. Prop. 



THE PASTIME CLUB 

CANDY - TOBACCOS - NOVELTIES 
Under New Management 



317 VIRGINIA STREET 



VALLEJO. CALIF. 



April, 1945 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 2 J 



high-frequency radio net and would draft a letter to the 
F.C.C. requesting same. The standard code and request for 
rebroadcast signal was also approved and is now being 
referred to the State Peace Officers' Association. It was 
suggested that all departments start the use of the standard 
code by May 1st if possible. 

Chas. Simpson and E. H. McKee reported on the 
progress of the coming meeting of the NCPCOA and the 
CPRA in Monterey on May 11th and 12th. Simpson 
states that, after contacting the hotel managers in Mon- 
terey, he does not believe it possible to obtain more than 
appro.ximately twenty overnight accommodations and also 
called the group's attention to the ODT Directive restrict- 
ing any such gathering to fifty persons or less. After dis- 
cussion of the problem by Simpson, Koch, McKee, Lewis 
and Bogardus, it was decided to send out cards to the 
members of the NCPCOA to ascertain how many mem- 
bers would require overnight accommodations and a letter 
be sent to H. B. Calvert of the CPRA asking him to advise 
Chas. Simpson how many members of the Southern group 
would require similar accommodations. 

Assembly Bill 1426 was read to the members and a copy 
given each. A letter from the CPRA to Vernon Kilpatrick, 
the author of the bill, was read and, after discussion of 
both the bill and letter, a motion was made by McMurphy 
and seconded by Naschke that the NCPCOA endorse the 
letter from CPRA and advise Mr. Kilpatrick of our action. 
It was also pointed out by Lewis and Tudhope that such a 
bill that would aifect many men now in the armed forces 
should be held over until after the war. 

McMurphy reported on the progress of the high- 
frequency emergency net and requested that all depart- 
ments that desire to use the net advise the Secretary. 
McMurphy also stated that it may be possible to use 
repeater service from the proposed Board of Education 
Radio System now under consideration. 

Mott Brunton reported for the Commercial member 
and told of some of the steps made in the advancement of 
radio communication by the commercial companies. 

The regular May meeting of the NCPCOA is to be held 
jointly with the CPRA in Monterey on May 11th and 
12th. Henri Kirby requested the June meeting he held in 
San Jose. 

Meeting adjourned at 3:30 P.M. 

—J. D. Hoss.^CK, Sec.-Treas. JiCPCOA. 

Phone Vallejo 3-9938 -Geo. Beck. Owner 

VALLEJO FOOD CENTER 

Vallejo's Leading Downtown 
Independent 



616 MARIN STREET 



VALLEJO. CALIF. 



Phone 3-7544 W. H. Wiggins E. H. Case 

CHISHOLM & DICKEY 

FUNERAL HOME 

"Dependable Service*' - Established in 1921 



DONNELLY'S TAVERN 

Where the Best People Meet 
ALL KINDS OF GOOD LIQUOR AND MIXED DRINKS 



3 04 GEORGIA STREET 



VALLEJO, CALIF. 



Two Convenient Locations 



Hi-Ho No. 1 

826 MARIN STREET 

Hi-HoNo. 2 

328 GEORGIA STREET 



VALLEJO 



CALIFORNIA 



BONIFACIO LODGE 2-C-D-A 



FLEET CLUB 



7 12 GEORGIA STREET 



VALLEJO, CALIF. 



Lloyd's Soda Bar and Coffee Shop 

The Handiest Place in Town 
GOOD SERVICE 



614 MARIN STREET 



VALLEJO, CALIF. 



Phone 3-5008 We Put Up Orders to Take Out 

Chinese-American Dishes 

NEW RICE BOWL 

Dinners - Merchants Lunch - Steak • Chop Suey - Chow Mein 
Fried Chicken - Fried Shrimps 



31 I VIRGINIA STREET 



VALLEJO, CALIF. 



Phone Richmond 2489 



CLUB THUNDERBIRD 

A NICE PLACE TO SPEND A PLEASANT EVENING 
BEST OF LIQUORS AND MIXED DRINKS 



2639 SAN PABLO AVENUE 



SAN PABLO, CALIF. 



CLUB NEWS 

Bob Geer, Owner 
BEER, WINES, CIGARS and CIGARETTES 



4 7 GEORGIA STREET 



VALLEJO, CALIF. 



BONHAIN'S MARKET 



540 BENICIA ROAD 



VALLEJO, CALIF. 



524 CAPITOL STREET 



VALLEJO, CALIF. 



Page 26 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, ]945 



BAY COUNTIES' 



Peace Officers^ Association 



MEETINGS EVERY MONTH 



Chief Howard A. Zink, President 



Captain Bernard McDonald, Secretary-Treasurer 



The first meeting of the year of the Bay Counties Peace 
Officers Association was held April 6, at Pierre and 
Grace's Cafe De Paris on the El Camino Real, in Ather- 
ton. Chief E. J. Farrell was host on this occasion and he 
and Pierre were complimented by the large number of 
members and guests who attended for the fine luncheon 
served, thick cuts of prime ribs of beef heading the at- 
tractions of the menu. 

This was the first meeting over which Chief H. A. Zink 
of Palo Alto, elected to serve for 1945, has presided over. 

Under the heading of reports of committees Deputy 
Sheriff John A. Greening for the special radio code com- 
mittee appointed last December at the Alameda meeting, 
reported on what had been accomplished in conjunction 
with the Northern California Police Communications As- 
sociation relative to a uniform radio code. He said the 
two associations had agreed on a code that they hoped 
would be looked upon with favor by the Federal Com- 
munications Commission. He had copies of the code which 
he distributed to the heads of various police departments 
and sheriff's offices and pointed out that if the Southern 
California Police Communications Association agreed 
with the provisions of the code it would be standard for 
all of the state. 

On motion of Deputy Greening the code as he repre- 
sented it was unanimously adopted by the members of the 
Bay Counties Association. 

The main subject for the meeting was a panel dis- 
cussion of standards for police officers of the state. 

Chief Tracy of Oakland, Chief Holstrom of Berkeley 
and Chief Dullea of San Francisco presented their ideas 
for the larger cities and Chief Wood of San Anselmo and 
Chief Ferral of Atherton spoke for the smaller cities. John 
Curley of International Association of Chiefs of Police 
Traffic Division gave an overall resume of the important 
topic under discussion. 

All of the speakers were agreed that the peace officers 
of this state should work toward the end of making law 
enforcement a real profession. There was some contro- 
versy among the speakers as to what means should be 
taken to raise the standards so the calling could be pro- 
fessionalized. It was admitted by those on the panel that 



better working conditions, better wages and better pen- 
sion provisions should be had to attract more capable 
young men into the various police departments of Cali- 
fornia. 

Some of the speakers urged the maximum age for en- 
trance to a police force should be reduced, and there was 
some difference of opinion as to how tall or how much 
a man must weigh to qualify as a police officer. 

There was general agreement that the educational re- 
quirements should be no less than a high school gradua- 
tion certificate, or its equivalent, though some speakers 
insisted a university police training course should be 
required. 

Chief Dullea insisted that the residential requirements 

Phone 2256 No Job Too Large - No Job Too Small 

We are keeping in date with the New Lacquers and Synthetic Enamels 

CHAS. BONDIETT 

AUTO PAINTING - BODY and FENDER WORK 

532 CAROLINA STREET VALLEJO, CALIF. 



( 



Phone 2-1622 



Warehouse No. 22 



Miss A. Chaffee 



California Sample Furniture Co. 



420 FOURTH STREET 



VALLEJO. CALIF. 



Branch Office: 509 GEORGIA STREET 



Ph. 3-6864 



CLASSIC CLEANERS 



Main Office: 1714 SONOMA STREET — Ph. 3-6865 VALLEJO. CAL. 



Phone 3-5265 



Albert McCann 



McC ANN'S 

JEWELERS 



624 MARIN STREET 



VALLEJO, CALIF. 



Phone 39928 Charlie Underhill, Owner Emmett Terrell, Mgr. '^^ Feature Good Coffee 



Service With A Smile 



ASTOR HOUSE 



where Old Friends Meet 

DINNER SUPREME - COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

LADIES INVITED 

144 VIRGINIA STREET 



SHAMROCK CAFE 

Good All-American Foods - Steaks, Chops, Lunches to Go 

WE NEVER CLOSE 



VALLEJO, CALIF. 134 GEORGIA STREET 



VALLEJO, CALIF. 



April. 194S 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 27 



of five years, as followed by San Francisco in selecting 
its policemen, should be universal and while he admitted 
there were some who disagreed with him, declared he 
would insist that the five years resident feature be con- 
tinued in his city. He pointed out that 29 years was the 
maximum age a man could enter the San Francisco Police 
Department, he said he believed that age could be re- 
duced with the result that younger men in better physical 
condition would be sworn in to preserve the peace of a 
community. 

Chief Tracy stated Oakland had the five-year residential 
clause, and the maximum age was 30 and a high school 
education was necessary to get on his force. 

He said he believed in a statewide police school sys- 
tem, and was in favor of removing the residential re- 
strictions and lowering the age limit so men graduating 
from these schools and colleges could qualify. 

Chief Holstrom said that what the police officers of 
California should do was to improve public relations. He 
pointed out as an illustration of his remarks, the history 
of the FBI. How in 1920 it was a very weak organiza- 
tion, and when John E. Hoover was appointed director 
about that time. He took the job with the understanding 
that no politics should enter the Bureau, and getting that 
assurance, started on the campaign for crime suppression 
until he had such a following that when Congress in 1938 
indicated it would cut down appropriations for the Bu- 
reau the press and public set up such a protest that he 
got what he wanted. By selecting high class personnel, 
properly training them and then getting results that have 
never been equalled in the history of this country. Direc- 
tor Hoover has given peace officers a fine example of what 
can be done for their line of endeavor. 

As for what should be done in professionalizing police 
work he referred his audience to the annual report of the 
last convention of the lACP, which devotes considerable 
space to the subject. 

Chief Wood said that the three recognized professions 
of medicine, law and church have placed a high standard 
for those who would follow those callings. Principal of 
this standard is the educational feature necessary to be- 
come a lawyer, doctor or preacher, which calls for a col- 
lege degree. In his resume of what should be done for 
standardization he gave as an idea, the following: 

A degree from a college police training course, age 



Phone 3-9732 



TOM CHAPELEAS' 



NAVAL BASE CAFE 



147 GEORGIA STREET 



VALLEJO, CALIF. 



Phone Vallejo 3-9857 



NAVY CAFE 



WHERE GOOD FRIENDS MEET 



207 GEORGIA STREET 



VALLEJO, CALIF. 



608 MARIN STREET 



Phone 3-6438 



VALLEJO, CALIF. 



MEYERS JEWELERS 

"The House of Perfect Diamonds" 
Isadora Meyer, President 



I 129 FIRST STREET 



Phone 492 



NAPA, CALIF. 



Phone 3-6353 



"Bob" Scalabrino 



JOHN'S PL ACE 

FOR THE BEST THE MARKET PROVIDES 

518 SANTA CLARA STREET VALLEJO, CALIF. 



Phone 2-1552 



Chas. J. Custock, Owner 



CUSTOCK'S RESTAURANT 



306 GEORGIA STREET 



VALLEJO, CALIF. 



Pho 



94 



Milo Passalacqua, Prop. Res. Phone 242 

TOWING — ANYTIME, ANYWHERE 



BENICIA- VALLEJO STAGE LINE 
and BENICIA GARAGE 

Authorized Dealers for Standard Products, Firestone Tires, 

Philco and Emerson Radios and Willard Batteries 

Auto Repairs and Accessories 



FIRST and F STREETS 



BENICIA. CALIF. 



Phone 3-8708 



Bert Hussey, Prop. 



Phone Benicia 289 



HUSSEY BROS. 

MOVING and STORAGE - PACKING - SHIPPING 

709 KENTUCKY STREET VALLEJO. CALIF. 



Phone 3-8135 



W. W. Mason 



MANUEL'S PLACE 

Sportsmen's Headquarters 
714 FIRST STREET BENICIA. CALIF. 

Electrical Contractors - Motor Maintenance and Repair 



BEDFORD'S FURNITURE EXCHANGE 



92 1 MARIN STREET 



VALLEJO, CALIF. 



Bring Your Electrical Problems to Us - "Bud" 

Motor Winding - Appliances 
148 STANDARD AVENUE POINT RICHMOND. CALIF. 



Page 28 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 1945 



21 to 30 and minimum height 5-9, and that he has a clean 
record — never having been convicted of any criminal of' 
fense. 

He also referred to the success of the FBI and stressed 
the high educational requirement to become an agent for 
that organization. 

Chief Farrell said the peace officers should agree upon 
a plan to raise the standards and then present it to the 
legislature so it would become a starewide law. He told 
of the handicaps of the smaller cities who could not 
have special bureaus to handle various crimes, the police 
of these smaller communities had to be able to work on all 
sorts of criminal cases. Then, too, he was against the 
five year residential requirement as he said it cut down 
the number of men eligible for a police job. 

Director Curley said what men entering police work 
wanted was good salaries, security and a rotating system 
that would give young men a chance of advancement 
and assurance that they would not have to work from 
15 to 20 years before they got a day job. 

He said the way to get these things was by building up 
good public relations, and gave as an illustration of what 
this can accomplish, the case of the Los Angeles Police 
Department. Curley declared Los Angeles police have 
the best conditions of any department in the United 
States. Through good public relations they have gotten 
every influential association and organization behind them 
and as a result they have a 44-hour week, and are work- 
ing for a 40-hour week which, he said will probably be 
adopted. That at the end of five years patrolmen get $259 
a month, the Chief, after five years service, gets $1035 per 
month. All ofiicers with up to 10 years service gets 15 
days vacation, from 10 to 20 years 20 days, and over 20 
years 30 days vacation on pay. 

A motion was made to appoint a committee to prepare 
plans in accordance with the raising of standards, but 
President Zink said this was a preliminary meeting on 
the subject, that it would be handled more at future meet- 
ings, and on a vote it was decided to wait until all the 
returns are in before a committee is selected to go to work 
on the important subject. 

The meeting adjourned with President Zink thanking 
Chief Farrell for the fine meeting place he had provided 
and said the next meeting place will be announced later. 

Guests who signed place cards at the luncheon table 
were: 

San Francisco — Chief Charles W. Dullea, Captain of 
Inspectors Bernard J. McDonald, Director James English, 
Director George Hippely, Captain John A. Engles, In- 
spector John Schilling, Inspector Robert Sullivan, Sheriff 
Daniel C. Murphy, District Attorney Edmond G. Brown 
and Deputy Andrew J. Eyman, Father Raymond T. Feely 
University of San Francisco, Dan O'Connell, War Ship- 
ping Board, J. L. Creighton, Chief Special Agent Stand- 
ard Oil Co., William F. Schoppe, and Jimmie Britt of 
National Auto Theft Bureau, Chief Joseph OTerrall, 
State Narcotic Division, John F, McKeon, Dan Danziger, 
H. S. Lowe, Royal E. Handlos and Joseph A. Murphy of 
Civil Defense, Chief W. A. Merill, U. S. Secret Service, 



R. W. Artis, District Supervisor U. S. Bureau of Nar- 
cotics, Chief Special Agent Douglas Hayden and Special 
Agent Charles Moore, of Pacific Telephone and Tele- 
graph Co., Fred Murphy, Fire Department, Captain A. J. 
Ford, California Highway Patrol, Ensign R. L. Knowles 
Coast Guard, W. H. Shaw, FBI, Royal Atherton, Special 
Agent Standard Oil Co. 

Retired Postal Inspectors George H. Austin and Robt. 
Morse, Postal Inspector William Madeira, Lloyd V. Cos- 
grove, Al Helgoa, Chief Special Agent Hawaiian S.S. 
Company, Herbert Schroeder, A. J. Kane, Kane Detective 
Agency, John J. Burke, Albert A. Rhine, Fred Barker 
of I. Magnin U Co., Milton Pilhashy, Philip E. Geauque, 
secretary Footprint Assn., Lt.-Col. J. R. Barker, Opie L. 
Warner. 

Oakland — Robert Tracy, Captain of Inspector District 

Phone Richmond 6182 

COUNTRY INN 

JOHNNY PETRIC 



SAN PABLO 



CALIFORNIA 



Ken Clark, Prop. 



BLACK & WHITE CAFE 

HOME OF SCRUMPTIOUS HAMBURGERS 



2425 SAN PABLO 



TOWN OF SAN PABLO, CALIF. 



EASTLAND BAKERY 

THE BEST OF BAKERY GOODS OF ALL KINDS 
BREAD - CAKE - BUNS - ROLLS - COOKIES - LAYER CAKES 

MILL V.ALLEY, CALIFORNIA 

Tel. Mill Valley M2 Tel. San Anselmo 2850 

"BAKERS FOR HER MAJESTY— THE HOUSEWIFE" 

With Two Locations 

Locust Bakery - Mrs. Toth's Pastry 



363 MILLER AVE. 
MILL VALLEY, CALIF. 



71 BROADWAY 
FAIRFAX, CALIF. 



Mr. and Mrs. S. W. Toth, Props. 



Phone Mill Valley 1730 

STEAK HUT COFFEE SHOP 

MEALS — FRIED CHICKEN— STEAKS A SPECIALTY 

Prices Right — Open to 2 A. M. 

Also Service Station and Grocery Store 



THE MILL VALLEY BANK 

THE BANK OF FRIENDLY SERVICE 

MILL VALLEY, CALIF. 



April, 1945 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 29 



Attorney's Office, H. E. Radbruch, Captain J. R. Franch, 
CHP, Lieutenant Commander John Barry Kelly, Senior 
Shore Patrol Officer, Deputy Sheriff John A. Greening, 
C. B. McMurphy, radio technician of Sheriff's office, 
Chief Jailer William D. Terry, Chief Harry J. Kelly and 
Thomas Keating, Moore Dry Dock Co., Captain Rufus 
G. King, Lieutenant Wiley A. Hartsfield. 

Palo Alto — Chief Zink, Lieutenant Elmer E. Dakin, 
Sergeant R. D. Fletcher and Officer Grady Fritz. 

Burlingame — Chief R. C. Theuer, Mayor Peter Dahl, 
Councilmen Allan Hunt, Herbert Harris and Leon Whit- 
sell, Former Chief John J. Harper, Theo, M. Lilienthal. 

San Jose — Undersheriff Tom Graham, Sergeant D. O. 
DeMers, Sergeant J. M. Carter. 

Sacramento — Chief E. Raymond Cato, Assistant At- 
torney General Jess Hession, Bob Powers, State Depart- 
ment of Justice. 

Berkeley— Chief J. D. Holstrom, Officer Walter J. 
Johnson, Assistant District Attorney Julian M. Thomas. 

Santa Rosa — Chief Melvin F. Flohr, District Attor- 
ney Charles J. McGoldick, Undersheriff Tom Mooney 
and Chief Criminal Deputy W. E. Cook, Jr. 

San Rafael— Sheriff Walter B. Sellmer, Chief Frank 
Kelly, Officer Amos Foster and Councilman W. C. 
Herup. 

Los Gatos — Chief R. M. Phillips, Marc Jertin, Judge 
A. H. Bell. Constable E. O. Woods, W. D. E. de Froud. 

Sausalito — Chief James F. Doyle, Sergeant Frank B. 
French, Councilman Randolph Chettisen, Ex-Officer Fred 
Perry, Sr. 

San Mateo — Chief Robert O'Brien, City Treasurer C. 
A. Ginnever, Frank Ferrea. 

Redwood City — Chief C, L. Collins, Chief Deputy 
Sheriff Walter Moore, City Councilman G. W. Mc- 
Nulty. 

Atherton — Chief John E. Farrell, Officer Leroy Hub- 
bard, Judge Rowland R. King. 

San Carlos — Chief Edward J. Wheeler, Police Com- 
missioner E. R. Burton, City Councilman John H. Kemp, 
Jr., John A. Cost, agent San Mateo County for FBI. 

San Bruno — Chief William L. Maher, Police Commis- 
sioner Carl W. Huttberg. 

Piedmont — Chief William V. Pflaum, Inspector Geo. 
W. Hanson. 

Alameda — Inspector Floyd E. Drake, former Mayor 
Wm. F. Murray. 

Emeryville — Chief Louis Mann and Assistant Chief 
Frank Farina. 

Sebastopol — Chief E. J. Foster. City Attorney G. W. 
Libby. 

Larkspur — Judge John R. Flohr. 

South San Francisco — W. M. Tener, United Air Lines. 

Martine; — Sheriff John A. Miller. 

Hillsborough — Chief Walter J. Wisnom. 

Hayward— Captain L. A. Like, CHP. 

Napa — Captain James B. Critchley, CHP. 

Evanston, 111. — John E. Curley, Field Representative 
Safety Division, International Chiefs of Police. 



SAN ANSELMO GARBAGE CO. 



35 MERCED AVENUE, SAN ANSELMO. CALIF. 



Phone 1390 



BRUNNER'S TAILOR 

CLEANING AND DYEING — HATS BLOCKED 

Good Work and Service 



n09 FOURTH STREET 



SAN RAFAEL, CALIF. 



Phone San Rafael 12 16 

Gastoni's Restaurant - Cocktail Lounge 

FEATURING MOM GASTONI'S ITALIAN DINNERS 

5 to 9 P. M. Daily Except Thursdays 

Sundays and Holidays, 2 to 9 P. M. 

We Cater to Parties-Banquets 



330 "B" STREET 



SAN RAFAEL, CALIF. 



FAIRFAX LUMBER COMPANY 



FAIRFAX, CALIFORNIA 



Phone San Rafael 47 10 



Kelly Springfield Tires 



KILBORN'S TIRE SERVICE 



TIRE RECAPPING and REPAIRING 



823 FOURTH STREET 



SAN RAFAEL. CALIF. 



San Rafael 1655 



THE TOP HAT 



THE GAYEST SPOT 



819 FOURTH STREET 



SAN RAFAEL, Calif. 



Phone San Anselmo 2072 



Residence 2223 



ROOFING SERVICE 8c SUPPLY CO. 



201 RED HILL AVE., SAN RAFAEL-SAN ANSELMO HIGHWAY 
SAN ANSELMO, CALIF. 



Phone San Anselmo 4600-4601 



County- Wide Service 



ERNEST ONGARO PLUMBING 

SHEET METAL, HEATING, HOME APPLIANCES 
Complete Stock of Plumbing Supplies and Fixtures 



243 SAN ANSELMO AVENUE 



SAN ANSELMO. CALIF. 



Page iO 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 1945 



Nation's Police Launch Brake Check Program 



To save passenger cars from the scrap heap, to main- 
tain adequate transportation for war workers and to 
reduce traffic accidents, the nation's police are making 
final plans to conduct a brake check program in every 
state. 

The program, sponsored by the International Associa- 
tion of Chiefs of Police, will start April 15 and end June 
1. More than 5,000 chiefs of police and sheriffs will 
participate. 

AVith the supply of passenger cars dwindling at an 
alarming rate, and with cars today nearly twice as old 
on the average as in pre-war times, it is expected the 
brake check program will accomplish a great deal in 
conserving cars and reducing accidents. 

Records show that the war effort has suffered serious 
interference by reason of deaths and injuries to war 
workers on the roads and streets. In 1943 more than 
half of the 824,000 injured and killed were workers. 
And last year, it is estimated, some 250,000 cars were 
scrapped after they were damaged beyond repair in ac- 
cidents. 

The brake check was selected by the Association as a 
device for focusing public attention on the seriousness of 
the car and accident situations. The program was 
worked out in such a way that it will not replace routine 
police work, but rather will supplement it. 

A program similar to the one to be conducted nation- 
ally was applied last year in Michigan. In that state, 
accidents had been increasing for seven consecutive 
months. The first month of the program, fatalities were 
less, as compared with the same month of the previous 
year, by 33 per cent. In the second month, they were 
fewer by 31 per cent, and in the third month, when the 
program was inoperative, there was a carry-over reduc- 
tion of 16 per cent. Deaths in the three months were 
less than for the same period of 1945 by more than 100. 

That the check caused motorists in general to give 
better care to their cars is shown by the fact that when 
the program started, one of every seven cars failed to 
meet brake check requirements; when the program ended, 
only one of 23 cars failed to meet requirements. 

The brake check program co\ers passenger cars only 
which are involved in traffic violations in which the car 
is moving, and cars iinolved in accidents. In addition, 
police officers will check the brakes of cars operated in a 
manner indicating inadequate brakes. 

When the officer has stopped a car for a moving vio- 
lation, he asks the driver to vacate the driver's seat. The 
officer then opens the car dooi on the driving side ; leaves 



CATHAY HOUSE 



CALIFORNIA at GRANT AVENUE 



SAN FRANCISCO 



it open while he performs the simple act of depressing the 
brake pedal with the toe of his right shoe. In this manner, 
he determines the distance between the pedal and the 
floorboard when the brakes begin to grip. 

If the pedal depresses to within one inch or less of the 
floor board before the brakes begin to grip or take hold, 
the brakes are inadequate and need immediate attention. 

The most convenient way of determining the distance 
of one inch is to place a piece of wood one inch thick on 
the floorboard under the pedal. If the pedal strikes the 
piece of wood before the brakes take hold, the car fails 
to pass the check. 

If the brakes grip while the pedal is slightly more than 
one inch from the floorboard, they are not to be consid- 
ered safe, and the driver should be urged to have correc- 
tive measures taken. 

If the brakes take hold while the pedal is subsantially 
higher than one inch from the floorboard, the brake check 
will ha\e been passed, but the officer should not in any 
case inform the driver that he has safe brakes. His brakes 
have merely met the check conditions. 

AVhen one inch or less of distance exists between pedal 
and floorboard when brakes begin to grip, the brakes 
actually hits the floorboard before enough pressure can 
be built up to make the lining grip the brake drums hard 
enough to stop the car safely in emergency situations. 

The average car requires about 130 pounds of pedal 
pressure to permit brakes to do a maximum job. With 
only one inch of effective distance left, it is possible to 
build up only about 50 pounds of pedal pressure. 

When less than one inch of distance is left, about 60 
feet will be required to stop a car at 20 miles per hour. 
This is twice the maximum distance allowed by most state 
laws for stopping a car. 

If a car passes the brake check, it does not follow that 
the brakes are safe. It means the brakes have merely met 
the check requirements. 

If the brakes fail to pass the check, the officer will in- 
form the driver of the necessity for immediate attention, 
or take such enforcement steps as are required by the 

Compliments of 

EDWARD BROWN & SONS 

Pacific Coast Insurance General Agents 

432 CALIFORNIA STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Phones: UNderhill 4310-4311 Hubert J, Traynor. Mgr. 

OCEAN SHORE IRON WORKS 

Manufacturers of Tanks, Breechings, Smoke Stacks, Boilers, General 
Plate Steel Work - Water Filters - Softeners 

Dealers in Boilers, Pumps, Tanks, Etc. - Oxy-Acetylene Cutting 
Certified Welding 

SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO REPAIR WORK 

550-558 8th ST.. bet. Bryant and Brannan Sts., SAN FRANCISCO 



April, 1945 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



Page il 



policj' of the police department or sheriff's office con- 
cerned. 

The one-inch brake check is not a test since it does not 
test the brakes. When it is desired actually to tesf the 
brakes, a decelerometer or some other test legally rec- 
ognized in a particular state should be used. The pro- 
gram, however, concerns itself only with the one-inch 
brake check. 

A good clue is presented by compulsory car inspections. 
In New Jersey last year, about 15 per cent of all cars 
inspected were rejected because of bad brakes. In New 
Hampshire brake rejections totalled 19.5 per cent. These 
figures are regarded as indicative of the situation through- 
out the country. 

While the program centers around brakes, the police 
will urge motorists to give their cars the utmost care 
with stress placed not only on brakes, but on steering 
gear, tires, windshield wipers, and other parts having to 
do with driving safety. 

While this is a police program, to be entirely effective 
it must have public acceptance and support. So far, the 
program has been enthusiastically received by many na- 
tional organizations. 

Referring to the vital importance of highway trans- 
portation. President Roosevelt had urged the police chiefs 
association to mobolize "for a concerted attack on this 
fearful threat (traffic accidents) to our people and to 
our war efifort." 

Among the organizations supporting the program are 
the Office of Defense Transportation, U. S. Army Serv- 
ice Forces, the Office of War Information, the American 
Association of Motor Vehicle Administrators, the Amer- 
ican Association of State Highway Officials, the Highway 
Traffic Advisory Committee to the AVar Department, 
the L^. S. Conference of Mayors, the Council of State 
Governments, the National Safety Council, the Automo- 
tive Safety Foundation, the National Conservation Bu- 
reau, the American Automobile Association, and the 
National Post-^^'ar Traffic Safety Committee, composed 
of 48 national organizations interested in safety. Alto- 
gether, nearly one-hundred groups will support the pro- 
gram. 

Heading the program are Brigadier General D. C. 
Draper, president of the International Association of 
Chiefs of Police ; Edward J. Kelly, executive secretary ; 
Edward J. Hickey, general chairman of the State and 
Provincial Section ; and Robert E. Raleigh, acting direc- 
tor of the Safety Division. Mr. Raleigh is in active 
charge of the program from the Safety Division head- 
quarters in Evanston, Illinois. 

Phone SKyline 35 15 

GILLON LUMBER COMPANY 

WE SELL: Bricks - Builders Hardware - Carpenter Tools - Cement - 
Clothes Lines - Doors - Electrical Supplies - Fence Lumber - Garden 
Hose - Garden Lath and Lattice - Garden Stakes - Garden Tools - 
Gravel - Insulation Boards - Ironing Boards - Knotty Pine - Lawn 
Fencing - Lawn Mowers - Lumber of All Kinds • Masonite - Medi- 
cine Cabinets - Nails - Pickets - Ping Pong Tables - Plaster - Plas- 
terboard - Plumbing Supplies ■ Ply\vood - Poultry Netting - Roofing 
Materials - Rope - Sand - Sherwin-Williams Paints ■ Tile Boards - 
Trellisses - Veneer Panels - Weather Stripping - Window Glass ■ 

Window Screens ■ Windows 
GEARY at FOURTH AVENUE SAN FRANCISCO 



SCOTTY'S PONY MARKETS 

U. S. Government-Inspected Horse Meat for Human Consumption 

Five Convenient Stores — 607 Washington, 3329 Lakeshore and 5914 

MacArthur. Oakland; 3 171 College, Berk.; 8th & Barrett. Richmond 



CARNATION COMPANY 



FRESH MILK AND ICE CREAM 



14th and DIVISION 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



When in Oakland 



VISIT 

Olympic Hotel 8C Cocktail Lounge 

MR. & MRS. PAT BL'CKMAN, Proprietors 



EAST 12th at 2nd AVENUE 
2 Blocks from Lake Merritt 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



BUY WAR BONDS 
AND STAMPS 



Compliments of 



FOX WEST COAST THEATRE 



VALLEJO 



CALIFORNIA 



PET HOSPITAL 



1000 NAPA ROAD 



VALLEJO. CALIF. 



Phone 3-8866 



VERA'S LUNCH 

HOME-COOKED MEALS 
Hours 6 .\.M. to 10 P.M. 



1701 N.APA ROAD 



VALLEJO. CALIF. 



CHESTER'S CREAMERY 

MILK SHAKES - ICE CREAM 
Good Food and Service 



FAIRFIELD 



CALIFORNIA 



Page n POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL April. 1945 

Chief Harper of Burlingame Retires 

John J. Harper, for over 21 years Chief of Police of sociation and during his membership he has been an active 
Burlingame, has taken his pension and he turned over and earnest worker, holding the highest offices in most 



to his successor, Chief Rudolph C. (Jack) Theuer, a 
Police Department which has grown up and become a 
most efficient force for the protection of lives and prop- 
erty under the retiring police head. 




Former Chief John Harper 

Jack Harper hails from San Francisco, and for 15 
years before he took the job as Burlingame's Chief of 
Police was a member of the San Francisco Police De- 
partment. As such he served during the days before any 
automotive equipment or radios were used in the sup- 
pression of crime and the preservation of the peace. You 
had to depend on a handy pair of hands, backs with plenty 
of intestinal fortitude to get along and be able to report 
on each day's succeeding roll call. But he did right well 
for himself. He was a member of the first traffic squad 
formed under the direction of the late Captain Duncan 
Matheson and he wound up his bit with the S. F. Police 
Department in the Bureau of Identification. He was 
pensioned from the service for injuries received in the 
line of duty. 

As Chief of the Rurh'ngame Police Department he took 
over with a small force and as the city grew in population 
and importance as a mighty fine residential section of the 
Peninsula he kept abreast of the growtb, and bringing 
into play the experience he gained with the San Francisco 
Police Department, he gave the people of Burlingame 
as fine police protection as could be found in any other 
city in these L^nited States. 

He saw his Department was furnished with the proper 
number of automobiles for police work, he was among 
the pioneers in the use of radio in operating the Depart- 
ment — both one-way and two-way, and he ended up his 
long term of honorable and efficient service by having 
erected a mighty fine police headquarters. He was an 
earnest student of all phases that has marked the prog- 
ress of law enforcement; was a member of the Interna- 
tinnal Association of Chiefs of Police, the State Associa- 
tion of Peace Officers of California, the Bay Counties' 
Peace (Officers Association and the Peninsula Police As- 



of them. 

He was admitted to the practice of law in 1918 and 
he may see fit to dabble in this profession after he gets 
used to being free from the responsibilities as Chief of 
Police. 

He was a good Chief of Police and he made Burlin- 
game the safe place it is recognized by all, and this writer 
joins with his legion of friends scattered through the 
United States in the sincere wish that he has many years 
ahead of him to enjoy his well-earned retirement. 

COCHRAN & CELLI 

CALIFORNIA'S OLDEST CHEVROLET DEALER 



FIFTH and BROADWAY 
Phone HIghgate 0055 



TWELFTH and HARRISON STREETS 
OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone TWinoaks 2400 



Lee R. Marple. Owner 



CALIFORNIA BONDING AGENCY 

Member Brotherhood of Boilermakers Local 39 



536 I5lh STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



I 



Phone HIghgat? 1927 



DUCHESS SANDWICH COMPANY 



2403-05 GROVE STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone TEmpIebar 9110 

I'LL SEE YOU AT 

CHARLIE'S COCKTAIL LOUNGE 



25 11 TELEGRAPH AVENUE 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



RESTAURANT — Steak House of Distinction — In St. Mark Hotel 

MARIO'S 

MONTEREY ROOM SPANISH LOUNGE— Oakland's Favorite 



TWELFTH and FRANKLIN 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone HIghgate 9154 



Johnny Souza 



SOUZA CLUB 

Most Beautiful Cocktail Lounge in Oakland 



279 12th STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



April, J 945 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL Page 23 

Phone 3-6285 You'll like our Spanish Dishes, Enchiladas, Tortillas, Chili-con-carne 

SONOMA FOOD SHOP MEXICO CITY COFFEE SHOP 

QUALITY GROCERIES and MEATS FOUNTAIN SERVICE 

Grocery Depl. — Al Pigate Meat Dept. — Bill Colquhoun IMPORTED BEERS and WINES 

13 14 SONOMA STREET VALLEJO. CALIF. 2 1 8 MACDONALD AVENUE RICHMOND, CALIF. 

Phone Richmond 2419 MOTION PICTURES Good Beans AH Kinds of Beans Beans to Take Home 

CLUB PABLO THEBEANERY 

r . f TA,.PARM MU**,'""' ""''" ^"''""" BEER . SOFT DRINKS 
Foot of TANFARM HILL 

Out SAN PABLO AVENUE Through SAN PABLO. CALIFORNIA 248 ELEVENTH STREET RICHMOND, CALIF. 

Phone 3-5209 Phone Richmond 1110 

TOM'S PLACE THE HARBOR 

MIXED DRINKS - BEER and WINE Long. North 37°--S6,'-I0" 

Lat. West 122° —21, '-43" 

229 GEORGIA STREET VALLEJO, CALIF. 700 MACDONALD AVENUE RICHMOND. CALIF. 



Phone 3-5209 Phone 5392 

TINY SMOKE SHOP /f^''!'''^," 

Best of Food at Reasonable Prices 

104 GEORGIA STREET VALLEJO. CALIF. 57 WASHINGTON STREET PT. RICHMOND. CALIF. 



Phone 3-8620 Watch and Jewelry Repair Jack T. Bauer Phone 6840 Private Booths For Parties 

GEORGE E. BANGLE COMPANY NEW CHINA 

DIAMOND MERCHANTS and JEWELERS CHOP SUEY CAFE 

Diamonds, Watches, Jewelry - Silverware, Glassware, China Chinese and American Dishes - Orders to Take Home Our Specialty 

424 GEORGIA STREET VALLEJO, CALIF. 232 MACDONALD AVENUE RICHMOND, CALIF. 

Phone 2-0712 Phone Richmond 107 

DR. ROBERT H. JACKSON ROMA HOTEL 

OPTOMETRIST Meals and Dancing 

402 GEORGIA STREET VALLEJO, CALIF. 125 STANDARD AVENUE RICHMOND, CALIF. 
Phone I 14 Earl Green. Prop. 

GREEN'S BENICIA FREE MARKET 

CIGARS and MAGAZINES - SMOKERS SUPPLIES THOS. PANOTES, Owner 

400 GEORGIA STREET VALLEJO, CALIF. BENICIA CALIFORNIA 
Phone 38886 

NORLING'S GARDEN AND PET SHOP ^^j" STREET CAFE 

The Small House With the Menu 

409 VIRGINIA STREET VALLEJO, CALIF. ,,, e,.-r, , e-,-o.-r--^ ^'""''' ^""'"^ '^ Assured 

1 267 SIXTH STREET RICHMOND, CALIF. 

Phone 3-9931 Join the Crowd at ■ 

THE MAYFLOWER CLUB FLORENCE CAFE 

A short stroll from the park - The Neighborhood Lounge 

Mixed Drinks and Cocktails Our Specialty 301 MACDONALD AVENUE RICHMOND CALIF 
335 TENNESSEE STREET VALLEJO. CALIF. 

HART'S PASTRY SHOP TERRACE MARKET 

■ General Store - Meats - Vegetables - Groceries 

710 MARIN STREET VALLEJO, CALIF. 1098 23rd STREET RICHMOND, CALIF. 

Phone 3-9075 

NEW YORK LOAN OFFICE STAR BILLIARDS 

WE LOAN THE MOST POOL - SOFT DRINKS 

200 GEORGIA STREET VALLEJO, CALIF. 406 MACDONALD .AVENUE RICHMOND. CALIF. 

Phone Richmond 2309 Chop Suey and Chow Mein to Take Out 

WASHINGTON CAFE DOT AND DEANS CAFE 

American and Chinese Dishes - Chop Suey Our Specialty Good Meals at Reasonable Prices 

110-114 WASHINGTON AVENUE POINT RICHMOND, CALIF. 405 CUTTING BOULEVARD RICHMOND, CALIF. 



KAY'S CAFE ROSE CAFE 

ANTONE PETTA. Prop. 

Good Meals and Good Service at All Times 
12 STANDARD AVENUE RICHMOND, CALIF. 

. : 610 MACDONALD AVENUE RICHMOND, CALIF. 



Phone 3-7 137 

A. BARDAKOS 



GROCERIES, FRUITS and VEGETABLES NEW DEAL CAFE 

Notions, Cigars and Tobaccos 

553 4th STREET » SO. VALLEJO, CALIF. 132 1 MACDONALD AVENUE RICHMOND, CALIF. 

Phone 77 Geo. Christ, Prop. 

THE TOWN CLUB p. ANDRONI CO.'S MARKET No. 2 

FINE WINES and LIQUORS 

425 FIRST STREET BENICIA, CALIF. '"'"' CUTTING BOULEVARD RICHMOND, CALIF. 



Pdge 34 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 1945 



Phone 3-8559 

K IR K' 5 

LIQUOR and DELICATESSEN 

4I3.4I3A BRANCIFORTE STREET VALLEJO, CALIF. 

WASHINGTON CAFE 



3<'<> FIRST STREET 



BENICIA, CALIF. 



Phone 3-8540 K. P. Warner 

HOME BAKERY 

33 7 VIRGINIA STREET VALLEJO, CALIF. 



Phone 3-6958 



SPINELLFS MARKET 



Groceries, Fruits, Vegetables - Beer, Wine, Liquors - Fresh Meats 

601 LEMON STREET SOUTH VALLEJO. CALIF. 

Phone Richmond 1356 100% Standard Gas and Oils Ed Wendl ^7 „. , j~jT7T' 

' rhone Kichmond Z4d/ 



Phone 3-6879 

PARK-IN MARKET 

Groceries - Fruits - Vegetables - Fresh Meat 
SOLANO AVENUE and 8th STREET VALLEJO. CALIF. 

Pleasant Surroundings 

THE SPOT TAVERN 

WINE - BEER - LIQUOR 

I STANDARD AVENUE PT. RICHMOND, CALIF. 

Phone 3-4266 

VICTOR'S GARAGE 

BUICK and CHEVROLET SPECIALIST 

401 SONOMA STREET VALLEJO. CALIF. 

Phone 3-5266 

SQUARE DEAL LIQUOR STORE 



1901 SONOMA STREET 



VALLEJO, CALIF. 



Drive In 



GRAND GARAGE 

Complete Auto Service - Body and Fender Work 
Battery and Tire Service 

130 STANDARD AVENUE PT. RICHMOND. CALIF. 

Phones: 3 5307; Night, 2-0919 Raymond F. West, Mgr. 

Under New Management . . . You Wreck 'Em - We Fix 'Em 

Acme Body, Fender & Paint Works 

Wrecks Rebuilt - Bake Oven - Auto Painting - Auto Glass Installed 
Welding and Brazing - Free Estimates 

3 18 BENICIA ROAD VALLEJO. CALIF. 

Phone Richmond 114 A Home-owned Store Statewide Buying Power 

CHASSEUR GROCERY 

Groceries, Fruits, Vegetables - Fresh Poultry 

128 STANDARD AVENUE PT. RICHMOND, CALIF. 

Phone 2-2 102 

LYON SERVICE 

LAUNDRY & CLEANERS 

3 12 BENICIA ROAD VALLEJO, CALIF. 

Phone 3-962 I 

JOHN'S FOUNTAIN CAFE 

406 VIRGINIA STREET VALLEJO, CALIF. 

Phone Vallejo 2-12 17 Leon B. Vigneau. Prop. 

VALLEJO FRENCH LAUNDRY CO. 

AH Work Strictly Cash 

3 14 MAIN STREET VALL EJO. CALIF. 

Residence Phone Vallejo 3-3447 Business Phone Vallejo 3-3683 

GEORGE LIMBERES 

SANITARY PRODUCE CO. 

109 VIRGINIA STREET VALL EJO, CALIF. 

Phone 2-i 137 

JOHN NICKLOS 

"BEST FOODS AND MIXED DRINKS IN TOWN" 

PALACE CAFE - 137 GEORGIA STREET VALLEJO. CALIF. 

Phone Vallejo 8-9956 

MILT'S SERVICE 

2 ALAMEDA STREET VALLEJO . CALIF. 

FOR GOOD EATS 
STOP AT 

CARQUINEZ INN 

AT CARQUINEZ BRIDGE TOLL PLAZA 
Phone 3-9861 

PALACE BILLIARDS 

LEO H. RASMUSSEN, Prop. 
423.. GEORGIA STREET VALLEJO. CALIF. 



JACK'S SNACK 

HOT DOGS - SANDWICHES - COCKTAILS 

RICHMOND CALIFORNIA 

COTTON CLUB 

GOOD LIQUOR and GOOD SERVICE 

100 VIRGINIA STREET VALLEJO, CALIF. 

ANCHOR CLUB 

WINE - BEER - LIQUORS 

101 GEORGIA STREET VALLEJO, CALIF. 

SMOKE SHOP 

Cigars - Tobacco and Candies - Soft Drinks 

526 SACRAMENTO STREET VALLEJO, CALIF. 

PERRY GROCERY STORE 



1083 SAN PABLO AVENUE 



RICHMOND, CALIF. 



ROUNDY'S BARBECUE 

Good Meals - Reasonable Prices - Best Foods 

1642 SAN PABLO AVENUE EL CERRITO. CALIF. 



VIC-TOM TAVERN 

MEET THE BOYS 
1591 SAN PABLO AVENUE EL CERRITO, CALIF. 

NORTH STAR CAFE 

BEST PLACE TO EAT 
144 GEORGIA STREET VALLEJO, CALIF. 

VIC'S SHOE SERVICE 

507 GEORGIA STREET VALLEJO. CALIF. 

Harry J. Diller 

VALLEJO GLASS COMPANY 

Distributors Pittsburgh Paints - Glass For All Purposes 

332 TENNESSEE STREET* VALLEJO, CALIF. 

DINKY DOO'S TAVERN 

2008 SONOMA STREET VALLEJO, CALIF. 



April. 1945 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 35 



VALLEJO 

(Continued from page 13) 

moted from the rank of Inspector. Lieutenant Stiltz has 
been put in charge of the Traffic Division. 

Other Lieutenants are Frank Hannigan and Lawrence 
Morris. These, with Captains Forman and Beck, make 
up the commissioned ranks. 

The Inspectors are : Oliver, Ralph Jensen, Dan Horan 
and Arno Goldberg. 

The Sergeants include: George Brazil, James Booras, 
Carl Shurman, Lester Lindbrad, John Coronado, and 
Herman Papenburg. 

Working with the regular Vallejo Police officers are 
44 full-time auxiliary police officers, who are paid a dollar 
an hour, for eight-hour shifts. These special officers 
work the night watches, and there presence on the streets 
of the city has had considerable to do with the small 
amount of robberies and burglaries that have occurred 
in Vallejo in the past year. 

While some cities on this coast may have a let up in 
war work and their populations greatly reduced with the 
end of the war nearing, Vallejo will continue to be a 
center of activity, for the Mare Island Navy Yard will 
have plenty to do in contributing its share to keeping the 
thousands of war vessels in shape. 

It will be a long time until its population is reduced 
to pre-war figures. 



MERITORIOUS SERVICE AWARDS 

(Continued from page 1 1 ) 

Sergeant Elden E. Bearden, Sergeant Henry G. At- 
kinson, Sergeant Henry J. Kiernan, Police Officer John 
A. Schorr, Police Officer Frank G. Gibeau, Police Officer 
James A. Brown, Police Officer Edward W. Naughton, 
Police Officer Frank J. Davis, Police Officer William 
McRae, Police Officer Louis J. Olivier, Police Officer 
Howard J. Ross, Auxiliary Lieut. Ray P. Lawrence (Co. 
E), and Inspector John Sturm, Inspector Raymond F. 
Doherty, Inspector Clifford P. Dunleavy, Assistant In- 
spector John J. McDonnell (Bureau of Inspectors), and 
Sergeant George H. Eggert, Police Officer William J. 
Aylward (Co. G), and Sergeant Walter A. E. Meyer, 
Police Officer Larrie M. Driscoll (Co. F), and Police 
Officer James P. Donohue, Police Officer John W. Du- 
Bose, Police Officer George A. Dawe (Co. D) : Services 
performed on February 25, 1945, in the arrest of Edgar 
Seward on charges of robbery, who had taken refuge on 
the roof of 956 Ellis Street. 

Sergeant Elden E. Bearden, Sergeant Lloyd J. Ken- 
nedi,, Police Officer Thomas Sugrue, Police Officer Her- 
bert H. Smith, Police Officer Howard J. Ross, Police 
Officer James L. Egan Co. E), and Police Officer Clar- 
ence H. Thompson (Co. A) : Services performed on Feb- 
ruary 19, 1945, in the arrest of Jeanne McMahon, Chas. 
Peeples and Raymond Manno, who were discovered bur- 
glarizing Shumates Drug Store, 901 Hyde Street. 

Police Officer Raymond A. Bokelund, Police Officer 
Richard A. Reed (Co. F) : Services performed on Aug. 



LARRY'S COFFEE SHOP 

QUALITY FOOD - GOOD SERVICE 

Meals and Short Orders 

623 MARIN STREET VALLEJO, CALIF. 



FORUM CAFE 

WINE - BEER - LIQUORS 

305 VIRGINIA STREET VALLEJO. CALIF. 

Phone 3-7 128 

PIZANTE MUSIC CO. 

309 VIRGINIA STREET VALLEJO. CALIF. 

Phone 2-0890 

FRANK LOVEGOD COMPANY 

DIAMOND MERCHANTS and JEWELERS 
617 MARIN STREET VALLEJO, CALIF. 

MORAN'S COFFEE SHOP 

We Age and Cut Our Own Meat - Steer Beef Only 

1 1 GEORGIA STREET at Wharf VALLEJO. CALIF. 

CASINO CAFE 

Drop In and Say Hi-Ho 

2 17., GEORGIA STREET VALLEJO, CALIF. 

TONEY'S NAVY MARKET 

FISH - MEAT - POULTRY 

Special Attention Given to All Sea Store Orders 

433 GEORGIA STREET VALLEJO, CALIF. 

CRYSTAL MARKET 

Best Quality Fruits and Vegetables - Reasonable Prices 

6 10 MARIN STREET VALLEJO, CALIF. 

Phone 3-74 73 

SPERO'S PAVLATOL 

All Kinds of Groceries and Ice Cream 

401 PENNSYLVANIA STREET VALLEJO, CALIF. 

PAUL'S CLEANERS 

COHEN & NAPARSTEK, Props. 

312 TENNESSEE STREET VALLEJO. CALIF. 



LOUIS B. HUSSEY 

BUY BONDS 



Phone 3-8477 



TRADE WITH Louis Pappakostas, Own. 



LOUIS NAVY LIQUOR STORE 

LIQUORS - WINE - BEER 

343 TENNESSEE STREET VALLEJO, CALIF. 

SWeetwood 98 78 

ELMHURST CLUB 

■•FAT" WILSON • "BUTCH" JOHNSON 
943 1 EAST 14th STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 

PALM GARDEN 

HARRISON at 1 3th STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Phone HIghgate 9564 H. Michels, Prop. 

HENRY'S OVERLAND BUFFET 

LIQUORS, WINE and BEER 
101 BROADWAY OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Page 36 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 1945 



9, 1944, in the apprehension of Arthur Austin and Har- 
old Doolan on charges of robbery. 

Police Officer Leo H. Ferroggiaro, Police Officer Alan 
A. Rosenbaum (Co. E) : Services performed on Septem- 
ber 20, 1944, in the arrest of 'Wm. L. Smith on charges 
of assault, robber\- and theft of automobile. 

Police Officer Francis P. Harrington, Police Officer 
Matthew C. Duffy (Co. E) : For services performed 
on December 9, 1944, when they discovered a fire in an 
apartment house at 2165 Beach Street and assisted all 
tenants to a place of safety. 

Police Officer AVilliam J. Ayhvard, Auxiliary Officer 
Walter R. Brosamle, Auxiliary Officer Rex Reinhart, 
Auxiliary Officer Niels D. Iverson (Co. I): Services 
performed on June 29, 1944 in the apprehension of Wm. 
J. Shumaker, ex-convict, on charges of burglary. 

Police Officer Vernon Devlin, Police Officer Clifford 
L. ^Valker (Co. K) : Services performed on January 12, 
1945, in the apprehension of three juveniles, on chargej' 
of being in possession of government property, including 
one Colt .45 automatic, which was loaded. 

Police Officer George B. Smith, Police Officer Vernon 
Devlin (Co. K) : Services performed on Jan. 13, 1945, 
in the apprehension of Kenneth P. Scurlock, who was 
discovered b\ the officers in the act of robbing the clerk 
of the Avenue Hotel. 

Police Officer Cornelius J. Rvan, Police Officer Chas. 
J. Maggioncalda, Police Officer Walter P. Brennan, Po- 
lice Officer Charles A. Collins, Police Officer Hawthorne 
P. Holstein (Co. H): Services performed on December 
13, 1944, in the apprehension of two burglars in the vi- 
cinity of 950 Faxon Avenue. 

Police Officer Edward J. Hall, Police Officer Ray- 
mond L. Hogan, Patrol Special Officer James Stephens 
(Co. G): Services performed on February 1, 1944, in 
the arrest of Paul L. Dawson, discovered in the act of 
burglarizing the premises of 4700 Geary Boulevard. 

Patrol Special Officer Thomas B. Wilmeth (Co. A) : 
Services performed on January 15, 1945, in the appre- 
hension of Ralph Bemis, charged with robbery of hotel 
at 352 Taylor Street. 

Police Officer James J. Molinari, Police Officer How- 
ard J. Ross, Police Officer Matthew C. Duffy (Co. E), 
and Police Officer Joseph A. Carew, Police Officer Ed- 
ward J. Huegle (Co. K) : services performed on Oct. 
6, 1944, in the apprehension of Joseph Adams, an ex- 
convict, who had just held up a liquor store at gun point, 
fired a shot at a civilian who pursued him and took refuge 
on the roof of 563 Fulton Street. 

Police Officer Daniel E. Shelley, Police Officer Reno 
A. Piccinini (Co. K), and Inspector William E. Aludd, 
Insjpector Herman Wobcke (Bureau of Inspectors): 
Services performed on November 9, 1944, in the appre- 
hension of Charles Crump on a charge of robbery. In 
effecting the arrest, it became necessary for Officer Shel- 
ley and Inspector Mudd to use their service revolvers 
with the result that the defendant was .shot and wounded. 

Sergeant Raymond E. Freeman, Police Officer Grif- 
fith E. Thompson (Co. I) : Services performed on De- 



Phone TEmplebar 9665 Day and Night Service 

McDANEL'S GARAGE 

STORAC^E . . . TIRES . . . LABOR 

608 15th STREET OAKLAND, CALIF, 

PIRATES' DEN 

ADRIEN CHANQUET 
2 114 BROADWAY OAKLAND. CALIF. 



DEAD END CAFE 



FOOT of 16th STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone KElIog 2-9738 

ACME DOUGHNUT CO. 

"Rings of Deliciousness" 

3301 EAST FOURTEENTH STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 

Phone Piedmont 02 78 Pay Checks Cashed 

DOC. BLOOMHEART'S 



CAFE ir CLUB ROOM 
Mixed Drinks 



3 706 SAN PABLO AVENUE 



EMERYVILLE, CALIF. 



Phone UNderhill DIOI 



Daniel Dee 



DEE ENGINEERING CO. 

FIRE BRICK CONTRACTORS 

I 70 HOOPER STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone DOuglas 9661 



Al Kantrov 



M. Robinson, Mgr. 



ST. FRANCIS LUGGAGE SHOP 

Wardrobe Trunks - Aviation Luggage 

140 PO^X■ELL STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone PRospect 6300 C. L. D'AIbert - AI Malpas 

AMBASSADOR HOTEL 

200 CAR DRIVE-IN GARAGE 

55 MASON at EDDY STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone SUtter 1761 

PACIFIC BRASS FOUNDRY 

OF S.AN FR.ANCISCG 
Brass, Bronze, Aluminum, Everdur and Monel Castings 

25 1-259 SECOND STREET S.AN FRANCISCO 



NEW MISSION TAVERN 

2286 MISSION STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



BOWSER INC 



468 9lh STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALDWELL DRESS MFG. CO. 

For Sale in All Important Bay Area Stores — Ask For Them — 
Boost San Francisco Fay Rolls 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone MArket 1130 

HOME LAUNDRY CO. 

A Particular Laundry for Particular People 

WE HANDLE ALL CLASSES OF LAUNDRY WORK 
3338 SEVENTEENTH STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



200 CLUB 



THIRD and HOWARD STREETS 



SAN FRANCISCO 



cember 26, 1944, in the pursuit and apprehension of 
Jack Love, who was discovered burglarizing the prem- 
ises at 130 Pacheco Street. 



April, 1945 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 37 



Phone GArfield 05 71 

SAMUEL S. PERRY 

World-wide Importations Since 1924 

535 MISSION STREET 



Phones: SUtter 4148: Res., Redwood City 138! 
Compliments of 

A. S. DUTRA 

Dredging, Ditching and Contracting 

SAN FRANCISCO 255 CALIFORNIA STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



General Potato and Onion Distributors, Ltd. 



LINDAUER 8C CO. 



2 16 DRUMM STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 35 OAK GROVE STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone suiter 6651 

VALLEY PRODUCE CO., INC. 

FRUITS and PRODUCE 

238 WASHINGTON STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone GArfield 0835 

DR. WM. W. HOAGLAND 



BLOU-SLIP CO. 

OF CALIFORNIA 
865 MISSION STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Compliments of 

PRESIDENT FOLLIES THEATER 



DENTIST 



908 MARKET STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 60 McALLISTER STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone PRospect 5338 



Gus S. Childress. Manager Phones: UNderhill 8975; Res., ORdway 8817 



L. Piatti 



SNAP-ON TOOLS CORP. 

Manufacturers: SNAP-ON - BLUE-POINT 
Aircraft, Automotive and Industrial Tools 

276 GOLDEN GATE AVENUE SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone HEmlock 6494 

D. H. RHODES & COMPANY 

Manufacturers and Distributors of 
PAINT AND VARNISH PRODUCTS - FLOOR WAX 

Branch Store Main Office 

546 VALENCIA STREET 434 NINTH STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone SUtter 7555 

GEO. E. HONN CO. 



ELITE MACHINE WORKS 



22 7 SEVENTH STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone SUtter 4844 



GEORGE H. JOVICK 



127 MONTGOMERY STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone GArfield 25 75 



Samuel Piatt, General Manager 



Manufacturers' Representatives 



420 MARKET STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone Mission 0236 



LOUIS A. GERNHARDT 



GERNHARDT-STROHMAIER CO. 

STOVES and STOVE REPAIRS 

Refrigerators, Washing Machines, Ironers, Water Heaters, 

Room Heaters, Linoleum 

MISSION STREET, Corner 18th STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



U. S. RUBBER CO. 



UNITED PAPER BOX CO. 

Designers & Manufacturers of Paper Boxes - Folding - Set-up 
Cartons - Mounting - Diecutting - Printing 

450 BRYANT STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone DOuglas 4810 B. G. Rowe 

NATIONAL LOCKSMITH CO. 

An Expert Locksmithing Service 

167 JESSIE STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

M. F. BRANCH. California State Manager 

PEOPLES LIFE INSURANCE CO. 



300 SECOND STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



240 SANSOME STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phones: EXbrook 4557; Res. Fillmore 3704 
DESIGNING REBUILDING 



Charles A. Robertson 
PURCHASING 

ROBERTSON ENGINEERING CO. 

We Locate and Buy For You New and Used Equipment 
Best Suited For Your Job 

325 FREMONT STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



M. 8C S. RESTAURANT 



352 NINTH STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone SUtter 5 74 3 



R. P. Giovannoni 



W. G. Giovannoni 



GIOVANNONI BROTHERS 

Wholesale Produce Dealers 
Specialties; Fancy Potatoes, Onions and Garlic 

286 WASHINGTON STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



CLUB VANDERBILT 

225 MASON STREET SAN FRAN CISCO 

INDEPENDENT LITHOGRAPH CO. 

NATRALITH 
ALABAMA at SIXTEENTH STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone UNderhill 1 160 

THE VIAVI COMPANY 



Phone SUtter 9498 Jack McVeigh, Prop. 

THE CENTER CAFE 

The Best of Everything 
BEER - WINE - LIQUORS and LUNCHES 

50 EMBARCADERO SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone EXbrook 4905 



John Vander Laan 



VANDER LAAN PILING 8C LUMBER CO. 



2 16 PINE STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



FERDINAND P. BASLER 

CONTRACTING 

750 NATOMA STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone MArket 9325 



Meet Tiny Delabar and Mike Trkola 



50 FELL STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



THE PLACE 

OF FINE LIQUORS - GOOD FELLOWSHIP 

198 eth STREET at HOWARD SAN FRANCISCO 



Califashions (Reg.) 



Chas. E. Antho 



T. L. M. O. CLUB 



620 O'FARRELL ST. and 2736 24th ST. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



ANTHONY BROTHERS 

Creators of Original Sportswear in California for wear Everywhere 

1130 HOWARD STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



Page 38 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL April, 1945 



CONTINENTAL BAKING CO. SILVER DOLLAR 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA ^^ ^^^^. sjREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Compliments of Phone SUtter 95 12 G. Benedetti, Prop. 

COMMERCIAL PACIFIC CABLE CO. NEW PISA RESTAURANT 

Cablegrams to Hawaiian Islands and Midway Islands CHOICE ITALIAN FOODS 

22 BATTERY STREET SAN FRANCISCO Private Booths 

1268 GRANT AVENUE SAN FRANCISCO 



EDWARD R. BACON COMPANY '''"'"' °'^'^"='" "'" compliments of 

Construction Equipment ETALO MARKET 

FOLSOM at 17lh STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone EXbrook 666 1 2714 SAN BRUNO AVENUE SAN FRANCISCO 

BERNARD B. STIMMEL P^one EXbrook 3903 

ATTORNEY AT LAW BRANDENBURG 8C CO. 

MILLS TOWER. 220 BUSH STREET SAN FRANCISCO Western Distributors 

EXECUTONE Intercommunicating Systems 

Phones: ATwater 4626; MOntrose 3976 Mission District Properties ^^^ MARKET STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

JOS. DEL SECCO 

CASH FOR YOUR HOME J. C. MOORE CO. 

3435 MISSION STREET SAN FRANCISCO GROCERS 

' 793 MONTEREY BOULEVARD 

3838 24th STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



BUY WAR BONDS 



Phone GArfield 7718 Imported and Domestic Groceries 

AND STAMPS FLORENCE RAVIOLI FACTORY 

Fresh Ravioli, Tagliarini and Tortellini Daily 

14 12 STOCKTON STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



JENISON MACHINERY CO. 



Compliments 



900 TENNESSEE STREET SAN FRANCISCO HIGGINS LUMBER CO. 

Phone EXbrook 0128 qq BAYSHORE BOULEVARD SAN FRANCISCO 

A. M. GILBERT 8C CO. Phone DOu.las 2,9, 

Wholesale 
DIAMONDS - WATCHES - MOUNTINGS - JEWELRY HANCOCK BROS. 

704 MARKET STREET SAN FRANCISCO PRINTERS 

Roll Tickets - Coupon Books - Tickets 

Phone UNderhill 5276 A. Falconetti. Chef and Mgr. 25 JESSIE STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

VENICE CAFE — 

LUNCHES and DINNERS Phones DOuglas 2071-2072 Since 1875 

Ital'an D'nners - Good Food at Reasonable Prices - Private Rooms .^ ^-,.» ■ . ,-, ^.^ . ^-^.^^ ,^ w^ -, ^ 

Will Accommodate 90 People - We Specialize in Banquets and Parties ROMA MACARONI FACTORY 

3074 SIXTEENTH ST.. bH. Mission & Valencia SAN FRANCISCO 



Vegetable Macaroni "A Health Food" 



Phone ORdway 5246 G. Tofanelli FRANCISCO STREET and GRANT AVENUE SAN FRANCISCO 

A. ROMEO FISH 8c OYSTER CO. compi.ments of 

Cable Oyster Depot a t a ^r twt*-" t>-. 

1444 POLK STREET SAN FRANCISCO AJAX ENGINEERING CO. 

Compliments of GREEN and SANSOME STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

WILLIAM F. DWYER, M. D. compliments of 

350 POST STREET SAN FRANCISCO ^- ^- O. GOLDEN GATE THEATRE 

Phone GRaystone 7878 William Bud Parr. Owner g^^ FRANCISCO'S GREATEST SHOW VALUE 

GENERAL MUSIC COMPANY 

Distributors 
Buckley Wall Box Music Systems 

IIW POST STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



Compliments of 

ROBERTS AT THE BEACH 



Phone UNderhill 4624 2200 GREAT HIGHWAY SAN FRANCISCO 

T P T'7'M'TV" Q^ f^f^ Phone WEst 7614 Goods Called For and Delivered 

'uniforms ' DIAMOND FRENCH LAUNDRY CO. 

171 GROVE STREET, at Van Ness, Opp. City Hall SAN FRANCISCO Laces & Lace Curtains a Specialty - All Work Guaranteed First Class 

~~ ' 2872-78 CALIFORNIA STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

MORCK BRUSH MANUFACTURING CO. compliments of 

DETTNER'S PRINTING HOUSE INC. 

236 EIGHTH STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

I-KANCISCO 835 HOWARD STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone GArfield 8936 Mrs. C. Espiritu. Mgr. 

BODINSON MANUFACTURING CO. SANMARCOHOTEL 

Rents Reasonable 
2401 BAYSHORE BOULEVARD SAN FRANCISCO 135 1 STOCKTON STREET, near Valiejo SAN FRANCISCO 



April. 1945 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 

San Carlos Police Chief 



Page 39 



San Carlos, prior to the beginning of the present world 
war, was one of the fastest growing little cities on this 
coast, and was increasing in population and building so 
fast that it promised to equal any city in San Mateo 
County. Ideally situated, with the typical Peninsula cli- 
mate it was given its impetus in growth by many com- 



of the so-called major crimes committed there. Not one 
robbery or burglary or any criminal assaults. 

The arrest for traffic law violations have been very few 
and violators of these laws seems to figure it is not a good 
place to break such rules and regulations. 

Few Chiefs of Police are more earnest and sincere in 






B u miwiii ii iMil i iiiiMiUiiBtitliiiiiiiiilMlW ill^^ 




DETAIL OF SAN CARLOS' AUXILIARY POLICE 

Front row. left to right — ^Captain ]ac\ Fairfield, Police Officer Edward Maiilard. Auxiliary mstructor, the late Herman ]ohnson. 
Chief of the Auxiliary, Chief of Police Edward Wheeler, Sergeant James Scnbens. Second row — Fran\ foutsey, William Mc- 
Whinney. Don Drieschamn. Benjamin Daley. M. K. Wight. Bac\ row — E. A. McPhaden. Harry Hunt. R. B. Masters, Ernest 

O/^erlund, and A. ]. Schaffer. 



muters whose work took them to San Francisco. It was 
and is a strictly residential town, no homes for rent, and 
before the war had practically no industry, however, 
possessing a business district that was not excelled by any 
like community in California. 

However, with the war getting into high gear three or 
four manufacturing concerns have selected San Carlos as 
a fine place to continue their work. The latest is the Dalmo- 
Victor Company, of San Francisco, manufacturers of high 
class navy equipment. They have taken over a large 
building on the highway at the south end of the town, and 
are completing improvements that will provide employ- 
ment for many men and women to fill the orders they 
have on hand for the company's products. 

Chief of Police Edward J. Wheeler, who has been the 
only Chief since the town was incorporated, which was 
some 19 years ago, has rendered to the residents of his city, 
totaling over 5500, excellent police protection. 

With a force of four men Chief Wheeler has achieved 
a record for crime suppression that is tops with any city 
of like size. During the past year there hasn't been a single 



their eff^orts to make their community crime free, than 
Chief Wheeler. 

He has taken advantage of the opportunities offered by 
Chief Special Agent Nat Pieper of the FBI to take ad- 
vanced courses in various phases of law enforcement, in 
district classes of instruction. He has had his men take these 
courses in the various classes held in this area. 

Chief Wheeler is a charter member and past president of 
the Peninsula Police Officers' Association, of the Bay 
Counties Peace Officers' Association, and of the State 
Peace Officers" Association, and is not only a member of 
these organizations, but a regular attendant of each and 
all their meetings. 

His duties have become so pressing that he was forced 
last spring to give up the dual job he has held since he was 
Chief of Police, that of also being Chief of the Fire De- 
partment. 

During the war, he, like all Police Department heads, 
formed an Auxiliary Police Force, and the sincerity and 
public-siritedness of the men who rallied to his call has 
been so successful that the Auxiliary Police Force of San 



Page 40 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 1945 



Carlos, totaling some 22 earnest men, will be kept organ- 
ized after the war. These men who enlisted for this work 
of law and order not only went through intensive courses 
of training, as do men entering in the regular poHce work, 
but they bought their own uniforms and equipment. They 
present a very formidable appearance while doing their 
specially assigned duty. They attended all FBI classes, 
and meet once a month at the pistol range for practice on 
marksmanship, and hold monthly meetings for social and 
business purposes. 

Officer E. Mallard who is a photographer of a high order 
has installed a picture galler>' with the Bureau of Identi- 
fication for Chief Wheeler's department and will add much 
to the efficiency of the organization. 

Mayor H. S. Sagchorn, who also is county treasurer 
of San Mateo, is almost as much of a police officer as 
Chief Wheeler, for he takes a lot of interest, not only in 
his town's Department, but meets regularly with the Bay 
Counties' Peace Officers' Association of which he is a 
member. 



Insp. Edward Handley to New Job 

Inspector Edward Handley, assigned to the Pawnshop 
Detail of the Bureau of Inspectors of the San Francisco 
Police Department, has tendered his resignation as a 
Police Officer, and will leave for a new job April l.V 
Inspector Handley will take charge of the Special Detec- 
tive work for Hale Brothers, pioneer department store 
operators. He will have supervision over the five stores, 
located in San Francisco, San Jose, Sacramento, Modesto 
and Fresno, and will have eight operatives on his staff. 

Fifteen years ago Edward Handley joined the Police 
Department, after a successful career as a professional 
base ball player, which saw him on the Los Angeles 
Coast League team in 1919, and in 1921 with the St. 
Louis Cardinals. He played on other major league clubs 
before returning to San Francisco with the decision of 
joining the police force. 

He is a well set up man with plenty of intelligence and 
his work as an officer won him many commendations and 
for some years he was in charge of the Special Service 
Bureau. In this difficult post he displayed exceptional 
ability. On the Pawnshop Detail, under Lieutenant Sam- 
uel Miller, he has worked with such understanding and 
sincerity that he did his part to keep up the splendid 
record this Department has enjoyed for many, many years. 

Lieutenant Handley was a good police officer and he 
will be a valuable man for Hale Brothers, and this writer 
joins with his many friends in and out of the Police De- 
partment in wishing him all the success that will be com- 
ing to him in his new assignment. 



Phone 3-8125 



Open I 1 A. M. to I :30 A. M. 



NEW HOME RESTAURANT 

GOOD FOOD . . . QUICK SERVICE 
High Quality American and Chinese Dishes 

323 VIRGINIA STREET VALLEJO. CALIF. 



REX CAFE 



Musso Brothers 
"THE MAN'S CLUB" 



2 15 GEORGIA STREET 



VALLEJO. CALIF. 



Telephone Richmond 3383 

400 CLUB 

400 MACDONALD AVENUE RICHMOND. CALIF. 
Phone 3-9706 Eugene Garibaldi - Antonio Barone 

VICTORY- V-CORNER 

BEER - WINE - LIQUORS - GOOD EATS 

101 VIRGINIA STREET VALLEJO, CALIF. 
Phone 366 

ANDREW'S LIQUOR STORE 

GOOD BEER - WINES AND LIQUORS 
Quick Service - Free Delivery 

401 GEORGIA STREET VALLEJO, CALIF. 

Phone 407 J. Perrone - A. Mazzucchi 

COLOMBO 

WINES - LIQUOR ■ BEER . . . ITALIAN DINNERS 

Try Our Special Italian Dinner 

102 STANDARD AVENUE POINT RICHMOND. CALIF. 

MICKEY'S COTTAGE CAFE 

Hot Lui 
VALLEJO, CALIF. 



Home Cooking - Beer to Take Home - Hot Lunch 
Soft Drinks 



663 BENICIA ROAD 



RED TOP CAFE 

EATS . . . RECREATION . . . PRICES REASONABLE 

304 MACDONALD AVENUE RICHMOND, CALIF. 

Phone 3-9789 

JACKS 

CAFE AND COCKTAIL BAR 

Finest Drinks in Town 

117 GEORGIA STREET VALLEJO. CALIF. 

Phone 130 

BENICIA FRENCH LAUNDRY 



449 FIRST STREET 



BENICIA, CALIF. 



POOL HALL 

BEER AND SOFT DRINKS 

M04 MACDONALD AVENUE RICHMOND, CALIF. 

Phone Richmond 2484 Joe Kovacevich 

ALVARADO GARDEN 

ITALIAN AND AMERICAN DINNERS 
Liquor - Beer - Wine 

995 SAN PABLO AVENUE RICHMOND, CALIF. 

John Fred 



SPOT CAFE 



COOKING IS OUR BUSINESS 
We Aim to Please 

13 WASHINGTON AVENUE PT, RICHMOND, CALIF. 



LENORA DRESS COMPANY 



MANUFACTURERS 



93 1 MARKET STREET. Room 404 



SAN FRANCISCO 



BON GUSTO CAFE 



CAFE — BAR — COCKTAILS 
All Kinds of Liquors and Good Service 
VIRGINIA STREET \ALLEJO, CALIF. 



April, 1945 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



Page 41 



Phone OLympic 4680 

FOX WATER 



675 37th STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



RAY CHANDLER 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



Phones: Offices, TEmplebar 2990; Residence, TWinoaks 3975 

BRUEHL'S METAL MANUFACTURING 

DIES 



Phone ORdway 1833 



Delivery Free 



FELDHE YM'S 



TOOLS 

615 CASTRO STREET 



STAMPINGS 

OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Fcty. Branches, Philadelphia, Pa., Oakland, Calif., St. Joseph, Mo. 

WHITAKER CABLE CORPORATION 

Formerly Whitaker Battery Supply Company 

General Offices Kansas City. Missouri 
293-295 29th STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 

Phone HIghgate 4010 

J. H. MACPHERSON & STAFF 

OPTOMETRISTS - OPTICIANS 

487 14th STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Phone TEmplebar 3523 



Wines and Liquors - Imported and Domestic 

1449 POLK STREET, near California SAN FRANCISCO 



DENVER BAKING CO. 



608 WEST STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Beauty Parlor Equipment Phone GLencourt 39 13 



STRABLE HARDWARE COMPANY 

Hadwood Lumber - Hardwood Flooring - Panels - Wallboards 
Upson Products - Stratex Building Papers 

FIRST and CLAY STREETS OAKLAND. CALIF. 

Carlo Cotella 



NEWMAN 



Phone HIghgate 1473 



TOOL, DIE and MACHINE WORK 
Designing and Metal Stamping - Contract Manufacturing 

1001 24th STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Phone TEmplebar 46 13 Coleman Shapiro, Mgr. 

UNITED AUTO SUPPLY CO. 

PARTS and ACCESSORIES 

2400 BROADWAY OAKLAND. CALIF. 

Phones: HIghgate 0230: Res., KEllog 2-5303 Warren H. Taylor Phone TWinoaks 2472 



COTELLA B ROS. 

WHOLESALE FRUITS and PRODUCTS 
Steamship, Hospital. Hotel, Restaurant and Club Supplies 

43 1-433 SECOND STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Established 1873 



MILLS SALES COMPANY, LTD. 



Seattle - Tacoma - 
1640 18th STREET 



Automatic Merchandising Machines 

Portland - Los Angeles - San Diego - Las Vegas 
OAKLAND. CALIF. 



B ARR BROS. CO. 

Makers of Needles, Cutlery, Edged Tools, Drop Forgings 

15 SEVENTH STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 

I. C. Unruh, Prop. 

OAKLAND WELDING SUPPLY 

Victor Distributor - Repair Service on All Makes of Equipment 
Acetylene & Electric Rods, Supplies & Equipment, G. E. Arc Welders 

180 TWELFTH STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone GLencourt 4993 



Coats - Gloves Made From Your Deer Skin 



Phon 



Pledn 



-It 4700 



THE HIDE-AWAY 

LEATHER COATS - GLOVES 
Made to Order - Also Repairs and Alterations 

460 ELEVENTH STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 

Phones: LAkehurst 2-4875; TWinoaks 2240 

O. MAZURETTE 

Mazurette Fool-Proof Safety Device for Buzz Planers 

Straight or Tilting Saws, Shapers and Emery Wheels 

A Self-Feed Rip Saw Guard 

576 FIFTH STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 

A. V. La Due, Director of Research 



VAL STROUGH CHEVROLET CO. 

"The Home of Val Strough Value" 
3330 BROADWAY at Piedmont Avenue OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone HIghgate 3963 



E- Labarthe. Mgr. 



HOTE L ST. PAUL 

120 MODERN ROOMS - COMFORT WITH ECONOMY 

534 TWELFTH STREET, at CLAY OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Automotive Publisher Phone HIghgate 92 15 



THE LA DUE TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 

ADVERTISERS BUILDING 
324 THIRTEENTH STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone TEmplebar 62 3 9 



Established 30 Years 



W. L. MITCHENER & CO. 

LICENSED BROKERS 
Hotels, Apartments, Rooming Houses, Real Estate, Insurance 

612 14th STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Phone Piedmont 7221-2 

PACIFIC RADIATOR & FENDER WORKS 



SUNSET TEA & COFFEE CO. 

Roasters, Blenders and Jobbers of High Grade Coffees 

1018 CLAY STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 

Compliments of 

DAHL CHEVROLET CO. 



BROADWAY at 2 7th STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



3540 BROADWA"!' 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



BUY WAR BONDS 
AND STAMPS 



Phone Piedmont 3626 Chas. N. Stark, Prop. 

MONUMENTS 

EAST BAY MEMORIAL CO. 

Monuments, Memorials, Markers 
44 3 5 PIEDMONT .AVE., near Mt. View Cemetery OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Phone GLencourt 0296 

WILSON 

AUTO LAUNDRY — STEAM CLEANING 

32 1 TENTH STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Oakland 



San Francisco 



Sacramento Phone Piedmont 0133 



Formerly Brower Pharmacy 



KUNST BROS. PAINT STORES 



PAINT — WALL PAPER 

GLencourt 5246 



MULLEN'5 

PRESCRIPTION PHARMACY 



544 TWELFTH STREET, Cor. Clay 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



40th and BROADWAY 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone TEmplebar 29 12 Chas. Datridge 

MERRITT HAMMAM BATHS 

TURKISH and RUSSIAN 
Expert Masseurs — Open Day and Night 

Tub or Shower Baths 35c — Bath & Bed $1.00 — Saturdav Niles $1.50 
S. W. COR NINTH and FRANKLIN STREETS OAKLAND, CALIF, 



Phone TEmplebar 9401 



Mary Ariza, Manager 



VrS BEAUTY PARLOR 

All Branches of BEAUTY CULTURE 

EXPERT PERMANENT WAVING 

620 FOURTEENTH STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Page 42 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 1945 



Phone HIghgate 2853 

OAKLAND HEALTH FOOD STORE 

SPLIVALO BROTHERS 

174 1 Telegraph Avenue OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone HIghgate 7757 



F. Anton. Prop. 



OAKLAND UMBRELLA FACTORY 

The Umbrella Hospital - Umbrellas, Handles and Canes 
Repairing and Re-covering - Keys While You Wait. 

1617 SAN PABLO AVENUE OAKLAND. CALIF. 

Phone HIghgate 9345 

PARIS LIQUOR STORE 

FINE WINES - BEER and LIQUORS 

708 14th STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone GLencourt 5 5 04 Floyd Berry 

BERRY'S COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

352 FOURTEENTH STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 

MILLER 8C WARNECKE 



FINANCIAL CENTER BLDG. 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



PACIFIC OXYGEN CO. 



2205 MAGNOLIA STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone TEmplebar 82 13 



Milton Porte, Managing Director Phone ORdway 4230 



PENINSULA SERVICE 



634 I5th STREET 



CLARIDGE HOTEL 

A PERMANENT HOME 
Monthly Rates Only 



HIGH-GRADE FRENCH LAUNDRY 

Bourdet and Castagne. Props. 
LACES AND LACE CURTAINS A SPECIALTY 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 1558 BUSH STREET, Near VAN NESS AVE. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone TEmplebar 4900 

WESTERN-CALIFORNIA FISH CO. 



Phone HEmlock 072 1 



ALEMITE CO. OF NORTHERN CALIF. 



FRESH, SALT and SMOKED FISH 



SECOND and WEBSTER STREETS 



OAKLAND, CALIF. I 170 HOWARD STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Compliments of 



California Motor Express, Ltd. 
California Motor Transport Co., Ltd. 



106 I 22nd STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone TEmplebar 7843 



Antonio Ferro 



BAY CITY BOTTLE SUPPLY CO. 

New and Used Bottles of All Kinds 

Corks, Kegs and Sterilized Wiping Rags 

230 CASTRO STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 

Phone GLencourt 98 70 Fred Schlenker 

MOTOR PARTS COMPANY 

AUTOMOTIVE PARTS 



Phone HEmlock 902 7 Harry Lockhart Jack Lockhart, Jr. 

Meet Your Friends at . . . 

GOLDEN OAK 

choice Liquors - Beers - Wines 

298 VALENCIA STREET, Corner of 14th Street SAN FRANCISCO 



SPEED'S LIQUOR STORE 

GREG HIGUERA . GEO. BENNINGHOFF 



9 12 GEARY STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



HOTELS LOMBARD &. COMMODORE 



2424 WEBSTER STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



Phones: HIghgate 7753 • 7754 



Glass For All Purposes 



THOS. CARTER GLASS CO. 

Art Glass - Mirrors - Glazing - Store Fronts - Desk Tops 

333 NINTH STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 

Phone HIghgate 65 16 Imperial Washable Wallpapers 

Oakland - Berkeley - Alameda - Sacramento - Fruitvale - San Jose 

M. FRIEDMAN PAINT CO., INC. 

MORWEAR PAINTS LAST LONGER 

568 14th STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Phones: GLencourt 1889; Res. HIghgate 6089 S. Hanzel 

HANZEL AUTO BODY WORKS 

Tops - Painting - Towing - Radiators - Fenders 

A COMPLETE COLLISION SERVICE 

23rd and WEBSTER STREETS OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone TEmplebar 1880 



Automotive and Industrial Lacquers Phones: SUtter 1153-4-5 



19th HOLE DE LUXE 

3 107 CLEMENT STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

M. SCHUSSLER & CO. 

Incorporated 

150 POST STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

GOLDEN WEST PLATING WORKS 

60 JUNIPER STREET Since 1896 13 1 MISSION STREET 

Phone UNderhill 6480 Phone EXbrook 6500 

SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

Frantz Track and Hangers 



AIR EQUIPMENT 8C SUPPLY CO. 

De VILBISS Air Compressors and Paint Spray Equipment 

Synthetics - Paints - Master Painter Finishes 

3329 BROADWAY OAKLAND. CALIF. 

CLINE PIANO COMPANY 

Largest Exclusive Piano Dealers in the West 

5iL'^.^,^L"H STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 

2097 MISSION STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone TEmplebar 6505 E. OMalley Prop. 

O'MALLEY'S MUSIC SHOP 

MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS 
Exclusive Agency for Bach Trumpets and Trombones-Buescher and 
King Band Instruments - Ludwig, Lecdy and Slingerland Drums, etc 
1108 FRANKLIN STREET OAKLAND, CALIR 

Phones Office GLencourt 65 10 - Res. HUmboldt 8208 

JAMES H. GILLARD 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 



NUSBAUM WHOLESALE HARDWARE CO. 

Importers - Exporters - Hardware - Houseware 

67 1 FOLSOM STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Angelo Romani 

ITALIAN CAFE 

GOOD DINNERS 
6630 MISSION STREET DALY CITY, CALIF. 

LYONS SERVICE STATION 

BLACK POINT MARIN COUNTY, CALIF. 



Compliments of 

CARL G. HARRIS 



520 Insurance Bldg.. 1404 FRANKLIN ST. 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



32 5 BRANCIFORTE STREET 



VALLEJO. CALIF. 



Af.nl, 1945 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 43 



Motorcycle Headquarters Dedicated 

The new motorcycle headquarters for the San Francisco could be found for them and the Hall of Justice garage 

Police Department has been completed and duly dedi' and entrances were so over-crowded with police auto- 

cated. This new branch of the Department was one of mobiles it was absolutely necessary that one central point 

the changes Captain Charles F. Skelly found necessary should be provided. 

when he took charge of the Traffic Bureau over a year The new quarters are located at 210 Clara Street. At 

ago and which Commissioners Jerd Sullivan, J. Wesley the dedication ceremonies this month those present were 




PART OF S.F.P.D. FEMININE MOTORCYCLE CORPS 
Left to right — Officers Mary O'MdUey. Mary Carr. Betty Bnckhy. Am\ Sieiger, Rita Biirnell. Vera Wendt. ClarHiece. 



Howell and E. L. Turkington and Chief Charles W. 
DuUea saw was provided. They got the money neces- 
sary for the changes and with its completion the more 
than 50 two- wheeled motorcycles and the dozen or so 
three-wheelers, with the men and women assigned to ride 
them have a fine up-to-date quarters. 

Formerly the "bikes" were spotted any where room 



the Police Commissioners, the Chief, and the Captain of 
Traffic. 

Also present were all but two of the young ladies who 
are serving as traffic officers for the duration, appointed last 
June, and who mount the three-wheeled motorcycles. 
They are doing a grand job of enforcing the traffic laws 
throughout the downtown areas. 





CLUB VEE 


WAGON WHEEL 

DINE and DANCE 


333 


SAN PABLO AVENUE EL CERRITO. CALIF. 


329 SAN PABLO AVENUE EL CERRITO. CALIF. 




2 1 CLUB 


BOZO'S 




"Just One Block from Cerrito Theatre" 


COCKTAIL LOUNGE 




GOOD FOOD — 6 P. M. to Closing 


Convenient to Everything 




, EL CERRITO. CALIF. 


17 12 BROADWAY OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Page 44 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April. J 945 



CHIEF ZINK NEW BCPO ASSN. PRESIDENT 
Chief Howard A. Zink, current president of the Bay 
Counties Peace Officers' Association, has been at the 
head of Palo Aho's Pohce Department for over 20 years. 
He joined the force in 1922 and in June 1924 was ap- 
pointed Chief. 

Chief Zink is an able and intelligent police official, and 




Chief H. A. Zink 

he attaches a lot of importance to academic training for 
young men and women who are joining police depart- 
ments. 

He has a studious mind and by applying this talent 
to the work he does in his chosen profession he has work- 
ed out many procedures for the enforcement of law and 
the administration and operation by the men serving 
under him. 

He has seen many members of his pre-war force of 
officers going off to war or entering some essential war 
activity. He has put women in many places left vacant 
by the loss of these men. It may well be said that the 
young ladies who have been given the responsibilities of 
preserving the peace in the college city have come thru 
most creditably. 

During the war years Chief Zink and his officers have 
maintained the splendid record they enjoyed prior to 
hostilities in which his country joined with its many allies, 
by keeping Palo Alto virtually free from all so-called 
major crimes. 

Phone RAndolph 3364 Albert Aldinger 

CAPITOL NURSERY 

GARDENERS' SUPPLIES 

COLMA. CALIF., SAN MATEO COUNT-l' 

SOUTH CITY POOL HALL 



320 GRAND AVENUE 



SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO 



TO WNSEND'S 

. . . Since 1836 . . . 
San Francisco's Famous Confectioners and Restauranteurs 



GOLDEN WEST TAMALE CAFE 

One of California's finer Restaurants — specializing in Italian Dinners, 

Steaks, Chops, Fried Chicken, Tamales, Enchilades. 

Ravioli and Fresh Tagliarini. 

3869 TELEGRAPH AVENUE OAKLAND. CALIF. 

Phone Piedmont 9434 

THE GATE INN 



5696 SAN PABLO AVENUE 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone Piedmont 052 7 Paul Hitter 

MOTOR SERVICE COMPANY 

BUICK REPAIRS 

493 40th STREET at TELEGRAPH AVENUE OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone TWinoaks 1700 



Johnny Lukanish 



MOTOR RADIO SUPPLY CO. 



Learadi( 
2819 BROADWAY 



The Pilot's Preference 

OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone Piedmont 0258 



Al C. Weber 



PARAMOUNT ELECTRIC CO. 

Everything Electrical - Electrical Construction 
Lighting Fixtures - Repair Work 

42 16 TELEGRAPH AVENUE OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Golden West Savings and Loan Association 

AMERICAN EXPRESS TRAVELERS CHEQUES 

1632 FRANKLIN STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 

Phone Hlghgate 8100 

WILLIAM H. HOLLANDER 



ATTORNEY AT LAW 
Bank of America Building 



12 12 BROADWAY 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone Hlghgate 0560 

TRUE BLUE CAFETERIAS 



FINE FOODS 

1714 FRANKLIN STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone HUmboldt 0443 



R. W. Dilley 



METAL REPAIR WORKS 

OAKLAND, CALIF. 



SPECIALTY WELDING 

3 119 MARKET STREET 



Phones: Office GLencourt II 40 - Res. ANdover 6565 

Basil L. Smout Western Casket Company 



3 3 00 BROADWAY 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Ph. TWinoaks 1644 Dress and Surgical Corsets - Artificial Limbs 

C. H. HITTENBERGER, INC. 

MAKERS OF SURGICAL AND ORTHOPEDIC APPLIANCES 
Belts, Trusses, Braces and Arch Supporters 

42 1 NINETEENTH STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Phone OLympic 1944 1945 

MIRAMONTE COMPANY 



3426 TELEGRAPH AVENUE 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone Hlghgate 8001 Architect's and Engineers' Supplies 

EAST BAY BLUE PRINT and SUPPLY CO. 

Authorized Distributor for KEUFFEL & Esser Co. of New 'York 
BLUE PRINTING - PHOTOSTATING 

1723 FRANKLIN STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone HUmboldt 0728 



Al Santoni 



129 GEARY 



SAN FRANCISCO 



22 1 POWELL 



AVENUE AUTO WRECKING 

New and Used Parts - We Buy, Sell or Exchange Cars 

3 120 SAN PABLO AVENUE OAKLAND. CALIF. 

Lawn Mowers Sharpened 

STANDARD SAW WORKS 

General Saw Repair and Grinding Shop - Resaws - Narrow Band 

Saws Brazed, Set and Filed - Circular Saws Gummed, Retoother, 

Swaged and Filed - Band and Circular Saws in Stock 

818-20 FRANKLIN STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone TEmplebar 0856 



April, J 94 5 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 4T 



Phone TUxedo 9705 

HOT SPOT 

ALL KINDS OF COCKTAILS 

79 SIXTH STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone ATwater 4914 

Compliments of 

JACK JOHNSON CO. 

CERTAIN-TEED ROOFING 

3365 ARMY STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone GArfield 56 18 



J. Anson 



L. Nicholson 



LANKERSHIM HOTEL 

FIRE PROOF - 350 ROOMS - MODERATE RATES 

S. R. Riddle, Mgr. 
FIFTH STREET at MARKET SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone GArfield 34 10 

AMCO MANUFACTURING CO. 

AMCO Distinction LINGERIE 

83 7 MISSION STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



JACK MURRAY'S SUNNYSIDE INN 



133 SIXTH STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone sutler 9836 

TONY'S 1 3 7 CLUB 

COCKTAILS 

Let's Get Acquainted . . . Let's Get Gay 

137 THIRD STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



CLIFF SERVICE 

SIGNAL S. S. GAS and OIL 

TENTH & CUTTING BOULEVARD RICHMOND, CALIF. 

29th STREET MARKET 

GROCERIES - MEAT - ICE CREAM 
701 SO. 29th STREET RICHMOND. CALIF. 

BAKERY 

ALL KINDS OF CAKES - BREAD 
Try Us 



101 PARK PLACE 



RICHMOND, CALIF. 



WORKINGMAN'S MARKET 

MEAT - BEER - WINE - GROCERIES 
533 CUTTING BOULEVARD RICHMOND, CALIF. 

UNCLE SAM'S COFFEE SHOP 

LUNCH and SANDWICHES 

What You Get is the Best 

425 CUTTING BOULEVARD RICHMOND, CALIF. 

Phone Richmond 4954-W Auto Painting — Best Work • Reasonable 

Point Richmond Auto Painting Body 
and Fender Shop 

Acetylene Welding - Electric - Specialist in Skilled Body Repairing 

220-224 WEST RICHMOND AVENUE RICHMOND, CALIF. 



FAIRBANKS MORSE CO. 



630 THIRD STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone DOuglas 33 19 
Will F. Heffernan 



Roy J. Cunningham 



B. A. Thomas 



HEFFERNAN INVESTMENT CO. 

Apartment Houses - Hotels - Insurance - Loans 
ROOMS 1401 to 1415 ■ 995 MARKET STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone HUmboldt 1294 M. E. Roze 

MATSON ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT CO. 

INDUSTRIAL - ELECTRICAL - CONSTRUCTION 

3 781 BROADWAY OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Phone TWinoaks 3 800 Chas. F. Dillon 

JOHN FILIPELLI 

BAIL BONDS 
Furnished Day and Night 

520 FIFTEENTH STREET, Opposite City Hall OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone TEmpIebar 4049 



T. C. Schirrmacher. Jr. 



TED'S KEY WORKS 

Repairing of Steel Tapes, Door Checks, Etc. - Tools, Cutlery Ground 

Quick Response to Calls 
1330 WASHINGTON STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 



BEATIE STEEL AND SUPPLY CO., INC. 



32nd and CYPRESS STREETS 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone HIghgate 05 1 5 

JOHN HANSEN 8C SONS 

COFFEE and TEA MERCHANTS 

Since 1894 
FOURTH and CLAY STREETS OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Phone: HIghgate 3 703 - 3 704 W. B. Straub. Pres. and Mgr. 

EMPIRE FOUNDRY CO., INC. 

All Kinds of Foundry Work - Light Castings a Specialty 

Manufacturers of .Mantel Grates. Plumbers' Supplies. Hardware 

429 THIRD STREET OAKL AND. CALIF. 

DR. THOS. H. PETERS 

OPTOMETRIST 

2611 TELEGRAPH AVENUE Phone HIghgate 1474-5 

430 SEVENTH STREET Phone CLencourt 6375 
3534 EAST FOURTEENTH STREET Phone KEIlog 3-6076 

OAKLAND. CALIFORNIA 



RUDY'S PLACE 

Here's! Mud in Your Eye 

222 7 MACDONALD AVENUE RICHMOND, CALIF. 

Phone MArket 4638 

MATHEWS PAINT COMPANY, INC. 

Distributors of PRATT & LAMBERT Products 



1118 MISSION STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone Mission 3604 

OCCIDENTAL PLATING WORKS, INC. 

Alumilite Process - Chromium Plating - Polishing 
Oxidizing - Spraying 

2259 FOLSOM STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone DOuglas 3 890 



S & K SALES COMPANY 

FACTORY DISTRIBUTORS 



450 BRYANT STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



THE ALAMEDA EXCHANGE 



9 MARKET STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone GArfield 9359 

Compliments of 

HURLEY'S GRILL 

2 7 THIRD STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Compliments of 

CASWELL COFFEE CO. 



642 HARRISON STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone UNderhill 3838 

LEROY OLSON CO. 

3070 17th STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

PHOENIX HOSIERY 

AT ALL BETTER STORES 
FOR MEN, WOMEN AND CHILDREN 



Page 46 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 1945 



Phone TWinoaks 2 133 



Phone 153 



NORMAN OGILVIE 8c CO. 



SAUSALITO DRUG CO. 



I 924 BROADWAY 



REALTORS 

RAY BUILDING 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



The REXAL Store 

681 BRIDGEWAY BOULEVARD 



SAUSALITO, CALIF. 



Phone Hlghgale 73 71 



Shop on Wheels 



Phone Sausalito 17! 



BONIN PLUMBING AND HEATING 



Repairing and Jobbing of All Kinds 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Guardian of Quality and Service 



54! 22nd STREET 
Phone TWinoaks 3434 

SENTINEL CHEMICAL COMPANY, INC. 

Special Cleaners and Cleansers - Deordorants - Disinfectants and 
Sterilizers - Insecticides - Polishes - Soaps, Etc. - Waxes 

1790 ELEVENTH STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 



JOE'S GROCERY 

GROCERIES, FRUITS and VEGETABLES 

633 BRIDGEWAY BOULEVARD SAUSALITO. CALIF. 



Pho 



149 



Household Supplies 



Sporting Goods 



MARIN HARDWARE STORE 

HARDWARE, PAINTS, OIL, GLASS, ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES 

664 BRIDGEWAY SAUSALITO, CALIF. 



Ph. GLencourt 9898 Always a Fine Entertainment for Less Money 

NEW SHANGHAI CAFE - TERRACE BOWL 

Largest in East Bay - Three Floor Shows: 7, 9 and 11:00 P. M. 
Drinks 4Qc up. Dinners $1.50 up, Saturday $2, Special Occasions $3 

415 to 429 TENTH ST REET OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Phone Piedmont 1239 Leaders - Gutters and Patent Chimneys 

CITY CORNICE CO., INC. 

Metal Cornices - Tin - Iron and Copper Work - Skylights, Ventilating 
Air Conditioning - Porcelain Enamel Drainboards and Table Tops 

3 12 1 SAN PABLO AVENUE OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone GLencourt 9140 



L. M. Cakebread 



CAKEBREAD'S GARAGE 

AUTOMATIC SERVICE OF ALL KINDS 
Official Brake Station - Body and Fender Repairs 

803 EAST 12th STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Marco Melovich 



Phone 3 1 5 



MARCO'S 



18 EL PORTAL STREET 



SAUSALITO, CALIF. 



Phone 49 



ASSOCIATED STATION No. 159 

SCHRAGE & PIERACCINI 

1001 BRIDGEWAY BOULEVARD SAUSALITO, CALIF. 

1249 CLUB 

WINE - BEER CHILI - GOOD SANDWICHES 

1249 EAST 12th ST REET OAKLAND, CALIF. 

MARIN CITY DRUG STORE 



F. PERRY & SON 



Groceries and Imported Goods - Fruit and Vegetables 
Wines and Liquors 



54 CALEDONIA STREET 



SAUSALITO, CALIF. 



Phone 185 



E. Puharich 



J. M. Parsley 



Sausalito Hardware and Plumbing Co. 

72 1 BRIDGEWAY SAUSALITO, CALIF. 

Phone 700 Al and Ray Montpart 

SAUSALITO CLEANING WORKS 



218 CALEDONIA STREET 



SAUSALITO, CALIF. 



Phone 702 

EL ROY GARAGE 

Machine Work - General Repairing - Towing - Battery Charging 

MILL VALLEY 



Phones: 888-889 

MARIN FRUIT 8C GROCERY CO. 



Fruit, Vegetables and Groceries 
Wines and Liquors 



CALIFORNIA *>05 BRIDGEWAY 



SAUSALITO, CALIF. 



THE BUCKEYE 

DISTINCTIVE DINING ROOM - COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

MILL VALLEY CALIFORNIA 

SNACK SHACK 

Hot Dogs - Chili Beans - Spaghetti - Best of Coffee 
Fountain Drinks - Tobacco - Sandwiches 



Jack Chang Mary Chang 

J. C. FRUIT MARKET 

SEA FOOD - GROCERIES and VEGETABLES 

Delivery Service Except Sunday 
636 BRIDGEWAY SAUSALITO. CALIF. 



Phone Sausalito 343 



Special Tailoring Department 



1917 BRIDGEWAY 



SAUSALITO. CALIF. 



J. C. JACOBS 8C CRUG 

Ladies* and Men's Furnishings, Clothing, Hats and Shoes 

Sole distributors Florsheim Shoes - Official Outfitters Boy Scouts 
690 BRIDGEWAY SAUSALITO, CALIF. 



Phone Belvedere 37 -J 

BARR'S TAXI 

TIBURON CALIFORNIA 

Phone Sausalito 108 

NUNES BROS. 

GENERAL BOAT BUILDING AND REPAIRS 

SECOND and MAIN STREETS SAUSALITO. CALIF. 

LIGHT HOUSE GRILL 

BEST FOOD - REASONABLE PRICES 

1313 BRIDGEWAY SAUSALITO. CALIF. 

LINCOLN GARAGE 

STORAGE and REPAIRS 

559 BRIDGEWAY AVENUE SAUSALITO, CALIF. 



Phone KEllog 2-9925 



T. Joyce, Prop. 



JOYCE'S 

Beer - Wine - Liquor - Sandwiches 



1200 13th AVENUE 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone Sausalito 458 



SAUSALITO FURNITURE STORE 



Furniture - Stoves - Rugs - Etc. 
Linoleum - Radios 



350 CALEDONIA STREET 



SAUSALITO, CALIF. 



Phone HEmlock 73 13 



A. E. Smith and L. O. B. Lindstrom 

ENGINEERS - MANUFACTURERS - AGENTS - DEALERS 
Repair and Renewal Service 

145 ERIE STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

KING PIN DOUGHNUT SHOPS 

1200 EAST Mth STREET SAN LEANDRO, CALIF. 

. . . and . . . 
TELEGRAPH at CHANNING BERKELEY. CALIF. 



April, 1945 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 47 



Hillsborough Well Policed 



Hillsborough with its eight square miles of territory 
and many miles of paved roadways winding over the hills 
and vales past the many palatial homes of the town is 
getting along with two less police officers than preserved 
the peace of the community prior to the war. 

Chief Walter Wisnom, who has served as head of the 
Police Department through this war, has displayed great 




Chief of Police W. J. Wisnom 
of Hilkborough 

ingenuity in giving Hillsborough and its some 3200 
population excellent police service. 

With his men divided into two 8-hour shifts and with 
a stand in watch for the full 24 hours he has met the 
problems of his peninsula city with effectiveness. As is 
generally known, Hillsborough has no business section, 
it being given over exclusively to residential purposes and 
in its confines some of the most pretentious homes are to 
be found. It is an alluring target for the porch climbers 
and window lifters and others with larcenous inclinations. 
These big homes employ many servants and because of 
the demand brought on by the present war for men and 
women in essential industries, the matter of getting de- 
pendable domestic help keeps Chief ^Visnom and his 
men busy in seeing that the class of servants employed 
nowadays don't get itchy fingers. The Police Department 
has cleaned up some jobs pulled by newly-employed 
household workers. 

His radio equipped cars keep a constant patrol of the 
many streets of Hillsborough and have no hesitancy in 
stopping and questioning any stranger who appears after 
late hours on their frequent patrols. 

Hillsborough works in close cooperation with the Po- 
lice Departments of San Mateo, Burlingame, South San 



Francisco, San Francisco, and other peninsula cities and 
towns, all connected by two-way radio. 

Besides Chief Wisnom, the Police Department is made 
up of Sergeant E. D. Funk, Officers E. Lane, George 
Kerrell, Arthur Binder, Robert Greeley, Thomas Steat, 
Quincey Turner, and two special officers, William J. 
Brennan and Charles Paite. In recent months a matron 
has been added to the force in the person of Mrs. Irene 
Farrell. 

Plans are being completed for a new building in the 
civic group, and the Police Department will be given 
headquarters that will include the latest advancements 
in police administration and housing. 

Like all California cities, Hillsborough has its housing 
shortage, and there is quite a turnover in subletting pres- 
ent homes. The navy has taken over two big homes and 
fitted them up for bachelor officers stationed at San Bruno 
and other nearby points. These homes provide lodging for 
50 men, and are filled to capacity at all times. 

Phone S. A. 2680 

Grant's Creamery and Delicatessen 

The Best in Fountain Service and Delicatessen Merchandise 



5 74 SAN ANSELMO AVENUE 



SAN ANSELMO, CALIF. 



Phone S. R. 282 



TRAVELERS INN 



. . . CHOICE WINES AND LIQUORS ... 

Where excellence of meal service, accommodations for Special Par- 
ties, French and Italian Dinners may be found to suit 
the most particular. 
306 THIRD STREET. Corner of Tamalpais SAN RAFAEL. CALIF. 



Phone 3-6413 



5 14 MARIN STREET 



HOTEL SOLANO 

"CENTER OF TOWN" 

VALLEJO. CALIF. 



...BUY BONDS... 

MRS. MARC HAMPTON 

2900 NORTH SAN PABLO AVE. RICHMOND. CALIF. 



Phone 4888 



Neil R. Ross, Host 



. . . BEAUTIFUL . . . 

COURT SAN RAFAEL 

Featured in "LODGING FOR A NIGHT" 

REDWOOD HIGHWAY 101. NORTHERN EDGE OF SAN RAFAEL 

SHIP CAFE 

WINE - BEER - LIQUORS AND SANDWICHES OF ALL KINDS 

1676 NAPA ROAD VALLEJO. CALIF. 

CELIA HOLLAND 

. . . RESTAURANT . . . 
Buttered Hot Cakes and Other Food 

300 CUTTING BLVD. RICHMOND, CALIF. 

BAY TERRACE GROCERY 

BEER - WINE - GROCERIES - VEGETABLES - FRUITS AND 

GOOD MEATS 
603 WELSON AVENUE RICHMOND, CALIF. 

POOL-BEER PARLOR 

PLEASANT SURROUNDINGS AND FUN 

2 10 W. RICHMOND AVENUE RICHMOND. CALIF. 



Page 48 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



April. 194? 



Phone Sausalito 24 



C. D, Thomas, Prop. 



2 A. M. CLUB 



SAUSALITO TAXI SERVICE 

CLOSED CARS - QUICK SERVICE - REASONABLE RATES 



LOCUST STATION 



MILL VALLEY. CALIF. 22 EL PORTAL 



SAUSALITO, CALIF. 



Phone Sausalito 502 



Sam Garofalo. Prop. 



LA VISTA CLUB 

COCKTAILS 
OPPOSITE OLD GOLDEN GATE FERRY SLIP 



MARIN COUNTY PEACE OFFICERS 



MARY BRAZIL 



SAUSALITO 



CALIFORNIA MILL VALLEY 



CALIFORNIA 



Phones: 557-558 



HARRY'S GROCERY 

GROCERIES - FRUITS - VEGETABLES 
BEER AND WINE 



LITCHFIELD CONSTRUCTION CO. 



108 SECOND STREET 



SAUSALITO, CALIF. 



721 FRANCISCO BOULEVARD 



SAN RAFAEL. CALIF. 



JOE DI MAGGIO'S YACHT CLUB 



GREETINGS 

BEVAN'S MOTEL 

OPPOSITE MOORE'S MARVEL MAR 
ANITA and AL BEVAN 



FISHERMANS WHARF 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone UNderhill 8261 



Phone 155 



H. S. WATSON CO. 

Watson Spicer Flexible Shafts 

Watson-Brown Lipe Auxiliary Transmissions 

Brown-Lipe Transmission & Power Take Offs 

Spicer Universal Joints 



MADDEN & LEWIS CO. 

DESIGNERS - BOAT BUILDERS and MARINE WAYS 



1145 HARRISON STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO SAUSALITO 



CALIFORNIA 



HOME F I H A 



y 



When . . . 



Buying a home 
Refinancing a home 
Remodeling a home 
Consult an expert 

The San Francisco Bank, for yj years, has rendered 
home advice to prospective home owners. 



\ 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

SA VINGS Inc. Fti. 10, 1868 ■ Mimhir Pidiral Deposit Ins. Corp. TR UST 

526 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 

SEVEN F P IC ES — EAC H A COMPLETE BANK 



April, 1945 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 49 



POST-WAR POLICE PROBLEMS 

(Continued from page 10) 
when all was said and done, the matter of stamping out 
the evil was the work of the individual Police Depart- 
ments. The sole approach to the problem was a medical 
one; in all of the literature that was distributed the state- 
ments were made that it was not a moral, but a medical 
issue. It was emphasized that the health of the soldier 
and the sailor was the only objective. This philosophy was 
repugnant to the great majority of police officials, but as 
long as the results were accomplished and the houses were 
closed, we did not quarrel with the reasons. 

With the demobilisation of the armed forces there is 
a great danger that public support of the program will 
disappear. No doubt appropriations which were made to 
carry out the control program will be slashed and the 
Federal Agencies which supported the movement will be 
abolished. Once more the police departments will be en- 
tirely responsible for the enforcement of the laws govern- 
ing prostitution and they will be without the public sup- 
port which they have enjoyed during the wartime period. 

Police Chiefs should recognize commercialized vice for 
what it is — a filthy, corrupting racket in which huge 
profits were made by a few pimps, panderers and 
niadames and property owners who derived excessive rents 
by reason of permitting unlawful conditions to operate 
on their premises. It must be reluctantly admitted that 
whenever scandals exposed in police departments and 
in other branches of government, it was found that the 
corrupting influences of commercialized prostitution 
were the causes of the scandal. 

There is every reason to believe that the racketeers 
and gangsters who controlled the prostitution racket be- 
fore the war are also making post-war plans to renew 
their activities. We must resist this movement with 
every resource at our command and enlist the support 
of our decent citizens in the fight to keep this racket 
from again spreading over the country and carrying with 
it disease and corruption. Police Chiefs who take a firm 
stand on this subject will retain their self-respect and 
win the gratitude of the mothers and fathers of the 
Nation. 

Post-war planning for Police Department would not 
be worth considering unless the subject of Crime Pre- 
vention and Juvenile Delinquency occupied a prominent 
place. I hesitate to discuss this subject at any length be- 
cause Chief Inspector John J. O'Connell of the New 
York Police Department, and a recognized expert in this 
field, is heading a panel discussion of this problem at this 
Conference and has prepared an authoritative report and 
recommendations for the benefit of the members of the 
Association. Every member of this panel, without ex- 
Phone TEmplebar 8782 Roy J. Beckett 



BECKETT & FEDERIGHI 



GENERAL CONTRACTORS 



Phone 650 



George Louie, Mgr. 



SAUSALITO HOTEL COFFEE SHOP 

SPECIAL LUNCHEON AND DINNERS 
Featuring American and Chinese Dishes 



20 EL PORTAL STREET 



SAUSALITO. CALIF. 



THE GLIDDEN CO 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone EXbrook 6794 



SYSTEM FREIGHT SERVICE 

SYSTEM - SPEED - SERVICE 
"The Mark of Responsibility" 



5 1 HOWARD STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone YUkon 05 59 



IDENTIFICATION PHOTO SERVICE 

Identification Cards and Badges Sealed in Plastic - Passport and 

Application Photos - Copying and reducing discharges, etc., 

to wallet size and sealing thenra in plastic. 



FERRY BUILDING 



SAN FRANCISCO 



MACNSON'S 

CONTRACTING ENGINEERS 



15 1-161 TEHAMA STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



WILLAT PRODUCTION CO. 



1122-1128 FOLSOM STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phones: TEmplebar 1741 - 1742 



I. F. Schiller. Store Mgr. 



PAY LESS DRUG STORE 

The Store That Sells For Less Every Day in the Week 
Films - Liquors - Tobaccos - Prescriptions - Photo Finishing 



1901 TELEGRAPH AVENUE 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



HAGSTROM'S Friendly Food Stores 

Quality Foods at Lowest Prices is not only a slogan with Hagstrom's 
Stores but a FACT! Whether it is Nationally Famous brands of 
canned goods or meat, dairy products, etc., you'll find a wider selec- 
tion at Consistent Savings if you do ALL of your food buying at 
HAGSTROM'S. 



M4I FRANKLIN STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Page 50 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 1945 



ception. has expressed his ideas to me on the importance 
of this problem and urged that full consideration be given 
to recognizing the fact that Juvenile Delinquency is the 
main problem with which police departments will be 
confronted during the post-war period and that Police 
Chiefs must throw the entire facilities of their Depart- 
ments into the battle against this tide. 

It is urged that the report and recommendations of the 
Committee on Crime Prevention and Juvenile Delin- 
quency be given earnest attention by this membership 
and that we carry away with us a firm resolution to 
dedicate our efforts to wage unrelenting warfare against 
conditions which threaten to destroy our youth. 
XII. Legislation' 

It is recommended that a study be made in conjunc- 
tion with the American Bar Association of the existing 
laws governing the extradition of criminals and the pro- 
duction of material A\itnesses who are seeking to e\ade 
testifying. 

We have every reason to anticipate that criminals 
will avail themselves of every modern device which can 
be used in the commission of crime and for the purpose 
of fleeing from justice. With the development of fast 
aerial transportation, criminals will be able to commit 
a crime in one section of the world and within 24 hours 
be in a foreign country and comparatively free from ar- 
rest and extradition. Clauses in treaties with foreign 
countries which go\ern the extradition of persons charged 
with criminal offenses should be studied with a view of 
increasing the mutual assistance which can be rendered 
in enforcing the criminal statutes and in facilitating the 
return of criminals. 

State Legislatures should enact uniform legislation de- 
signed to secure the attendance of witnesses from without 
their respective states in criminal cases. 

Civilian Defense units which were organized to protect 
our citizens are being disbanded throughout the country. 
In many areas mutual aid programs were developed 
which were to be put in effect in the event of an attack 
by the enemy. Plans were made to dispatch men and 
material from one community to another; drills were 
held simulating actual emergency conditions and a 
smoothly functioning organization was the result of many 
months of intensive training, generally under the direc- 
tion of a law enforcement executive. AH of this trained 
material presents Police Chiefs with an opportunitv to 
enlist them as a Permanent Disaster Corps, organized to 
deal with emergencies or disasters such as earthquakes, 
floods, tidal waves, etc., and a mutual aid program sup- 
ported by local legislation which would provide protec- 
tion to persons in the event they were injured while 
performing duties incident to the activities of the Disas- 
ter Corps should be enacted. These great organizations 
which were formed during the emergency must not be 
allowed to fall apart, but they should be re-activated and 
made part of the security planning programs of Police 
Departments. 

.\111. Stolen' PROPERT^• File 
^^'hile law enforcement officials have made great 



LEWIS A. STUCK, M. D. 

LATHAM SQUARE BUILDING 



OAKLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



■THE FOOD YOU LIKE" 

GENE COMPTONS 

SAN FRANCISCO: Market at Van Ness - 333 Geary Street - 144 
Ellis Street - 8-10 Kearny Street - 45 Powell Street 

OAKLAND: 12th & Broadway. All Stores Open Day and Night. 

Phon; Piedmont 0185 



PEERLESS LAUNDRY CO. 



LAUNDERERS AND DRY CLEANERS 



4 701 GRO\E STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phones: OLympic 2620 - Res. TRinidad 9036 Walter W. Pacheco 

DIAMOND DAIRY 

PRODUCTS OF QUALITY 



4706 GROVE STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



BUY WAR BONDS 
AND STAMPS 



Phone TWinoaks 2244 



Matt Franicevich 



FOR THE FINEST SEA FOOD DINNERS VISIT 

FISHERMAN'S PIER 

OAKLAND SEA FOOD GROTTO 
Sea Foods to Take Home - We Cater to Banquets - Cocktail Lounffe 

FOOT of FRANKLIN STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 

Phone HIghgate 2328 Pete Reali 

FAMOUS FOR ITS FOOD - FINEST OF LIQUORS 

CENTRAL CAFE 

IN THE HEART OF OAKL.AND 
BUFFET LUNCH - DINNERS - DRAFT BEER 



4 12 FOURTEENTH STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Compliments of 



CONGER'S PLACE 



SAN PABLO and PARK 



EMERYVILLE, CALIF. 



Apnl, 1945 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 51 



strides in establishing and maintaining Bureaus for the 
exchange of criminal histories and fingerprint identifica- 
tion of criminals, we have not given the stolen property 
problem the attention which it deserves. 

We have long recognized the necessity of establishing 
a national master stolen property file in which would 
be filed cards bearing a description of articles which 
bear some identifying mark or number and are capable 
of being described, carded and filed. These articles would 
include guns, cameras, watches, washing machines, jewel- 
ry and silverware bearing initials, in fact all identifiable 
property. A uniform record card could be used and when 
police departments make out the stolen property card for 
their own files, two extra cards can be prepared, one for 
the State Bureau and the other for the National Bureau. 
By establishing this system individual departments would 
be relieved of the necessity of carding descriptions of 
property which was stolen outside of their local jurisdic- 
tions, which cards often clutter up the files because can- 
cellations are not made when such property is recovered, 
which results in an overloaded dead file. In jurisdictions 
where pawnshops and second-hand stores are required to 
file a report in the office of the Chief of Police, reflecting 
their buying and lending transactions, a similar procedure 
could be followed. 

In taking the description of the articles which have 
come into the possession of the dealer, triplicate cards 
should also be prepared and forwarded as indicated above. 
I his operation would no doubt require some extra work 
but the tremendous benefits which would be gained by 
law enforcement officials by receiving information as to 
the location of stolen property would more than offset 
the additional labor involved. If a uniform system was 
installed at the master repository, the only employments 
that would be necessary would be an adequate filing 
staff. 

In-as-much as the Federal Bureau of Investigation is 
the central clearing house for the fingerprints and crim- 
inal records of this country, it is recommended that steps 
be taken to establish a national stolen property file under 
their supervision and that the Committee on Uniform 
Crime Reporting give consideration to this recommenda- 
tion. 

* * * 

In conclusion, this Committee desires to impress upon 
every Chief of Police and heads of all law enforcement 
units the gravity of the situation with which we will be 
shortly confronted. By courageously assuming the lead 
in the post-war planning programs of our respective 
communities and demanding that the police problems 
receive the consideration to which they are rightfully 
entitled, we can retain the position in the affections of 
our people which we have accepted during the past three 
years when the country looked to the law enforcement 
officials for internal security and protection. It is our 
golden opportunity and I am sure that we will not be 
found wanting. 

(The End) 



Phone Piedmont 5960 



JIMMY EVANS LIQUORS 

Beer by Case — Eastern and Western 
Complete Stock Whiskies, Rum and Brandies 



3212 COLLEGE AVENUE 



BERKELEY. CALIF. 



Phone Hlghgate 9364 



E. G. Hartwick 



EDDIE'S CORNER 

Candies, Tobaccos, Magazines and Good Liquors 
2009-11 GROVE STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone Hlghgate 9413 



Vince Monzo 



Leno Pagni 



Newport Restaurant and Cocktail Lounge 

ITALIAN DINNERS 
Featuring Steak and Chicken a la Saute 



131 BROADWAY 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phones: Office, GArfield 7 190; CArfield 6967 



DOLORES BEAUTY SHOP 



150 POWELL STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone suiter 5342 

CLARK DISTRIBUTING CO. 

Pacific Coast Distributors for Wurlitzer Automatic Phonographs 

4 15 BRANNAN STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone sutler 0475 

SUBMARINE SIGNAL COMPANY 

Boston, Massachusetts 



86 BEALE STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone Mission 2098 



Our 3 7th Year M. L. Chrlstophe 



CHRISTOPHE'S 

GUARANTEED RADIO SERVICE 

Radios and Repairing - Records and Albums 

Musical Instruments - Art Goods 



2388 MISSION STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone GArfield 7207 

Hough Patent Boiler Feed Checks — Lane Life Boat 

Walter Kidde & Co., Inc.; Rich Smoke Detecting System; Lux Fire 

Extinguishing System; Selex-Zonit Fire Detection System 

HOUGH 8C EGBERT CO. 

Sales Agents for Marine Equipment 
311 CALIFORNIA STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



Page 52 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



April, 1945 



WILLIAMS BROTHERS PENSIONED AS 
S. F. POLICE OFFICERS 

Officer Alfred C. Williams was retired last month from 
the San Francisco Police Department, with pension, after 
'56 years" of honorable service. 

During his long membership in the Department Officer 
Williams has served in many capacities, and with great 
credit to the unit of government he had chosen for his 
life"s work as well as to himself. He has the distinction 
of being the first motorcycle officer to be employed by the 
city. We say the city, instead of the Police Department, 
for hack in 1903 when it became evident that the foot- 
powered bicycles being used to patrol Golden Gate Park 
could not keep up with the new-appearing automobiles, 
the Park Commissioners tried to sell the idea to the Police 
Commission that they should purchase a motorcycle for 
patrolling the Park. The Police Commission could see no 
sense to such a thing but replied if the Park Commission 
wanted to buy a motorcycle it would detail a police officer 
to ride It. The Park boys bought a motorcycle and young 
Officer Williams was ordered to ride it. 

He did pretty well on the old Rambler he was assigned 
to ride, covering the series of unpaced driveways in the 
Park as well as adjacent streets. He sen.'ed two years 
on this novel experiment. 

For a number of years he was bailiif in the Police 
Courts and during late years has sen.'ed in various police 
districts. When he took his pension he was at the top in 
years of service as a member of the Police Department. 

Last August Lieutenant Robert V. Williams, a brother 
of Sergeant Al Williams, took a pension after 50 years 
and one month as a member of the San Francisco Police 
Department. 

Lieutenant Williams joined up on June 30, 1905, at 
the age of 22 years. He, with his brother, was born and 
reared in San Francisco. 

Though he served in many of the district stations of 
the city, he served several hitches with the Traffic Bu- 
reau, and from February' 1941 to July 1942, was assigned 
to Headquarters Company. At the time of his retirement 
he was with Company I. 

The Lieutenant was one of the best dressed men in 
the Department, besides being a courageous and efficient 
Police Officer. 

Phone TEmplebar 6040 Difficult Forming and Drawing of Metals 

Continental Machine Works, Ltd. 

Tool and Die Makers - Machinists - Metal Stampings 
Contract Manufacturers 

725-729 eth STREET bet. Castro and Brush Streets. OAKLAND 



Phone HIghgate 8768 



J. D. NOBLE 



NOBLE COMPANY 

CONCRETE PLANTS 



Telephone GLencourt 1814 

S. KULCHAR & CO. 

FINE CABINET WORKS — STORE AND BANK FIXTURES 



Mill and Office 
EIGHTH AVE. and E. 10th STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone HIgate 7862 



J Ulrich 



CADMIUM, CHROMIUM PLATING 



CALIF. ELECTRO PLATING WORKS 

Household Hardware, Auto Parts Polished and Refinished 
Gold, Silver, Nickel, Copper, Bronze — Brass Plating and Oxidizing 



I 132 EAST 12th STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



KEllogg 2-8012 



KIPPLEY & LEE 

L. M. KIPPLEY. Prop. 
AUTO TRUCK ENGINEERS AND BUILDERS 



18th AVE. and E 12th STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone OLympic 8528 



Central Sheet Metal and Roofing Co. 

General Sheet Metal Work and Roofing - Complete Roof and Sheet 

Metal Job - Ventilating and Skylights 
Labeled Underwriters Firedoor, Kalamein Door, Jambs and Trim 



3245 ETTIE STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone SWeetwood 2 800 



T. R. Bill 



STANDARD TRAILER CO. 

Semi-Trailers, Full Trailers, Logging Dollies, 6-WheeI Attachments 



415 SAN LEANDRO BOULEVARD SAN LEANDRO. CALIF. 



Phone KEllogg 2-6720 



EUREKA MILL & LUMBER CO. 

Lumber eand Mill Work - Composition Roofing 



3737 SAN LEANDRO STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone KEllogg 3-2121 



The Standard Since Ifi 



PACIFIC TANK & PIPE CO. 

Division of Gorman Lumber Sales Company 
Cooling Towers - Crossarms - Wood Tanks - Wood Pipe 



462 5 TIDEWATER AVENUE 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



I860 SEVENTH STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone KEllogg 4-0513 

ART RATTAN WORKS 

Incorporated 

DISTINCTIVE RATTAN FURNITURE 

Factories: Oakland. Calif,; Mansfield. Ohio: Topton. Pa. 

1218 MILLER AVENUE OAKLAND, CALIF. 



April, 1945 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 53 



JIGGS' 

Cocktail Bar and 

Booth Service 

Choice Liquors in Our Package Department 

1312 MACDONALD AVENUE 
RICHMOND, CALIF. 

Phone Richmond 1177 Ralph Vesper, Prop. 



SNACK SHACK No. 1 

767 So. 23rd Street 
Richmond, Calif. 

SNACK SHACK No. 2 

So. 14th & Wright Ave. 
Richmond, Calif. 

Both near Yard No. 2 



We Also Sell Gloves 
And Serve Breakfast and Lunch 



Compliments of 
* 

BROTHERHOOD of PAINTERS, 

DECORATORS 8c PAPERHANGERS 

of AMERICA 

Local Union No. 560 



Richmond 



California 



Phone Vallejo 3-9077 

CHINESE & AMERICAN FOODS 

featuring 

CHOW MEIN, CHOP SUEY, FRIED 

SHRIMP. SHORT ORDERS 

Orders to Take Out 

Hours 4 p. m. to 1:30 a. m. Daily 

Closed Mondays 

NEW CHINA CAFE 
517 MARIN ST. VALLEJO, CALIF. 

Opp. Times-Herald Office 



Complintents of 

DOPEY NORMAN^S 

124 GEORGIA STREET 
VALLEJO, CALIF. 



Phone Vallejo 3-6613 

NAVY RUG CLEANING CO. 

Myron Waters, Prop. 

Orientals, Domestic and Orerstujfed 
Furniture - Tent Furniture when possible 

• 

330 MARYLAND ST. VALLEJO, CALIF. 



Compliments of 

NATIONAL ICE 

AND COLD STORAGE 

CO., INC. 

OF CALIFORNIA 



Phones: Fairfield 164W - Vacaville 148W 



GILLESPIE CLEANERS 

Complete Cleaning and 
Dyeing Service 



B. GILLESPIE, Prop. 



Page 54 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 1945 



DUTIL SFPD RANGE MASTER 

Officer Emile Dutil. with a long and splendid record 
in the San Francisco Department, has qualified for a new- 
ly-created job with the S.F.P.D. — that of range master. 

In an examination, eligible for members of the depart- 
ment, held last December 5, he topped the list of those 
taking the test. On February 26 this year he was duly 
sworn in by Chief Charles W. Dullea as the first range 
master of the police force. 

Emil Dutil has made a life study of pistol and rifle 
shooting and he has been one of the most energetic of our 
members in getting the higher-up behind every move to 
make it possible for every policeman to get the maximum 
experience in marksmanship and learn how to shoot the 
weapons with which he is armed when he is sworn in as 
a peace officer. 

He was a moving spirit in the Traffic Officers Revolver 
club, and when Officer Gremminger retired as police 
armorer. Officer Dutil was put in charge, and acted in 
that capacity until the new police range out on the shore 
of Lake Merced was opened. Then he was transferred 
with his equipment, to the new range and given charge 
of heading the men assigned to handle the many shooting 
matches. 

Then the new rank of range master was provided by 
resolution of Police Commissioners Jerd Sullivan, J. Wes- 
ley Howell and E. L. Turkington, and a date set for an 
examination for the selection of a capable man. Dutil 
won the right to be selected and is now doing his share' 
in making the range the success it was meant to be, and 
in helping all peace officers using the range to enjoy the 
modern advantages the big plant offers. 



R. R 


Mills, Owner 












TALL 


TREES TRAILER 


PARK 




1867 


NAPA ROAD 






VALLEJO. 


CALIF. 






Compliment 


s of 








ONE MILE 


HOUSE 




VALLEJO 








CALIF. 


Phone 3.3 101 






Al Ferrari 


, Owner 




VALLEJO MILK COMPANY 

HOME of RED TOP MILK 




639 


^JAPA ROAD 






VALLEJO, 


CALIF. 



Phone San Rafael 2-J-2 

China Camp Fishing Resort 

BASS FISHING - ROW BOATS FOR 
RENT ■ MOTOR BOAT SERVICE 
for Fishing, Picnic Grounds, Swimming 

FRESH SHRIMP and FISH 

5 MILES FROM SAN RAFAEL 

Henry Quan, Manager 



Phone TWinoaks 4543 

VICTORY WAFFLE SHOP 

Nick Carras, Prop. 

Breakfast - Luncheon - Dinner 

Fountain Service 

Open from 6 A.M. to 12 Midnight 
3310 Grand Ave. Oakland, Calif. 



N. M. BALL SONS 



General Contractors 



685 Delaware St. Berkeley 2, Calif. 



■fl~o~a-o-o-a-6"6"o"o"o"4"Tro"irrTnroTro'YTrT)"ro~a"o~o~«"6~r5"jr^ 
Phone OLympic 1517 

GOLDEN WEST MEAT CO. 

L. C. Taylor, Manager 
* 
: BEEF - LAMB - VEAL 

: * 

; 6541 Bay Street Emeryville, Calif. _, 

-B-BJ)JULttJ_BJL8-8-fiJLOJULgJ>JLOJL8JLSJ?J>JL^JJU)-0J>JlJLfi-e 



Phone Piedmont 8580 

N. Stathos, Prop. 

New Ritz Cafe 

Specializing in 

STEAKS and CHICKEN 
DINNERS 

3866 San Pablo Ave. Emeryville, Calif. 



April. 1945 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 55 



Sheriff Thornton of Solano County 



SherifF John R. Thornton, of Solano County, was 
one of the youngest men elected as chief county peace 
officer in California. Today he enjoys a record for con- 
tinuous service that but few men holding this important 
office in this state ever attains. Last January he com- 
pleted 18 years as chief law enforcement officer of his 




Sheriff Jack Thornton 
of Solano Coiintv 

native county. In those years he has built up a reputa- 
tion as a peace officer that none other has ever exceeded 
and none are apt to do that in future years. 

Sherilf Thornton, veteran of World War I, returned 
to Vallejo, his home, from France, where he was wound- 
ed in the Argonne-Meuse famous oifense of the Ameri- 
can Expeditionary forces. The day following his return 
he was sworn in as a supervisor for Solano County by 
the then Governor, W. D. Stephens. He served an un- 
expired term and was re-elected for another term without 
any opposition, so well had he served the people of his 
county. 

Though he had been engaged in business in Vallejo, 
and successfully, prior to enlisting in the 363 Infantry, 
he could not return to that business because the people 
of Solano County, so well pleased with the manner he 
had served as a supervisor determined he was the man 
they wanted for sherilf. He was persuaded to let his 
name be presented as a candidate for the office in the 
election of 1927. He was elected by an imposing vote. 
He has been re-elected four times since, with no opposition 
worthy of the name at each election. 

The veteran Sheriff has seen many changes in law en- 
forcement, and he had been a moving part in the better- 
ment of that law enforcement in California, for he is 
looked upon and called for advice by fellow peace officers 
of the various jurisdictions and by his various state ad- 



ministrations that have served California during his long 
tenure. 

He has seen- his own county become one of the most 
active in war work, and the location of many training 
and encampment centers of various branches of our war 
service. 

He has seen the population of Solano County increased 
by the tens of thousands, and he has seen streams of 
motor vehicles and miles of freight trains pass through 
Solano county carrying important war materials. 

With all these increased activities in industry and pop- 
ulation he has kept the peace of his county at a most 
creditable low stage. 

Working with the police of incorporated towns, with 
constables of the various townships and others having 
to do with law enforcement in Solano County, he and his 
deputies have kept the crime situation well in hand. There 
have been no mstances of a crime wave, and it is surprising 
the low number of robberies and burglaries that have 
occurred during these war years in the important county 
of Solano. 

Sheriff Thornton is a kindly man, with a human un- 
derstanding of his fellow citizens. He has kept these vir- 
tues throughout the years as enthusiastically as he dis- 
played them when he took over office 18 years ago. 

Like all peace officer chiefs, he has had his troubles 
with a manpower shortage, but with the force at his dis- 
posal he has done one bang up job of enforcing the law 
of the land and keeping peace in his jurisdiction. 

Phone San Rafael At] George Le Fevre - C. F. (Red) Cannon 

THE RECREATION PARLOR 

"Where All the Boys Meet' 
BEER, LIQUORS, TOBACCO AND SOFT DRINKS 

842 . 4TH STREET SAN RAF AEL. CALIF. 

Phone San Rafael I 786 L. Milani. Prop. 

THE PROGRESS 

WINES - LIQUORS AND BEERS 

848 "B" STREET SAN RAFAEL, CALIF. 

WALHALLA TAVERN 

BEER — WINE — LIQUORS 

201 BRIDGEWAY BOULEVARD SAUSALITO. CALIF. 

Telephone S. A. 2555 Oscar Scheibe 

OSCAR'S TIVOLI CAFE 

. . . COCKTAIL LOUNGE . . . 

556 SAN ANSELMO AVENUE SAN ANSELMO. CALIF. 

Phone 222 6 Paul Nave. Prop. 

CASCADE INN 

BAR SERVICE 

20 BOLINAS ROAD FAIRFAX. CALIF. 

JOHN F. BRANN 

TAVERN . . . COCKTAILS - WINES - LIQUORS 
813 FOURTH STREET SAN RAFAEL. CALIF. 



Page 56 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



April, 1945 



ROSS GENERAL 
HOSPITAL 

• 

ROSS, CALIFORNIA 



GOHEEN 
CONSTRUCTION CO. 

* 

MILL VALLEY, CALIF. 



BILL YOUNG MOTORS 



'AfterWeSell,WeSerye" 

Complete Automotive 
Service 



USED CARS 



22 Miller Avenue 852 Fourth Street 
MILL VALLEY SAN RAFAEL 

Phone 305 Phone 3470 




Phone Richmond 768 

JOHN EKLUND CO. 

A. F. IVEAGH 

Feed - Fuel - Garden Supplies 

1636 MACDONALD AVENUE 
RICHMOND, CALIF. 



Phone 5497 

Harry Avery Joe Foley 

MARIN AUTO 
TOGGERY 

Tailors of Fine Automobile Interiors 

* 
1615 Fourth St. San Rafael, Calif. 



Phone 429 

SAN ANSELMO BOWLING 
ACADEMY 

BEER - SANDWICHES 

SOFT DRINKS 

Open 1 to 12 P.M. 

70 Greenfield Ave., San Anselmo, Calif. 



Phone 1550 

Victor's Machine & 
Repair Shop 

Manufacturing 

Builders of Special Machinery 
Welding - Blacksmithing 

1209 Third Street San Rafael, Calif. 



Phone San Rafael 97 F. Bordenave, Prop. 

100' t Food Value for those who are fussy in 
choosing their Bakery 

SAN RAFAEL BAKERY 



1553 4th Street 



San Rafael, Calif. 



ApnJ, 1945 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 

Larkspur Auxiliary Police 



Page 57 



The Larkspur Police Auxiliary 
meeting on the Hth of January, 1 
for the year 1945. 

The newly-elected officers are: 

President Charles E. Neils; 

Vice President Russel Brutcher 
• Secretary R. P. Elder; 

Treasurer William Wegner. 



held its second annual 
945, and elected officers 




Chief W. V. Nicholson 

All of the officers have been with the police auxiliary 
from the date it was founded and have taken an active 
part in the National Defense program, together with their 
regular work in assisting the Larkspur Police Force. The 
officers in private life are engaged in business in San 
Francisco and although some of them are executives, they 
sacrifice their personal time to the organization. The or- 
ganization has been held intact, although most similar 
organizations have disbanded. Meetings are held regular- 
ly and the members are trained in all of the arts of Police 
work. At each meeting police problems, as well as social 
problems, are discussed. 

The members are all experts in the use of firearms and 
in many of the other skilled fields of police work. The 
residents of Larkspur are rightfully proud of this grand 
body of men who are doing a noble job and stand ready 
to give Chief William Nicholson their assistance. 

President Charles E. Neils is an executive in a San 
Francisco business firm and his interest in the police aux- 
iliary will assure a successful year and a continuance of the 
organization. President Neils has made plans to make 
the organization even more interesting and hopes to pre- 
sent capable speakers and authorities on police subjects 
to his group. He is very much interested in the problems 



of Juvenile delinquency and is outlining a plan to assist 
in coping with this serious question. The community is 
fortunate in having this capable man to head the auxil- 
iary. 

Russell Brutcher, Vice President, is a skilled chemist, 
but has devoted much of his valuable time to the organ- 
ization, Brutcher will capably assist President Neils. 

R. P. Elder, Secretary, needs no introduction in the 
police field. He has been doing police work for many 
years and his experience will be of high value to the 
auxiliary. 

William Wegner, Treasurer, is one of the highly re- 
spected men in Marin County and for years was a con- 
tractor-builder, now retired. 



Belvedere 106 



Belvedere 72 



ANCHOR CAFE TIBURON 

CHIOPPINO AND DINNERS 

SAM \'ELLA and SAM OLSON 



Pho 



2055 



Emergency Road Service Station 



ROSS GARAGE 

NORMAN L. SHEPLEY, Proprietor 

TOWING - REPAIRS - TAXI SERVICE 
Complete Tune-Up — Lubrication 

ROSS, CALIFORNIA 



Phone Mill Valley 1785 

TIBURON MARKET 

Open from 9:00 A, M. to 7:00 P. M., including Sundays 

GROCERIES - FRUITS - VEGETABLES - DELICATESSEN 

FROSTED FOODS - ICE CREAM - BEER - WINE 



ALTO. CALIFORNIA 



NORTHWEST COR, OF HIGHWAY 



OLympic 4 12 1 



GArfield 6760 



United Autographic Register Company 

DESIGNERS - BUSINESS SYSTEMS - PRODUCERS 



1255 PARK AVENUE 
OAKLAND 8, CALIF, 



450 MISSION STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 5 



Telephone KEIlog 4-2626 

DR. J. C. SCHIVELEY, D. C. 

HEMORRHOIDAL TREATMENTS 

t 

3124 EAST 14th STREET (Professional Building) OAKLAND 

Phone TEmplebar 9432 

FRANK E. SIMMONS' TIP CLUB 

EAT AND SIP AT THE TIP 



1601 CYPRESS STREET 



OAKLAND. Calif, 



Page 58 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 1945 



POLICE BALL BIG SUCCESS 

The annual concert and hall of the San Francisco Police 
Department's Widows' and Orphans" Aid Association 
was held in the Civic Auditorium on the evening of April 
7. The sale of tickets this year was the largest in the 67 
years' history' of the Association. The net proceeds will 
go a long way in making up the demands on the treas- 




Captain M. E. Mitchell 

ury of this worthy organi-ation which for the year 1944 
paid out insurance heneiits to the families of 26 members 
who passed on during the 1 2 months. 

Following is the list of those who have answered their 
final roll call: 

Maurice Hayes, Jan. 10; Frank P. ScoUm, Jan. 29; 
Donald R. Campbell, Jan. 3 1 ; Francis A. Mahoney, Feb. 
7; Henr>' Cills, Feb. 19; Edward A. Miller, Feb. 22; Thos. 
F. Burke, Feb. 25; Norman F. Dunne, Sr., May 5; John 
J. Mullin. May 12; Patrick Sullivan, May 14; James P. 
ColHns, May 23; John E. Gleeson, Sr.. June 2; Walter 
Mitchell, June 19; 

Gilbert P. Chase, June 2i; Isaac E. Norris, June 27; 
Lawrence L. Jackson, June 28; Nels J. Mathewson, July 
22; Joseph D. Hayden, Aug. 4; James A. Belyea, Aug. 9; 
James J. Grifiin, Sept. 6; Goodman H. Lance, Sept. 30; 
Thomas J. Larkin, Oct. 8: Philip J. Fraher, Oct. 30; Man- 
uel F. Rose, Nov. 27; Edward D. Murphy, Dec. 2; Ed- 
ward J. Wiskotchill, Dec. 18. 

The committee on arrangements for this year's show 
was headed by Captain Michael E. Mitchell, chairman. 
Lieutenant Edward Pootel, Lieutenant John Meehan, Of- 
ficer Henry M. Schutzer and Officer Matthew C. Car- 
bury, with 120 other members of the Department serving 
under them, did a swell job and deserve a lot of credit 
for the success of the event. 

Deputy Chief Michael Riordan was chairman of the 
Reception Committee; Inspector Percy H. Kenealy headed 
the floor committee, and Sergeant John E. Dolan, the 
Police Veterans' Committee. 

A fine vaudeville show followed the concert and fol- 
lowing these numbers. Chief Dullea presented the fol- 
lowing distinguished guests: Governor Earl Warren (he 
never misses this annual show), Mayor Roger Lapham, 



Atlas Imperial 

Diesel Engine 

Company 

OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 



Phone HIghgate 9581 

Dancing Nightly 

1810 CLUB 

L. C. Smith 
No Cover Charge - No Minimum Charge 
1810 San Pablo Oakland, Calif. 



W. C. Grant, Vice Pres. and Mgr. 

ACME ROLLING 
DOORS, INC. 

Since 1900 
3535 Peralta Street Oakland, Calif. 



Phone Richmond 954 

Woulf & Ury 

JEWELERS 

Diamonds, Watches, Jewelry 
Expert Watch Repair 

602 MACDONALD AVE. 
RICHMOND, CALIF. 



April, 1945 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 59 



Commissioners Jerd Sullivan, J. Wesley Howell and E. 
L. Turkington, Chief City Administrator Thomas A. 
Brooks, and Officer Walter L, Sullivan, who served as 
Association president for 1944. 

Meritorious service awards were presented to a large 
number of police officers who distinguished themselves 
during the past 12 months. 

At 10 P. M. the grand march started, with Mayor and 
Mrs. Lapham, Governor and Mrs. Warren leading, fol- 
lowed by Chief and Mrs. DuUea and Police Commission- 
ers and their wives, and until curfew hour the dance floor 
was crowded with dancers. 

Phone 3-4581 

SOLANO MEAT COMPANY 



WHOLESALE BUTCHERS 
Government Inspected Est. 285 



P. O. BOX 728 



VALLEJO, CALIF. 



Phone 3-8121 



Open 8 A.M. - 6 P.M. 



TOM HAY GROCERY STORE 

GROCERIES - MEAT - FRUIT - VEGETABLES 



703 NAPA ROAD 



VALLEJO. CALIF. 



Pho 



359 



Mrs. A. Dreith, Own. 



SUISUN 



THE OASIS 

BEER - FINE WINES and LIQUORS 
LIGHT LUNCHES 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone 522 S. Williams. Own. 

NEW ARLINGTON HOTEL 

SUISUN CALIFORNIA 



The 

MECHANICS 

BANK 




RICHMOND, CALIFORNIA 



EL CERRITO 



ALBANY 



i I 

\ Andrew Williams \ 

I Stores I 

i * 

i * 

i ^ * 

i t 

\ Oakland, Calif. | 



Jusf 5Cf/...''G0UGH AT MARKET' 

and you're there 

Shop the easy way. Streetcars J, K, L, M, N, 6, 7 and 17 stop 
in front of our door. 

Get a fine Fleecedown mattress at our easy to reach manufactur- 
ing store. Airflex, experts in sleeping needs, will advise and help 
you select the mattress exactly suited to you. 
If you drive we have a large free parking lot adjoining our store. 
Mattresses shipped free of charge to any railroad point in the 
United States. 



AIRFLEX 



EDWARD McROSKEY 

16S7 MARKET STREET ' 
Opposite Gough Street 



MATTRESS CO. 

SAN FRANCISCO 
Free Parking 



PLAY AND RELAX at... 


PLAYLAND 


at the BEACH 


Located at Ocean Beach near the historic 
Cliff House and famed Seal Rocks. 


Home of Thrill-Provoking Rides ... Unique Restaurants 
fronting the Blue Pacific ... Oceans of Fun for Everyone! 


Owned and Operated by 

WHITNEY BROTHERS 



Phone 924 



H. B. Brown, Mgr. 



MOTOR INN 

Hotel - Apartments 

CASH GROCERY 

LIQUORS - WINES - BEER 

2009 BRIDGEWAY 
SAUSALITO CALIFORNIA 



Page 60 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



April, 1 94 J 



Nine-Hour Day For Men on Night Duty 

At a meeting of the Police Commission held on Mon- 
day, Fehruar>' 26, the following resolution was adopted: 

Whereas, the War Manpower Commission has placed 
a midnight curfew upon business; and 

Whereas, the said War Manpower Commission has re- 
quested the cooperation of the San Francisco Police De- 
partment in the enforcement of said curfew; and 

Whereas, the Police Commission is desirous of render- 
ing full cooperation in the foregoing matter: and 

Whereas, an important International Conference is 
scheduled to take place in the City and County of San 
Francisco, commencing as of April 25, 1945; and said 
International Conference will require added police pro- 
tection and police activity; and 

Whereas, the San Francisco Police Department is ser- 
iously handicapped by lack of personnel; and 

Whereas, subdivision "F", Section 35.5J/2 of the Char- 
ter of the City and County of San Francisco authorizes 
the Police Commission to require members of the Police 
Department to work more than forty-eight (48) hours 
per week, when public necessity requires said work; and 

Whereas, the curfew imposed by the War Manpower 
Commission and the International Conference, hereinbe- 
fore mentioned, require services from members of the 
Police Department in excess of forty-eight (48) hours per 
week, and public necessity requires said additional serv- 
ices; and 

Whereas, the Police Commission has determined, and 
does hereby determine and declare, that public necessity 
requires that foot patrolmen, now assigned for duty on 
the watches known and referred to as the 4 P. M. to 12 
midnight, and the 7 P. M. to 3 A. M. watches, shall work 
nine (9) hours per day for six (6) days per week; there- 
fore, be it 

RESOLVED, by the Police Commission that a nine 
(9) hour watch is hereby established for foot patrolmen, 
now or hereafter assigned to the two (2) watches here- 
inbefore referred to, namely, the 4 P. M. to 12 midnight 
and the 7 P. M. to ? A. M. watches, and that the foot 
patrolmen on the two (2) watches referred to shall be 
required to word nine (9) hour watches for six (6) days 
per week, and that the commencement hour for the said 
nine (9) hours of police duty shall he determined by the 
Chief of Police; and be it 

FURTHER RESOLVED, that the foot patrolmen so 
working said nine (9) hour watches, shall, at their option, 
be granted and paid added compensation or time off with 
pay for extra services performed: and be it 

FURTHER RESOLVED, that this resolution shall be 
effective as of 8 o'clock A. M. on Thursday, March 1st, 
1945, and shall continue in effect thereafter until further 
action of the Police Commission. 

AYES: Commissioners Turkington, Howell, Sullivan. 

Chief Dullea, in conformity with the provisions of the 
above resolution, announced foot patrolmen shall work 
watches as follows, in lieu of the two above named watch- 
es: 4 P. M. to 1 A. M.. and 7 P. M. to 4 A. M., in reg- 
ular rotation, as heretofore. 



Station Phone KEllog 2-9749 

Shop Phone KEllog 4-5163 

SQUARE FOUR 
MOTOR SERVICE 

Authorized Factory Service 

CARBURETOR - SPEEDOMETER 
CLOCK Repairs - MOTOR Tune-up 
BRAKE SERVICE - MOTORCYCLE 
REPAIRS . . . PROMPT SERVICE 

See RA.Y BELL for Complete Lubrica- 
tion, Tire Recapping, Gasoline and Oil 

Dan Hagen - Vern Gardner - Bill Theede 

4825 FOOTHILL BOULEVARD 
OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phon TWinoaks 5522 



HURLEY MARINE 
WORKS INC. 



le-^ss^i^rsn 



Foot of Fifth Avenue 
Oakland California 



April, J 94? 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 61 



Phone 3. 5554 

GROWER'S MARKET 

Groceries, Fruits and Vegetables - Meat and Fish 
173 7 SONOMA STREET VALLEJO, CALIF. 

TAVERN 

SCOTTY'S POPCORN SHOP 

WINE - BEER - LIQUORS 



42 1 GEORGIA STREET 



VALLEJO. CALIF. 



Phone 20889 



L. Lewis, owner 



LAKESIDE DAIRY 

PATRONIZE THOSE WHO PATRONIZE YOU 
4 15 NAPA ROAD VALLEJO, CALIF. 

Phone 3-3763 

MONARCH SHEET METAL WORKS 



SONOMA at FLORIDA STREET 



VALLEJO, CALIF. 



UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT 



Telephone GLencourt 585 7 



JOHN TEHAN 

FOOD MACHINE MAINTENANCE SERVICE 
HOBART SALES & SERVICE 



334 12th STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Office: Hlgate 3770 Res: ALameda 3255.J 

Fresh. Salt and Smoked Fish — Crabs. Shrimps. Oysters. Scallops 

JOE PUCCI 8c SON 

WHOLESALE FISH DEALERS 

ALL KINDS OF SEA FOODS 
582 19th STREET— 411 MARKET CENTER— OAKLAND. CALIF. 

Phone ANdover 1015 



FAST FREEZERS— FOR ICE CREAM CABINETS 
— SERVICE — 

AMERICAN REFRIGERATION SALES 



1399 MacARTHUR BLVD. 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



TEmpIebar 0568 



William Leiter 



THE OMAR 

FINE WINES AND LIQUORS 



2086 BROADWAY 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone Piedmont 1826 



HUNTER'S INN 

For a Good Time . . . 
DANCING and ALL KINDS OF MIXED DRINKS 



PINOLE 



CALIFORNIA 



VALLEJO GARBAGE SERVICE 



Piedmont Lumber and Mill Company 



351 40th STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone DOuglas 0744. San Francisco 



Hlgate 5318. Oakland 



408 VIRGINIA STREET 



VALLEJO, CALIF. 



HUGH R. McGUIRE 



264 LACUNA HONDA BLVD. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone 231 



F. J. Brennan, Prop. 



GENERAL GARAGE 

Towingr - Wheel Aligning and Balancing - General Repairing 

Electric and Acetylene Welding - Body and Fender Work 

G M C Sales and Service 



Daniel Gallagher Teaming, Mercantile 8C 
Realty Company 

FOUNDRY AND SHIP SUPPLIES - GENERAL DRAYAGE 

172 BEALE, SAN FRANCISCO — 2505 MAGNOLIA, OAKLAND 
Phone GLencourt 1218 

AT YOUR SERVICE 

DURANT PLUMBING 

PLUMBING AND HEATING 

iOI2 WEBSTER STREET OAKLAND 7 

Telephone HUmboldt 7180 

STANDARD BEVERAGES 

ROYAL CROWN COLA — PAR-T-PAK— NEHI 
Also NEHI DISTRIBUTING CO., 920 Folsom St., San Francisco 



FAIRFIELD 



CALIFORNIA 3906 ADELINE STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Page 62 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



April. J 945 



WARNING— WATCH FOR COUNTER- 
FEIT GOVERNMENT CHECKS 

Counterfeit U. S. Government ehecks have recently been 
passed in northern Oklahoma and southern Kansas and the 
passer is believed headed West. 

This check is impressively printed on yellov,' safety paper 
and the specimen at hand looks something like this: 

UNITED STATES TREASURY DEPARTMENT 
Washington, D. C. 

Treasur>' Department Draft 
PAYABLE TO Royall Garrett, 6334357 

Disabled Veteran Bureau 

To the United States Treasury 

Washington, D. C, or any Bank W. A. Hoyt 

or United States Post Office Capt. Inf. D. O. L. 

Passer described as American, White, about 2 5, 5 feet 
8 to 10 inches, 1^0 pounds, slender build, dark brown 
hair combed straight back, no hat, pale complexion, sharp 
features, sickly appearance, very nervous, wearing khaki 
work clothing, brown leather jacket, might wear heavy 
sterling silver bracelet with design of two tulips. 

Notify United States Secret Service, San Francisco, 
EXbrook 2160. 



On February 16th, the following newly appointed 
Sergeants of Police assigned to companies shown : 

Sergeant Joseph P. McVeigh, Co. A to Co. G. 

Sergeant Daniel F. Carrick, Co. K to Co. C. 

Sergeant Arthur L. Schwerdt, Co. B to Co. H. 

The following changes were made in this department: 

Sergeant William T. Brannan from Co. E to Co, H — 
for assignment on O&ce Duty (upon Police Physician 
Orders) . 

Sergeant Rudolph H. Maier, from Co. H to Co. B — 
assigned to Day Watch. 

Sergeant John Murphy, from Co. C to Co. H — assigned 
to Day Watch. 

Officer Thomas J. Creighton, from Co. E to Co. K 
(A.P.B.). 



Phone "8 , D. Moretti. Prop. 

GENOVA MARKET 



DOMESTIC and IMPORTED GROCERIES 
FRUITS and VEGETABLES 



SUISUN 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone EXbrook 6958 

WESTERN ART CO. 

Photo Frames, All Types - Quality Work For Less 
543 MARKET STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Compliments of 

ANDREW WILLIAMS STORE 

HOURS 7:00 A. M. to 10 P. M. 
1900 SAN PABLO AVENUE EL CERRITO, CALIF. 



Phone HUmboIdt 7830-783 1 



WESTERN IRON & BODY WORKS 

STEEL TANK TRUCK BODIES — 

—INDUSTRIAL STEEL PRODUCTS 



1 165 67th STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone TEmplebar 13 19 



Paul Riedener 



Treasure Island Food Products 

GLACE FRUITS - COCKTAIL CHERRIES - FRUIT SALAD 
TREASURE ISLAND SOUP MIX 



1793 W. 12th STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



TE 9836 



MEET YOUR FRIENDS AT 



HARRY CLARK'S PARK CAFE 



1824 PARK BOULEVARD 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone GLencourt 7766 



Res. Hayward 894W 



DONALD W. VALENTINE 

Distributor 
McCALL'S DESERT AIR LAMP 



1410 WEBSTER STREET 



OAKLAND 12, CALIF. 



Phone HIgate 95 16 For Reservations 



THE ELMS RESTAURANT 

WE FEATURE (When Possible) PLANKED STEAKS 

New York, Filet Mignon and Club Steaks Served on a Sizzling 
Seasoned Oak Plank 



1700 FRANKLIN STREET 



OAKLAND 



HIgate 753 1 

AL REALFS MECCA 

(The Boss and 1 We Thank You) 
BEST LIQUOR, WINE, BEER— LUNCHES & CIGARS 

1604 SAN PABLO AVE. OAKLAND. CALIF. 

Office OLympic 223 I Herb Richardson, Les Fields 

Insured Vans — Estimates Quoted 

Dick's Van 8C Storage - Dick's Express 

GUARANTEED RELIABLE SERVICE 
Moving - Packing - Storage — Local and Long Distance Hauling 

6526 TELEGRAPH AVE. OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Telephone HIgate 6305 

-RECEIVERS AND DISTRIBUTORS- 

FARMERS' PRODUCE CORPORATION 

WHOLESALE FRUITS AND PRODUCE 

423 SECOND STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 



April, J 94? 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 63 



Telephone HI gate 3 342 



Established 18^6 



Union Pacific Linen 8C Towel Sup. Laundry LOOMIS ARMORED CAR SERVICE 



We Rent TOWELS, LINEN, APRONS, GARMENTS 

(white and various colors) 



84 PAGE STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



830 28th STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone KEllog 2-9950 



Phone HIgate 921 I 



Pete Salomon 



PARK CAFE 

MIXED DRINKS — GOOD EATS 



FRUITVALE BOWL 

House of Hospitality 
BEER and SANDWICHES 



594 12th STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 3 125 E. 14th STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



TE 1435 



VIC LONG'S CLUB DINER 



BUY WAR BONDS 



631 EAST 12th STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



HIgate 9908 



Cocktails 



ADELINE SEVEN 

C. A. Perry. D. E. Perry, Props. 
LIQUORS WINES - BEERS — GOOD EATS 

1151 SEVENTH STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Phone HUmboldt 7830-7831 

WESTERN IRON 8C BODY WORKS 

STEEL TANK TRUCK BODIES - INDUSTRIAL STEEL PRODUCTS 



FIGHT THE WAR BUY BONDS 



MAXIE'S 



15 17 FRANKLIN STREET 



OAKLAND 



VULCAN FOUNDRY 



1165 67th STREET 



OAKLAND 8, CALIF. 4401 SAN LEANDRO BLVD. 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



AShberry 9800 



ENterprise 10983 



PACIFIC STEEL CASTING COMPANY 

An organization whose metallurgical and engineering experience is 
at your command to help you economically solve your problems 
and assure you of a dependable source of supply on your require- 
ments for Small, Medium, Carbon, Alloy, Pressure, Intricate 
STEEL CASTINGS 



1333 SECOND STREET 



BERKELEY 2. CALIF. 



HIgate 7521 

INCINERATOR ENGINEERING CO. 

INCINERATORS AND INDUSTRIAL FURNACES 

20th and FRANKLIN STREETS OAKLAND 12 



HIgate 5734 



TEmplebar 4820 



PEERLESS YEAST CO. 



S. H. HANSEN 



PETE AND JACK 

BODY and FENDER WORKS 
AUTO PAINTING 



815 CLAY STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



2600 TELEGRAPH AVENUE 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



TE 9383 



SHELL, STATION 

ANSEL F. BUSHART 

MOTOR TUNE UP - LUBRICATION 
AUTOMOBILE ACCESSORIES 



PAY LESS GROCERY 

GREETINGS TO ALL OF OUR FRIENDS 
IN EAST-BAY POLICE DEPARTMENTS 



369 GRAND AVENUE 



OAKLAND. CALIF. >901 TELEGRAPH AVENUE 



OAKLAND 12, CALIF. 



Phone 18 



SUISUN 



THE RED «c WHITE STORES phone 5 



F. P. HOOPER 

GROCERS 



ROCKVILLE GARDENS 



CALIFORNIA FAIRFIELD 



CALIFORNIA 



Page 64 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL April. 1945 



THornwall 1632 E. O. Corson. Owner and Manager 

Phone TW 5827 

ACTEEN CHEMICAL SERVICE CO. 
JIMMIE DUGAN'S TAVERN pest control service 

Manufacturers and Jobbers of Insecticides, Herbicides, Fertilizers 
BILL JOHNSON Ask your dealer for Empire SOILKORECTl VES 

"If it is a Pest we Control it" 
353 12th STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 



2nd and ADDISON STREETS BERKELEY 2. CALIF. 



OLympic 6587 MODERN and CLASSICAL Phone BErkeley 4236 

HENRY AMERIO ACCORDION CHATTERTON BAKERY 

STUDIO DAINTIES FOR DAINTY PEOPLE 

5040 TELEGRAPH AVENUE OAKLAND 9. CALIF. 2526 BANCROFT WAY BERKELEY, CALIF. 



TEmplebar 9840 Mae and Art Love COMPLIMENTS of BUCHANANS 

TRADE WINDS COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

THE FINEST IN DRINKS 



3332 GRAND AVENUE 



OAKLAND, CALIF. "' ^^^'^ ""^ STREET OAKLAND 



Phone Piedmont 8828 



Telephone TEmplebar 8100 Frank J. Youell 

CHAPEL OF THE OAKS 

OAKLAND MORTUARY 
COCKTAIL LOUNGE Funeral Directors 

4822 TELEGRAPH AVENUE OAKLAND, CALIF. '"O? TELEGRAPH AVENUE OAKLAND 9, CALIF. 



Len and Vic's Cocktail Lounge 



TE 3 163 

IDEAL STEAK HOUSE 

Opposite Hotel Oakland MARY MILLAR 

STEAKS, DINNERS, HOT & COLD FOUNTAIN FOODS COLOR PHOTOGRAPHY 

(by Appointment) 
Day or Night 



14th near HARRISON STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 



586 GRAND AVENUE OAKLAND, CALIF. 



TWinoaks 2944 Ray M. McCoy, Manager 

COMPLIMENTS OF GORDON PRUITT. Doing Business as 

GEMMELL'S BAKE SHOP GORDON'S FINE FOODS 

FULL COURSE DINNERS - COCKTAILS 

3264 GRAND AVENUE OAKLAND, CALIF. 

200 EAST 1 4th STREET OAKLAND 



Phone Mission 4030 

Compliments 

ERASER & JOHNSTON CO. -^'- 

Sheet Metal Fabricators HARRISON INN 

725 POTRERO AVENUE SAN FRANCISCO ,8,8 HARRISON STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 



DEI— 5807 ^^ ^„^^ 3^^^^^ 

SAN FRANCISCO HOG COMPANY CLIFF WIXSON JR. COCKTAIL BAR 

•^OLMA CALIFORNIA 3924 TELEGRAPH AVENUE OAKLAND 



April, 1945 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



Page 65 



MORE ON PIEDMONT 

(Contimied from page 6) 

Guards were assigned for the homes most Hkely to 
he attacked by the subversive, disorderly "goon squads" 
which in times like these arise to plague not only the pub- 
lic hut the most responsible leaders of the striking organi- 
zations. Others were stationed at the street barricades 
which had been hastily erected at each of the 10 or 12 
entrances to the city. They were ordered to stop every 
pedestrian and ever>' car at all costs and to let no one 
through who could not be properly identified. Many of 
the volunteers were friends of labor or even members of 
labor organizations but, regardless of the merits of the 
controversy, were bitterly opposed to this attempt by a 
small minority to put a strangle hold on the whole com- 
munity. 

The next day food and gasoline were running low. 
The regular police officers went in three open cars to 
the food and gasoline warehouses. They were armed 
with sub-machine guns and sawed off shot guns, all in 
plain sight. They crashed through the angry picket lines 
around the warehouses and convoyed the supplies to 
their destination. A single shot from the crowd or even 
a well aimed rock might have precipitated a tragedy, but 
nothing happened. Only one car of "rough necks"" slip- 
ped through the cordon and the four men in the car were 
jailed in a matter of minutes, the only one locked up dur- 
ing the emergency. 

Such a situation could not last. Military force took 
over in San Francisco, order was restored and the little 
"army"' in Piedmont was disbanded. Although more than 
a thousand had been investigated, sometimes with rancor 
and criticism, not a shot had been fired and no one was 
hurt. Nevertheless, no one wanted to repeat the experi- 
ment of putting police authority and weapons into the 
hands of 600 untrained citizens inflamed by resentment. 
No one knew when another emergency might arise. 
There was an immediate demand that future contingen- 
cies be foreseen. 

These then were the labor pains which brought forth 
the organization known as the Auxiliary Police, born of 
an emergency but thriving as civic pride. Seventy-two 
men were selected. Meetings were infrequent but the or- 
ganization was kept together. Ever>' entrance to the little 
city could be closed in 40 minutes. The patrol cars were 
equipped with two-way radio telephonic communication, 
the first in the United States. Under Chief William "V. 
Pflaum this has been constantly improved, all the equip- 
ment being made in the police shops at a fraction of the 
cost of commercial sets. Contrary to rule, there is no 
Chamber of Commerce, there are no vacant rooms or 
houses, and there is no business district except a half 
dozen retail stores. The civic ofiicials serve without pay 
and there has never been a breath of financial scandal. 
There is no juvenile delinquency. Boy and girl scouts 
flourish and fire and criminal hazards are far below nor- 
mal. About SO per cent of the high school graduates 



SCOTTY'S IDLE HOUR 
Cocktail Lounge 



3101 EAST 14th STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



TEmplebar 92 14 



PERRY'S 

MIXED DRINKS 



339 GRAND AVENUE 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone TEmplebar 9813 

SERENADER 504 

Distinctive Cocktails - Delicious Chicken and Steaks 



LAKE PARK 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



BURMA COCKTAIL LOUNGE 



3255 LAKESHORE 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone HIgate 9393 



A. B. Thomson 



2229 CLUB 



One of the Largest Tavern Dance Floors in Oakland 

COCKTAILS - DANCING 

2229 BROADWAY OAKLAND, CALIF. 



TEmplebar 7995 



ROBIN HOOD INN 

FINE AMERICAN COOKING 
PRIVATE BANQUET ROOMS 



55 GRAND AVENUE 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



HIgate 9701 



FENNER FULLER'S 
Luncheons - Dinners 



604 GRAND AVENUE 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone TEmplebar 3 786 



G. Nickolas Geo. K. Tzugaris 



GEO. TZUGARIS & CO. 

GROWERS AND SHIPPERS 
CITRUS FRUITS & PRODUCE— WHOLESALE 



435-437 SECOND STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Page 66 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 1945 



advance to the universities, about double the usual num- 
ber. 

When Pearl Harbor was attacked there was the im- 
mediate menace of Japanese bombs on the Pacific Coast 
with possible panic and disorder. Instantly the Auxiliary 
Police became the nucleus of a much larger organization 
of volunteers. All were given the 20 hours of First Aid 
and 13 hours of gas and bomb instruction of the OCD. 
Seventy-two, remaining as a permanent force, have re- 
ceived a complete course of police training in patrol, traf- 
fic, report writing, observation, presentation of evidence 
and the law of arrest, the same as given to a "rookie cop", 
including pistol practice on the range. In addition, they 
have had intensive training in American ju-jitsu and 
many have taken advanced lessons. They are completely 
uniformed and equipped without a dollar of expense to 
the city — in fact, the existence of this force has probably 
saved the citizens a great deal of money without any evi- 
dence of it on their tax bills. 

They now meet every two weeks, hear a lecture or see 
a police moving picture and then after a few minutes 
of calisthenics practice ju-jitsu. In rotation they ride the 
patrol cars with the regular police officers. By day they 
are solid, responsible citizens, many of them in high posi- 
tions. Nearly all of them have been Boy Scouts. In fact, 
at the time of the strike there were exactly 12 boys in 
the city of 10,000 who were not Scouts. By night or any 
other time they are needed they are a compact, efficient 
force of trained officers and they love it. There is no con- 
flict with the duties of the regular officers. They are re- 
peatedly told that except when on active duty they have 
only the powers of any other private citizen and that 
their acts "will at all times be subject to the scrutiny of 
an observant public". 

After seeing what they can do, I am not going to 
argue with any of them if they tell me to come along 
quietly. I know that I am going whether I like it or not. 



TRin.dad 1872 

Rent a Trailer from C. A. Anderson 

TRAILERS MADE, SOLD AND RENTED 



785 7 MacARTHUR BOULEVARD 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone KEUog 2-1833 



E. C. Swingle. Prop. 



ED'S AUTO PARTS 

Cash for Cars in Any Condition 
Open Sundays 1 to 3 P. M. 

AUTO GLASS INSTALLED - NEW AND USED AUTO PARTS 



Shop Phone TRinidad 2882 

JOHNSTON AUTO REPAIR 

GENERAL AUTOMOBILE REPAIRING 
EXPERT IGNITION WORK 

6001 FOOTHILL BL\D. OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone: Piedmont 2644 



Res. TEmplebar 15 74 



BRYAN HAMMOND 

REAL ESTATE - INSURANCE 
Exchange a Specialty 

3810 BROADWA"!' OAKLAND. CALIF. 



WALT'S 405 CLUB 

405 12th STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 

THE ROSE ROOM BALLROOM 



43 1 12th STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Telephone 6 1 



Res. Phone 1579-J 



BLUE RIBBON CAFE 

Regular Meals and Short Orders - China Meals 
GOOD FOOD 



109 PARK PLACE 



RICHMOND, CALIF. 



C. O. SOLLOM 



TAMALPAIS MOTOR SALES 
Select Used Cars 

78 E. BLYTHEDALE AVE. MILL VALLEY. CALIF. 



Phone San Anselmo 395 7 



Free Estimates 



STERLING MERCHANDISE MART 



J. J. ONGARO 



GENERAL CONTRACTOR 



GROCERIES and COLD MEATS 

THIRD and CUTTING BOULEVARD RICHMOND. CALIF. No. I GARDEN ROAD 



Road Construction, Excavating, Grading 
Sanitary Sewers 



SAN ANSELMO. CALIF. 



Phone GArfield 4553 



H. P. Melnikow, Director 



ORIENTAL MARKET 

GROCERIES - FRUITS - VEGETABLES - TOBACCOS 

\^'hal you get is the Best — and Good Service 
Wait On You With a Smile 



NATIONAL LABOR BUREAU 

GENERAL ECONOMIC COUNSEL FOR LABOR UNIONS 



138 GEORGIA STREET 



VALLEJO. CALIF. 46 KEARNY STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



April, 1945 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 67 



PARKING ON GRADES 

Many motorists who bring their citations to the Legal 
Department of the National Automobile Club are sur- 
prised to learn that their citations are for improper parking 
on grades. Often the motorist thinks he has parked on level 
ground, or practically so, not realizing that he is liable to 
a citation for parking on a grade of more than three per 
cent. Much misunderstanding and grief could be avoided 
if motorists were familiar with code regulations governing 
parking on grades and some of the accidents which occur 
because of violations of the code. The traffic code reads 
that it shall be unlawful for an operator to stand or park 
any vehicle upon any perceptive grade without effectively 
setting the brakes thereon and blocking the wheels of said 
vehicle by turning them against the curb, or by other 
means. 

A three per cent grade, the minimum allowed, appears 
very slight, but cars have been known to "get away" even 
on very slight grades. Because of the close proximity of 
parking, a car may be bumped either front or rear, by an- 
other car which is pulling out from the curb. The bump 
may release the brakes of the parked car and send it, 
probably locked, careening down the street, leaving de- 
struction in its trail. Instances of accidents of this nature 
have been reported in areas which looked practically level. 

A run-away car may take pedestrians unaware at cross- 
ings, for they naturally will assume that the car has a 
driver and is going to stop. 



Phone RAndolph 5103 



Ed. Saliou 

BLACK LOAM and TOP SOIL 
FERTILIZER Wholesale & Retail 



199 SCHOOL STREET 
DALY CITY, CALIF. 



YOUR PEACETIME 
KITCHEN 

Plan Now For 

Complete Equipment, 

Convenient Arrangement, 

Adequate Wiring 

You homemakers should start plan- 
ning now . . . saving ideas . . . collecting 
unusual ideas and designs . . . making 
a scrapbook of all the convenient details 
that can be incorporated into your after- 
the-war kitchen. 

Careful, functional planning will as- 
sure that your peacetime kitchen will be 
convenient to work in. What is func- 
tional planning? It means working out 
the handiest possible arrangement of 
appliances and work areas, so that the 
various operations can be handled in 
easy and logical sequence. Such an ar- 
rangement will save time, steps, work 
and bother. 

Careful planning also includes ade- 
quate wiring — several electric circuits 
and numerous outlets in which to plug 
the appliances you now have and the 
new models you will buy after the war. 

Good lighting will also have a promi- 
nent part in your post-war kitchen. 
There probably will be a new fluorescent 
ceiling unit, plus local lighting at the 
range, sink and other work areas, in the 
cabinets and cupboards. 

Plan ahead now for a kitchen that 
will be beautiful in design, pleasant to 
work in and, above all, will make your 
daily chores a lot easier. 



Pacific GasandElectricCompany 

PJ CE li 445 



Page 68 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 1945 



FBI REPORTS CRIME TRENDS 

Reports received from 318 of the nation's larger cities 
showed the increases in various crime classifications as 
compared with 1942: rape, 9.7 per cent; burglary, 3.4 
per cent; auto theft, 11.5 per cent. Decreases were: mur- 
der, 12.3 per cent; negligent manslaughter, 10.3 per cent: 
aggravated assault, O.i per cent; robbery, 2.0 per cent; 
larceny, 10.6 per cent. These figures are revealed in Uni- 
form Crime Reports, annual bulletin for 1943, Volume 
XIV, Number 2, just released by the Federal Bureau of 
Investigation, under direction of Director J. Edgar Hoover. 

The pronounced auto theft increase of 11.'' per cent in 
1943 caused the figure to be 5.5 per cent over the pre-war 
average for 1939-41. This increase applied to all sections 
of the country except the Middle Atlantic, South Atlantic, 
and East South Central states. The continued increase in 
rapes during 1943 resulted in the figure being 21.9 per 
cent above the average for 1939-41. Other felonious as- 
saults last year were 7.1 per cent above the pre-war aver- 
age for 1939-41. Although burglaries increased 3.4 per 
cent over 1942, the figure is 10.2 per cent belov^- the aver- 
age for 1939-41. 

The average value of property stolen per offense showed 
substantial increases in 1943 as compared with 1942, as 
follows: robbery, 7.3 per cent: burglary, 21.7 per cent; 
larceny, 30.8 per cent; auto theft, 6.7 per cent. Although 
larcenies as a whole decreased in number, a 39.5 per cent 
increase occurred in pocket- picking and a 22.9 per cent 
increase in purse-snatching. Shoplifting showed a decrease 
of 6.2 per cent, and thefts of auto accessories decreased 
56.4 per cent. Daytime residence burglaries increased 7.2 
per cent, but nighttime residence burglaries declined 10.6 
per cent. 

The bulletin, which is illustrated with charts and tables, 
is invaluable to police administrators in comparing statistics 
and keeping abreast of national crime trends. It is sent 
without charge to law enforcement agencies contributing 
their monthly crime reports. 



Phone Richmond 2472 

USED CARS BOUGHT-SOLD-EXCHANGED 



R. E. GRYLICH 



AUTO SALES 
1422 MACDONALD AVENUE 



RICHMOND, CALIF. 



Phone Richmond 2420 



C. G. Steiner. Manager 



HOTEL CARQUINEZ 



TENTH STREET and NEX'IN AVE. 



RICHMOND. CALIF. 



Phone Richmond 238 



A. Shubat and G- Sindicich 



EAST RICHMOND GROCERY 

GROCERIES, FRUITS, VEGETABLES 
General Merchandise 



999 SAN P.ABLO AVE, 



RICHMOND. CALIF. 



Telephone KEIlog 2-9795 



Carl Athayde 



UNIQUE STEAK HOUSE 

WE SPECIALIZE IN STEAKS AND CHOPS 
THAT ARE COOKED RIGHT 

We Make Our Own Delicious Pies and Cakes 

432 1 MacARTHUR BLVD. OAKLAND, CALIF. 



HIgale 8540 



A. LEVY & J. ZENTNER CO. 

WHOLESALE FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 



THIRD and FRANKLIN STREETS 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Compliments of 



GLASER BROS 



ANDREW WILLIAMS STORE 



900 HARRISON STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



HOURS 7:00 A, M. to 1 P. M. . 
1900 SAN PABLO AVE. EL CERRITO. CALIF. 



PRospect 0181 



H. C. Sullivan 



HIgate 5330 



POINEER FABRICS CO. 



THE KAWNEER CO. 



2547 EIGHTH STREET 



BERKELEY. CALIF, 



AUTOMOTIVE AND FURNITURE FABRICS 
UPHOLSTERING SUPPLIES 

Distrib. Columbus Coated Fabrics, Landers Corp., Southern Mills 



1401 S. Los Angeles Street 
LOS ANGELES 



2428 Webster Street 
O.AKLAND 



TRinidad 3000 



F, W. Copp 



LADIES' and CHILDREN'S QUALITY APPAREL 
INFANTS' WEAR — "Everything but the Baby" 



GIAMBASTIANI HOG COMPANY 



DALY CITY, CALIFORNIA 



THE FRANCES SHOP 

"Neighborhood Convenience at Downtown Prices" 
3 77U FOOTHILL. I block west of Seminary Ave.. OAKLAND 



April. J 945 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 69 



Phone TRinidad 76 76 



McGUIRE AND HESTER 



PIPE LINE CONTRACTORS 



796 66th AVENUE 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



California Builders Supply Co., Ltd. 

Everything in the Building Line 
700 6th STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 



GREETINGS FROM 



Phone Hlgate 1768-1771 



G. Bonora Wine and Liquor Company 

G. BONORA WHOLESALE PRODUCE COMPANY 

400-420 FRANKLIN STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 



LORIMER DIESEL ENGINE CO. 

Marine Diesel Engines - Stationary Diesel Engines 

SIXTEENTH and WOOD STREETS OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone CLencourt 2994 



EAST BAY BOWL 

DUCK PIN BOWLING AND FOUNTAIN LUNCH 
ALSO AMUSEMENT MACHINES 



617 BROADWAY 



CENTRAL CALIFORNIA PRODUCERS 

DISTRIBUTORS OF ORANGES, LEMONS, GRAPEFRUIT 

OAKLAND, CALIF. 380 THIRD STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 



KEIIog 2-9743 



J. V. Maloy Telephone TWinoaks 2363 



J. V.'S. 



p. 8c. N. PRODUCE CO. 



DINING - COCKTAILS 

2045 MacARTHUR BLVD. 



WHOLESALE FRUIT & PRODUCE 

OAKLAND 2 i°' FRANKLIN STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone OLympic 442 1 



Phone TWinoaks 4 180 



Felix Cohen 



East Bay Refrigerator and Fixture Co. 

•Commercial Refrigerators and Refrigerator Display Counters 
Detail Arrangements of Fixtures and Estimates Furnished 
Walk-in Coolers, Porcelain Enamel Store Interiors, Exteriors 



SUBTROPICAL SALES CO. 

AVOCADOS - LIMES - TROPICAL FRUITS - PRODUCE 



941 AILEEN STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. "0 FRANKLIN STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



BUY WAR BONDS 
AND STAMPS 



EAST SHORE MARKET 

BEER - WINES - MEATS - GROCERIES 
Let Us Serve You 



1036 So. 47th STREET 



RICHMOND. CALIF. 



LAndscape 5-3993 



Phone CLencourt 5473 

EAST BAY DISTRIBUTING CO. 

New Owner: J. F. (Pat) Patterson 

Distributors SICK'S BEER - TECATE BEER 

Majestic Mixes — Soft Drinks 

22 11 UNION STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Telephone TE 4004 

OTT'S AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE 

TUNE UP - BRAKES - TIRES - AUTO SUPPLIES 
20th and WEBSTER STREETS 



Phone Piedmont 1 103 



OAKLAND 



Felix Croce 



VEE CLUB 



CROCE'S ROMA RESTAURANT 

REAL ITALIAN DINNERS AND COCKTAIL BAR 



3 33 SAN PABLO AVENUE 



EL CERRITO, CALIF. 5036 TELEGRAPH AVE., 495 5 1st STREET, OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Page 10 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL April, 1945 



Phone: 158 S. Eliades. Proprietor 



SUPERIOR LAUNDRY AMERICAN HOG COMPANY 

A GOOD LAUNDRY 

r,. ,^,o^^ ^...^ 198 MOLTKE STREET COLMA, CALIF. 

8 GRAND AVENUE SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Phone 1464 SAM - ROSE 



THE DERBY SANITARY HOG COMPANY 

127 WERNER AVENUE DALY CITY, CALIF. 

241 GRAND AVENUE SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



H. C. LITTLE BURNER CO., INC. 

^, ' PINE GROVE HOG COMPANY 

Domestic Oil-Burning Heating Equipment - Floor Furnaces 

"Cottage" Units - Circulating Heaters - Furnace Burner Units 

"Utility" Units and Type AC Units for Winter Air- 

Conditioning ■ Conversion Burners - Aquatherm 

"30" and "60" - Domestic Water Heaters ,,4 BISMARK STREET DALY CITY. CALIF. 

SAN RAFAEL CALIFORNIA 



Phone Larkspur 400 p^^„^ JUniper 4-7533 

OLCESE BROTHERS HOG CO. 



BLUE ROCK HOTEL 

Louise H. Nixon, Proprietor 



Cocktai] Bar - Luncheons - Dinners - Banquets 

LARKSPUR CALIFORNIA COLMA, SAN MATEO COUNTY CALIFORNIA 



Phone Larkspur 300 E. H. Anderson 

Phone Larkspur 672 

LARKSPUR GARAGE MARIE'S TAVERN 

EXPERT AUTO REPAIRING ^^^^^ ^^^^ ^^,^^^3 ^^^^ ^^ ^^^ ^^^ ^^^^^ 

LARK.SPUR CALIFORNIA LARKSPUR CALIF. 



Tel. San Rafael 636 F. P. GRADY, President 

LUCAS VALLEY DAIRY COCA COLA BOTTLING CO. 

The Milk With That Good Guernsey Flavor 

728 IRWIN STREET SAN RAFAEL. CALIF. 

32 IDA STREET SAN RAFAEL. CALIF. 



Phones 1260 and 1386 First-CIass Meals Served 

Phone SA 187 

TAMALPAIS HOTEL FAIRFAX FOUNTAIN LUNCH 

Ghiringhelli & Co., Proprietors 

Serving 

4th ST. and TAMALPAIS AVE. SAN RAFAEL. CALIF BREAKFAST - LUNCH - DINNER 



Compliments of 

ROSSI'S FAIRFAX TAVERN 
W. & J. SLOANE CO. 

GOOD SERVICE 

224 SUTTER STREET SAN FRANCISCO 184 BOLINAS ROAD FAIRFAX, CALIF. 



April, 1945 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 7 J 



THE OFFICIAL BADGE 

This badge is the mark hy which you can identify a 
guest of San Francisco. 

Every delegate, official and newsman accredited to the 



NATIONAL DOLLAR STORES 

THREE STORES IN SAN FRANCISCO: 

92 9 MARKET STREET— Phone EXbrook 33 7 1 

26 10 MISSION STREET — Phone ATwater 205 7 

1637 FILLMORE STREET— Phone Fillmore 5310 




United Nations Conference on International Organization 
wears one of these blue-gray, official badges. 

They are one inch in diameter, circular and depict a 
globe and an olive branch. The rim of the circle is trimmed 
in gold and white. 

Phone S R 43 7 

NORTH BAY ELECTRIC WORKS 



535 FRANCISCO BLVD. 



SAN RAFAEL, CALIF. 



ROSEBOWL CHATEAU 



LARKSPUR, CALIFORNIA 



GREEN VALLEY NURSERY 

COLMA. CALIFORNIA 

NEW CALIFORNIA HOG COMPANY 



7338 MISSION STREET 



DALY CITY, CALIF. 



Telephone RAndolph 5858 

MISSION AUTO COURT 

A good place to stay while visiting 
SAN FRANCISCO 

6843 MISSION STREET (U. S. 101) DALY CITY, CALIF. 

Phone South City 1475 

While trying our drinks review the collection of old fight pictures 

ALPHONSO'S 

LAST PLACE TO QUENCH YOUR 
THIRST IN THE NEXT 30 MILES 

BAYSHORE HIGHWAY & GRAND AVE. SO. SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone 6000 

UNITED AMBULANCE COMPANY 

MEDICAL GASES - SICK ROOM SUPPLIES 
SAN RAFAEL CALIFORNIA 

Phone South S. F. 1460 Angelo Genovesj 

206 BANK CLUB 

THE FINEST LIQUORS AND GOOD FOOD 
. . ROOMS . , 

206 GRAND AVENUE SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



PACIFIC SHOE COMPANY 



45 1 WASHINGTON STREET 



SAN FR.'XNCISCO 



WE 1527 



S. WEINSTEIN GROCERY 



2300 SUTTER STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



1790 JACKSON APARTMENTS 

SAN FRANCISCO 
Phone EXbrook 9846 

EARNIE'S RESTAURANT 

In the Heart of San Francisco's Bohemia 

847 MONTGOMERY STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone EXbrook 7348 PIN MONEY TERMS 

BROOKS 

CAMERAS 

1048 MARKET ST.; 56 KEARNY ST. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



KARL'S KUSTOM MADE SHOES 



152 7 FILLMORE STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 15 



ORdway 9815 



MUNY BAIT SHOP 



3098 POLK STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



New York - San Francisco - Chicago 

EVERSHARP, Inc. 

REPEATING PENCILS - PENS - DESK SETS - RED TOP LEADS 

TUNE IN 

TAKE IT OR LEAVE IT— SUNDAY NIGHTS 

LET YOURSELF GO— WEDNESDAY NIGHTS— KQW 



PRospect 9940 



A- 1 MARKET 



800 POST STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone ORdway 2358 

DONG'S CAFE 

LUNCHEON - DINNER 
AMERICAN AND CHINESE DISHES 

124 7 POLK STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



Phones: Business UNderhill 9048 



Residence UNderhill 785 1 



MIAMI BUFFET 



LAURA and BILLY 
17th at FLORIDA STREETS 



SAN FRANCISCO 



JOHN C. WITT AND SON 
DAIRY 

COLMA, CALIFORNIA 



SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO HOSPITAL 



SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone 195 7 



JOYLAND ARCADE 



STANDARD HOG COMPANY 



226 GRAND AVENUE 



SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



1555 PALOU AVENUE 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Page 72 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 1945 



1 San Francisco- 




Esl PEACE OFFICERS' 

JOPMIM 



(Copyright, 1931, 2-0 Publishing Co.) 
Founded 1922 

Business Office: 465 Tenth Street 

San Francisco, California 

Phone MArket 7110 

An Official Police News and Educational Magazine Devoted 
to the Interests of 

SAN FRANCISCO POLICE DEPARTMENT 
WIDOWS' AND ORPHANS' AID ASSOCIATION 
BAY COUNTIES' PEACE OFFICERS' ASSOOATION 
PENINSULA POLICE OFFICERS' ASSOCIATION 
NORTHERN CALIFORNIA POLICE COMMUNICA 
TION OFFICERS' ASSOCIATION 

Published Monthly by 

San Francisco Police and Peace Officers' Journal 

S. F. Police Short Wave Radio Call KGPD 

OUR FOREIGN EXCHANGES 

THE GARDA REVIEW 2 Crow St., Dublin, Ireland 

ALERTA, A. V. JUAREZ Desp. 6, Mexico, D. F. 

RE VISTA DE POLICIA 

Rioja, 666, Buenos Aires, Republic of Argentine, S. A. 

CONSTABULARY GAZETTE Belfast, Ireland 

POLICE NEWS New South Wales 

POLICE JOURNAL Wellington, New Zealand 

Make All Checks Payable to San Francisco Police Journal 

OPIE L. WARNER Business Manager and Editor 

SUBSCRIPTION TERMS — $3 a year, payable in advance; 2Sc 
a number. In Canada, $4 a year. Renittance must be made 
by Post Office or Express Money Order, by Registered Letter, 
or by Postage Stamps of 2-cent denomination, or by check. 

IMPORTANT NOTICE— Do not subscribe to S. F. POLICE 
JOURNAL through agents unknown to you personally, or 
who cannot present proper credentials on our stationery. 

ADVERTISING RATES on application. 30 " 



NAZI "SECURITY POLICE" 
NEEDS PROTECTION 

Police General Walter Rauter, German Commissioner- 
General for Public Safety in Nazi-occupied Holland, is a 
much-harried man. Beside his constant struggle against the 
Dutch underground and his vigilance against raids on 
rationing bureaus and food distribution centers, he is beset 
with worries about the safety of his henchmen, the police 
president in Holland's larger cities, many of whom have 
been "liquidated" by patriots. Afraid lest soon there will 
be no Dutch-Nazis left to fill the vacant posts, Rauter has 
ordered that henceforth no police president be allowed to 
show himself in public unless he is accompanied by two 
armed bodyguards, Je Maintiendrai, the secret Dutch 
newspaper, reported recently. 

Holland's movie houses are another source of worry for 
the German police head. There have been a large number 
of fires recently in these places of amusement, most of them 
caused by incendiary bombs which had been left under 
seats by patriots. So now Rauter has issued a decree that 
all movie theatres must be searched for such bombs after 
each performance and during intermissions. 

Rauter is also concerned over the thousands of radio sets 
which the Nazis confiscated last year from the Dutch, and 
which heretofore were stored in local warehouses. There 



have been many raids on these warehouses lately, each of 
which resulted in the disappearance of large quantities of 
requisitioned radio sets. To diminish the chance of further 
disappearances, Rauter has ordered that all radio sets be 
transferred to one city where his men can keep a better 
eye on them. 



LOCK YOUR CAR TO FOIL THEFT 

When you park your car — even for a minute or two 
— take the ignition keys with you! Lock the ignition and 
doors of your car except when you park in public park- 
ing lots or garages. 

This warning was issued by the California State Auto- 
mobile Association as reports disclose car thefts are on 
the increase. 

Auto theft statistics show that in 90 per cent of the 
cases, the motorist had left the keys in the car reported 
stolen. 

Co-operation of the public in suppressing car thefts 
has been urged as a necessity — unless you don't mind if 
someone without permission takes your vehicle out for a 
spin and burns up all your precious gasoline. A vast ma- 
jority of stolen cars are recovered later, found abancloned 
when the gas gauge indicated the fuel tank was empty. 

With thefts of auto accessories also reported increasing, 
the Automobile Association warns motorists further to 
avoid parking at night in darkened streets and alleyways. 



NEW F. B. I. TELEPHONE NUMBER 

N. J. L. Pieper, agent in charge of the San Francisco 
office of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, announces 
a change in the telephone number of his headquarters in 
the building at 111 Sutter Street, San Francisco. The 
new number is SUtter 6367. 



Captain Aloysious O'Brien of the Northern Station says 
that, while he has never been down in the Southern states, 
as has Captain Alex McDaniel of the Southern Station, he 
bets he can dig up more cotton pickers in the Northern Dis- 
trict than Captain McDaniel can locate in the Southern 
District. 

Phone 3898 



Gino Baldocchi 



STATES TAVERN 



FINE WINES AND LIQUORS 
Meals Served 12 to 1 and 6 to 7 P. M. 

Fred Martinelli, Chef 
200 Grand AVENUE SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Telephone S. A. 3868 



G. Giorgi 



NEW FAIRFAX BAKERY 



WONDERFUL BREAD. MACHINE MADE AND WRAPPED 

Cakes and Pastries 

1900 SIR FRANCIS DRAKE BLVD. FAIRFAX. CALIF. 

Phone 1605 

CHARLIE'S PLACE 

BEER - WINE and LIQUORS 
907 IRWIN STREET SAN RAFAEL, CALIF. 

Beautifully Made Little "Peasant Sets" For Tiny Boys and Girls 

TRUDE OF CALIFORNIA 

130 SUTTER STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



April, 1945 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 73 



Phone GLencourt 1330 



ANGELI BROS., Inc. 

WHOLESALE PRODUCE 



220-222 FRANKLIN STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



KEllog 4-14 12 



Louis (Fred) Vermillion 
Frank Levrero 



CALIENTE CAFE 

HOME OF SIZZLING STEAKS - COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

1340 EAST TWELFTH STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 

Phone KEllog 2-0200 

A. L. FONTANA CAFE 

WINE - BEER - LIQUORS AND TOBACCO 

1501 THIRTEENTH AVENUE OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Phone KEllog 3-3883 Roy E. Daughters 

ROY'S 

TIRE AND BATTERY SERVICE 
Recapping and Repairing - New Tires and Tubes - National Batteries 
1248 HIGH STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Phone TRinidad 1228 We Buy and Sell 

HARRY HALS BARGAIN STORE 

"We Sell at Rock Bottom Prices" 

FURNITURE - LINOLEUM - MATTRESSES - GAS STOVES 

HOUSEHOLD GOODS, ETC. 

7804 EAST 14TH STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Phone KEllog 2-9126 William Tama, Mgr. 

BETTER SERVICE 

CLEANING AND DYEING 
Quality Work - We Call and Deliver 



1926 23rd AVENUE 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone TRinidad 6000 

BOORMAN LUMBER CO. 



1003 5 EAST FOURTEENTH STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Telephone GLencourt 3000 



GEORGE WALLING 

BEE LINE TRUCK DISPATCH 



2713 SAN PABLO AVENUE 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Telephone Piedmont 3 101 

SAN PABLO AUTO WRECKING CO. 

NEW AND USED GLASS 
New and Used Parts Department - Transmissions and Rear Ends 



3291 SAN PABLO AVENUE 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone TEmplebar 8139 - If No Answer Call OLympic 5482 

OAKLAND CASKET COMPANY 

QUALITY :-: SERVICE 

2842 ADELINE STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 

Hospital: KEllog 2-9172 Residence: KEllog 4-5202 

DR. E. A. RODIER 

DOG AND CAT SPECIALIST 



3561 FOOTHILL BOULEVARD 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone TEmplebar 704 1 



Residence: TRinidad 2086 



RAY N. CANN 

BODY AND FENDER REPAIRING - PAINTING 
TOPS AND UPHOLSTERY 

437 25TH STREET 



OAKLAND CANNING COMPANY 

Packers of 
CANNED FRUIT and VEGETABLES 

FOOT OF NINTH AVENUE OAKLAND. CALIF. 

Phone ANdover 6973 H. A. Tessien E. A. Fnedrichsen 



KEY SERVICE 

Motor Rebulders - General Repairs 

35 18 35th AVENUE OAKLAND. CALIF. 

Phone KEllog 3-5565 

KAY CHESTERFIELD MFG. CO. 



5434 EAST 14th STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



KEUogg 2-8966 



CABINETS by JOSEPHS BROTHERS 

SPECIAL MILL WORK 
Store - Office - BuMt-In Fixtures 

501 29th AVENUE OAKLAND, CALIF. 



BOYERTOWN 



KE 2-9883 JIM RICH 

Fords - Dodges - Chevro!ets - Da Sotos 

Cars Bought and Sold 

M 8C R MOTORS 

USED CARS WITH A REPUTATION 

2 138 EAST 14th STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 

2222 EAST- 14th STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phones: Office. KEllog 2-677 1 



Res., KEllog 2-3750 



HENRY A. PLEITNER Co. 

NOTARY PUBLIC 
REAL ESTATE LOANS & INSURANCE 

4021 EAST 14th STREET OAKLAND. CA'JF. 



Phone KE 2-9293 



4301 EAST 14th STREET 



HI 14 CAFE 

PACKAGE GOODS 

LON. FRANK and NICK 



LONNIE CALYEN 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Telephone VAlencia 2560 



Telephone KEllog 24866 



ECONOMY BY-PRODUCTS CO., INC. 



SAN FRANCISCO BRANCH 
782 MINNESOTA STREET 



OAKLAND BRANCH 
4200 ALAMEDA AVE. 



Phone KEllog 3-1432 

IDEAL CABINET SHOP 

JOAQUIN FERRY. Owner 

1010 38th AVENUE OAKLAND 1 .CALIF. 

KEllog 2-9409 Open Day and Night 

OLD PERK RESTAURANT 

ON FRUITVALE AVENUE 

1416 FRUITVALE AVENUE OAKLAND. CALIF. 

TEmplebar 8364 

SWAN PHARMACY 

SPECIALISTS IN HERBS AND HERB REMEDIES 
FOR 50 YEARS 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 547 EIGHTH STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone GLencourt 9856 



James Fay TWinoaks 272 7 



MERRITT UPHOLSTERING CO. 

FURNITURE MADE TO ORDER 
Refinishinil and Repairing - Antiques For Sale 



ABE COHN 

WHOLESALE BEVERAGES 



1223 FIRST AVENUE 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



363 SECOND STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone KEllog 2-8161 

OAKLAND FORGE & TOOL WORKS 



1836 E. 12TH STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



GLencourt 9708 

STANDARD STOVE CO. 

STOVES - REFRIGERATORS - WASHERS 

233 BROADWAY, COR, THIRD OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Page 74 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 1945 



WHITE MILL 

GOOD FOOD - GOOD SERVICE - REASONABLE PRICES 

52 THROCKMORTON AN'ENUE MILL VALLEY, CALIF. 



Phone San Anselmo 2824 



KENTFIELD DRUGS 



KENTFIELD, CALIFORN 



RED HILL LIQUOR STORES 

ALL KINDS OF LIQUORS 

67 THROCKMORTON AVENUE MILL VALLEY. CALIF. 

MEET THE QUINN'S 

MILL VALLEY'S POPULAR RENDEZVOUS 
Bar Service - Wines and Liquors 

153 THROCKMORTON AVE. 2 CORTE MADERA AVE 

Phone 740 Phon^ 717 



overland 4333 



"Everything for th2 Garden" 



CHRISTENSEN NURSERY CO. 

COMPLETE GARDEN AND LANDSCAPE SERVICE 
343 WEST PORTAL AVE. SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Telephone BAyview 4501 

BENJAMIN EDLIN 

LICENSED REAL ESTATE BROKER 



2448 CLEMENT STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF 



G^^aystonc 3838 

EAGLE TAXI COMPANY 

TAYLO?! AND PACIFIC STREETS SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Phone TEmplibar 4916 



Dr. A. E. Slagerman, Mgr. 



DR. J. A. CAMPBELL 

DENTISTS 



490 THIRTEENTH STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone TEmpIebar 8159 



Warehouse Facilities - Side Track 



OVERSEAS PACKING COMPANY 

Packing to Conform with Army and Navy Specifications 
526 THIRD STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 

Telephone ANdover 4 784 Louise Diefenbach. Prop. 

DIMOND DELICATESSEN 

HOME COOKED FOODS AND SALADS 
Steam Table - Liquor - Imported Delicacies 

2129 MacARTHUR BOULEVARD O.AKLAND, CALIF. 



Business Phone: KEIlog 2-9746 



J. C. Men-zes, Prop. 



LIDO CAFE 

REFRESHMENTS - FINEST WINES AND BOTTLED BEER 
Come In and See Miniature of Bay Bridge 

1800 EAST 14TH STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Phone HIghgate 8040 

M E D L Y N • S 

BUTTER-KIST SHOPPE 

FOUNTAIN - SANDWICHES - BEER 

117 EAST 12TH STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phon-s: HIgate 4547 - HIgate 4548 



N. Pepetone, Prop, 



PACIFIC FISH COMPANY 

EXCLUSIVE WHOLESALE DEALERS 
306 BROADWAY OAKLAND, CALIF 

Phone TWinoaks 1810 Open 9 to 6 Daily, Sundays I 1 to 6 

BIG HEARTED 

BILL HARDEN 

RAILWAY AND STEAMSHIP - FURNITURE WAREHOUSE 

"The Big Red Buldng" 

FIFTH AND GROVE STREETS OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone Mill Valley 300 M. D. Murphy 

THE MEN'S SHOP 

Latest Styles For the Well-Dressed Man 

82 THROCKMORTON AVENUE MILL VALLEY. CALIF. 



Telephone Mill Valley 442 



( Vic ) Partenheimer 



WASHING MACHINE REPAIR COMPANY 

WE REPAIR WASHERS AND VACUUM CLEANERS 
AND ALL ELECTRICAL APPLIANCES 

MILLER AND MONTFORD .AVENUES MILL V.ALLEY, CALIF. 

Phon3 Mill Valley 55 

RUSSELL GARAGE 

Mrs. James Russell . . . Authorized Dealer "BUICK" 
Bendix Home Laundry - Norge Products 



18 E. BLITHEDALE AVENUE 



MILL VALLEY. CALIF. 



Phone Mill Valley 1444 

THE BROTHERS TAVERN 

FRED BERICK 

8 LOCUST AVENUE MILL VALLEY. CALIF. 



Phone Mill Valley 259 

MILL VALLEY LUMBER CO., Inc. 

S. F. ELKINS, Vice President 
MILL V .A L L E ")■ . CALIFORNIA 



Telephone Mill Valley 1690 



Bob M:yer. Prop 



MEYER PLUMBING COMPANY 

"FO."? HEALTH AND GOOD LIVING ' 

32 MILLER AVENUE MILL VALLEY. CALIF. 

Phone Mill Vall.y 1 144 

SUEY KEE & CO. 

GROCERIES, FRUITS, VEGETABLES, MEATS, 
FiSH AND POULTRY 



4 1. 43 THROCKMORTON AVENUE 



MILL VALLEY, CALIF. 



Phones: Grocery Dept.. 540 - Meat Dept.. 270 

MILL VALLEY FOOD STORE 

Staple and Fancy Groceries, Wines, Liquors, Meats, Poultry, 
Fish, Fruits and Vegetables 

108 THROCKMORTON AVENUE MILL VALLEY, CALIF. 



NITE HAWK CAFE 

EXCELLENT FOOD - REASONABLE PRICES 

611 BRIDCEWAY AVENUE SAUSALITO, CALIF. 

LOCUST FOOD MART 

GROCERY DEPT. - MEAT DEPT. - VEGETABLE DEPT. 
The Best of Everything at Reasonable Prices 

"In the Center of the Locust Shopping District" 
357 MILLER AVENUE MILL VALLEY, CALIF. 

THE HOUSE OF JOY 

WINE - BEER - LIQUORS 

TIBURON, CALIFORNIA 
Telephone Mill Valley 5 

HASTY TASTY CAFE 

GOOD FOOD 

639 BRIDCEWAY AVE. SAUSALITO. CALIF. 

PASTIME CLUB 

. . DANCING EVERY NIGHT . . . 
TAMALPAIS JUNCTION MILL VALLEY, CALIF. 

Phone Mill Valley 5 2 

WARD'S TAXI CO. 

S. W. WARD. Prop. 
MILL VALLEY. CALIFORNIA 



April, 194S 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



Page 75- 



SAUSALITO CRIME FREE 

(Continued from page 15 ) 

of Sergeant French, has picked up scores of men wanted 
in other jurisdictions. Citing a few, gives an idea how 
thorough the bureau works. A soldier stole an airplane 
from a Texas airfield, flew toward California, cracked 
up, escaped from the wreckage and continued on his way 
the best he could. He arrived in Sausalito, and hadn't 
been in the town long enough to enjoy its scenic attrac- 
tions, when the police had him in custody. 

Then there was the man from Missouri who had stab- 
bed a fellow being to death in Kansas City. He made the 
mistake of coming to Sausalito, for he was picked up 
shortly after landing in that city, after getting a job at 
Marinship. 

Chief Doyle grabbed a witness wanted by the San 
Francisco Police Department as an important witness in 
the Cecil murder case. The man had packed up all his 
personal belongings and with over $400 in his pockets 
was ready to leave for Oklahoma when Chief Doyle 
swooped down on him and held him for the Homicide 
Detail of the San Francisco Police Department, who took 
over in half an hour after the witness was interrupted 
in his leave-taking. 

Another example of cooperation extended by the Saus- 
alito Police Department was the recovery of two auto- 
mobiles stolen in San Francisco before the Police De- 
partment of that city had been advised of their theft. 
One recovery was made when Chief Doyle arrested a 
soldier for driving while intoxicated, and the soldier told 
him he had stolen the car from in front of the Palace 
Hotel. 

The first rape to occur in years was quickly solved by 
the arrest of a 2 5 -year-old shipyard worker. He followed 
a young woman off a 10 o'clock bus from Mill Valley 
to Prospect Drive, forced her into the bushes and crim- 
inally attacked her. Though he had her clothes stripped 
from her body, she made her way to the highway and 
some sailors and soldiers came along in a car, gave her 
covering, then went to the scene of the attack, then to 
the ticket station on the Golden Gate Bridge, where the 
Sausalito Police Department was notified. A search was 
made for the suspect, a good description of whom, given 
by the victim, resulted in the arrest of the man in less 
than an hour after his crime. He declared he remem- 
bered nothing from 12 midnight to the time of his arrest; 
that he was at midnight in Sausalito. But Chief Doyle 
was able to find that he left Mill Valley at 12:50, had 
an argument with the bus driver, and got off at the trans- 
fer point outside of Sausalito. The man was booked and 
held to answer on a rape charge. 

To cinch evidence against the man, his clothes, shoes, 
together with samples of the earth where the assault took 
place, were sent to the FBI laboratories in Washington, 
and the report comes back that the soil on the shoes and 
clothes are the same as that scooped up in the area of 
the attack. 

Beside Sergeant French, who is a native of Oakland, 
another addition has been made to the Department dur- 



COMPLIMENTS 

MORRIS WELDING WORKS 

964 1 SAN LEANDRO BOULEVARD SAN LEANDRO, CALIF. 



Telephone Piedmont 92 5 9 



Sam Olson 



CORONA CLUB 



A SWELL PLACE TO LOAF AND PLAY CARDS 
Draw - Pan - Low Ball - Pinochle, Etc. 



4069 SAN PABLO AVE. 



EMERYVILLE. CALIF. 



ALBERTS STORE 

SAN ANSELMO, CALIF. 



Phone 5 060 



CAIN & JOMASEN TIRE SERVICE 

RE-TREADING :-: RE-CAPPING 



20 GREENFIELD AVENUE 



SAN ANSELMO. CALIF. 



Opposite Firehouse 



Arthur W. Smith, Prop. 



BEN FRANKLIN STORE 

VARIETY MERCHANDISE - 5c - 10c - 15c AND UP 

SAN ANSELMO, CALIFORNIA 



PAUL'S 

1025 FOURTH STREET SAN RAFAEL, CALIF. 



Phone San Rafael 600 



Russ Warden, Own^r 



GROSJEAN & CO. 



GROCERIES, FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 
*'fhe Oldest Grocer in California" 

1221 - 1223 FOURTH STREET SAN RAFAEL, CALIF. 

Phones: 252 or 4305 Established 1880 

DUFFY BROS. 

LINCOLN AVENUE GARAGE - OPEN DAY AND NIGHT 
Tires and Accessories - District Goodyear Tire Co. 

9 13 LINCOLN AVENUE SAN RAFAEL, CALIF. 



Phone 14 14 



P. Cabrol 



SAN RAFAEL FRENCH CLEANERS 

Fancy Garments - Suits - Oriental Rugs - Carpets 

Cleaned, Dyed and Repaired 

1832 FOURTH STREET SAN RAFAEL. CALIF. 



SPROUSE-REITZ CO., INC. 

5c - 10c - 15c STORE 

133 7 - 39 FOURTH STREET SAN RAFAEL. CALIF. 



Phone 664 



Minnie Silva - Marie Pacheco 



MINNIE'S ALTERATION SHOP 

CLEANING AND PRESSING - "QUALITY SERVICE" 
Men's and Ladies' Altering 

905 B STREET SAN RAFAEL. CALIF. 

Telephone San Anselmo 4381 

BUD'S LOUNGE 

"COCKTAILS" 
SAN ANSELMO CALIFORNIA 

Telephone 7 77 

VAN DER MAELEN 

CLEANING AND DYEING WORKS 
Qualty Work - Good Service 

2 138 FOURTH STREET SAN RAFAEL. CALIF. 

Telephone San .Anselmo 5686 Donald C. Perry 

SUNNYSIDE NURSERY 

HOME OF DISTINCTIVE PLANTS. SPRAYS, FERTILIZERS AND 
GARDEN SUPPLIES 



130 SIR FRANCIS DR.AKE BLVD. 



SAN ANSELMO. CALIF. 



Page 76 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 1945 



ing the past year. It is the appointment of Mrs. Wilma 
Young as matron. She was appointed last August, and 
Chief Doyle says she has picked up the ideas of her duties 
in a manner that few of the men folks he has given a 
chance have been able to equal. 

In addition to the regular force at his command, Chief 
Doyle has six men detailed at the Marin City dormitories. 

He and his officers make it a business to stop every 
stranger who appears on the streets of the city after dark 
and ask him for credentials and advise the officer what 
the stranger is doing or intends to do. Right guys don't 
resent this being stopped, only those with an idea of pull- 
ing some job put up a kick, and men having such ideas 
and learning that they will be stopped lose a lot of en- 
thusiasm about going through with any intended crime. 



MORE ON MILL VALLEY 

(Continued from page 14) 

A. Absolutely. You must show that the first mar- 
riage was valid and still in existence, this necessitates 
proof that the first wife is alive. 

Q. Must the Arresting Officer be in Court for the 
Defendant's arraignment? 

A. It is not required. 

Q. Can a private person forcibly enter a house to 
make an arrest? 

A. Yes. If the Arrest is for a Felony. 

Q. A physician takes a vacation of two weeks from 
his practice; before going he writes several prescriptions 
for medicinal doses of narcotics. Post-dating them, he 
gives them to an addict patient — any crime? 

A. Yes. The Narcotic law expressly prohibits post- 
dated narcotic prescriptions. 

Q. A Detective consorting with underworld char- 
acters to secure evidence learns of a plot to rob a bank. 
He helps them to plan the robbery and other details, not 
actually participating in the holdup, of course. Other 
Officers arrest the two suspects in the commission of the 
act; is this entrapment? 

A. Yes. But legal entrapment if the Officer trails 
along merely to catch the robbers, the fact that the plan 
and intent originated with the robbers and not with the 
officer, relieves him of guilt. 

Q. A man steals a fur coat in Stockton and an Officer 
arrests him while he is attempting to pawn it in a Los 
Angeles pawnshop; is there more than one crime and 
what court has jurisdiction? 

A. Only one crime but the man can be prosecuted 
in either county. 

Q. Is it any crime if the Defendant in a criminal ac- 
tion attempts, or succeeds, in persuading witnesses not 
to appear and testify against him? 

A. Yes. A misdemeanor under Section 1?6 Penal 
Code. 

(To Be Continued) 



Phone HIgate <»30l -DO. DO BR.AND" 

GEORGE DELANES Sc CO. 

WHOLESALE FRUIT AND PRODUCE 
Potatoes - Onions - Green Vegetables 



•420 SECOND STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Shop: GLencourt 1616 



Residence: OLympic 3472 



BOB ROGERS AUTO REPAIRS 

(SYSTEM AUTO PARK) 

1941 FRANKLIN STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 

Phones: SWeetwood 3238. HAyward 1215M, HAyward 199\V 

SASO BROS. 

WHOLESALE PRODUCE 



424 FRANKLIN STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



ANdover 334 1 

WELD-RITE WELDING CO. 

K. A. Bui-ge, Res.. BE 65 70J - M. O. Scott. Res.. ANdover 8590 

1920 EAST 12TH STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 

Louis Brignoli and Frank M. Banks 

LE BANK CAFE 



22 3 5 TELEGRAPH .AVENUE 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone TEmplebar 9776 



Fred De Tore 



THE MID -WAY 



"THE BEST 4 - 5 & 10" 

Wines, Liquors and Beers - Tasty Sandwiches and S-Inch 

Hot Dogs w.th Works Five Cents 

8!5 WASHINGTON STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 



PACIFIC INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTS CO. 



801 JEFFERSON STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone LAndscape 5-992 7 



\ ic & .AI Figone 



THE OLD SIX BELLS 

Beer and Wines - Liquors - Dine and Dance 

CENTRAL and SAN PABLO AVE. EL CERRITO, CALIF. 



Phone HIgate 963 1 



MAJESTIC HOTEL 



1724 SAN PABLO AVENUE 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



TEmplebar 0845 - 0846 

LINCOLN-CHESTERFIELD MFG. CO. 

COMPLETE HOME FURNISHINGS 
"Factory to You" 

9 1 TWELFTH STREET. Opp. New Court House OAKLAND 

Telephone TEmplebar 696 1 

STERLING LUMBER CO. 



1617 - 32ND STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



GLencourt 5200 

ALBERT R. REINKE 

OPTOMETRIST 

1114 FRANKLIN BLDG. OAKLAND. CALIF. 

Phone S. A. 3 32 I 

MIMI'S INN 

BEER - WINE . . . COZY SPOT 

1625 SIR FRANCIS DRAKE BLVD. FAIRFAX. CALIF. 

COURT HOUSE CREAMERY 

WE SERVE GOOD FOOD AT ALL TIMES 
"Good Service" 



103 1 FOURTH STREET 



SAN RAFAEL. CALIF. 



Afinl, 1945 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 77 



CRACKER BOX 

"THE BUSINESS MAN'S RESTAURANT" 
2830 EAST FOURTEENTH STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 

KEllog 3-0422 

HAPPY HOBBY STABLES 

2923 MOU.NT.AIN BOULEVARD O.AKL.AND. CALIF. 



HIghgate 54 10 



PIEDMONT REALTY CO. 

PIEDMONT - LAKE DISTRICT HOMES 



582 GRAND .AVENUE 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



ANDREW CHRIST 



TRinidad 815 1 

OWL BAIT SHOP 

PETE MURPHY 

8870 MacARTHUR BOULEVARD OAKLAND. CALIF. 

Phone HIghgate 9596 

HOTEL FREMONT 

TUB AND SHOWER BATHS - STEAM HEAT 
524 EIGHTH STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 



BUY WAR BONDS 
AND STAMPS 



The Mutual Life Insurance Co. of New York 

419 BANK OF AMERICA BUILDING 

12 12 BROADWAY OAKLAND, CALIF. 

HIghgate 3305 

W. E. DANIEL 

DISTRIBUTOR FOR ACOUSTICON HEARING AIDS 



408 FOURTEENTH STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone HIghgate 3080 M. J. VAYSSIE, Manager 

HOTEL ROYAL 

A NEW STEEL FRAME, FIREPROOF HOTEL 

SAN PABLO at 20th STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone TEmpIebar 6223 

OAKLAND RADIO COMPANY 

REFRIGERATORS - WASHING MACHINES 
ELECTRICAL APPLIANCES SALES AND SERVICE 

2058 BROADWAY OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Phone HIghgate 1863 A. Tulanian, Mgr. 

PERSIAN RUG COMPANY 

ORIENTAL AND DOMESTIC RUGS 
Cleaning and Repairing 

372 1 GRAND AVENUE OAKLAND. CALIF. 

Phone Kellog 4-3071 

ROBINSON BROTHERS MORTUARY 

"A FRIENDLY PERSONAL SERVICE" 

1901 FRUITVALE AVENUE OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Phone KEllog 2-7404 

GLENN-ROBERTS COMPANY 

Manufacturers Transformer Type Welders - Electronics 

3 100 EAST lOTH STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 

Phone HIghgate 4523 

WEARTEX COMPANY 

Manufacturers of 
WEARTEX RUSH. BRAIDED and WOVEN COTTON RUGS 

2533 MAGNOLIA STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Telephone San Rafat^l 3 14 

SAN RAFAEL LAUNDRY 

BAXTER KAVANAUGH, Owner 
1 707 FOURTH STREET SAN RAFAEL. CALIF. 

Telephone San Rafael 4 74 7 

MANNY'S DELICATESSEN 

Michael Kremplse, P. S. Gillespie, New Owners 
The Best in Foods Ready to Eat - Low Points 

112 1 FOURTH STREET SAN RAFAEL. CALIF. 



Phone 4434- 



M, Geister or H. Geister 



San Rafael DO-NUT Shop 

No Order Too Large or Too Small - Orders Taken for All Occasions 



1555 FOURTH STREET 



SAN RAFAEL. CALIF. 



Phone S. .A. 3 744 

KINGS CLEANERS 

CLEANING - PRESSING - ALTERATIONS - REPAIRS 

"The Home of Perfect Service" 

1906 SIR FRANCIS DRAKE BLVD. FAIRFAX. CALIF. 



Phone 2756. W Henry Groker, Mechanic 

PARK SERVICE STATION 

John F. Frustuck 

LUBRICATION - PARKING - BATTERY CHARGING 

"UNION PRODUCTS" 

FAIRFAX. CALIFORNIA 

Phone 4800 - S. A. 4801 

JERRY'S FOOD CENTER 

GROCERIES, FRUITS, VEGETABLES, MEATS, FISH, POULTRY 

FAIRFAX. CALIFORNIA 
Phone S. A. 3400 

PANAMA GROCERY CO. 

GROCERIES - FRUITS - VEGETABLES - FISH AND POULTRY 



SAN ANSELMO 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone: OLympic 2868 Charles A. Huenneke 

MONTCLAIR PHARMACY 

PRESCRIPTION SPECIALIST 

5480 MORAGA A\ENUE at LA SALLE AVENUE 
OAKLAND. CALIFORNIA 



KEY GARAGE 



COMPLETE AUTO SERVICE 

3637 SAN PABLO AVENUE EMERYVILLE. CALIF. 

OLympic 3 5 05 



FRED SCHMITS 



ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR 

428 MacARTHUR WEST OAKLAND, CALIF. 

TEmpIebar 3020 

HUBBARD AUTO PARTS 

NEW PARTS FOR ALL CARS 



26 18 TELEGRAPH AVENUE 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



HYGENIC DOG FOOD COMPANY 



HEALTH FOOD FOR DOGS 



1000 MURRAY STREET 



BERKELEY. CALIF. 



TEmpIebar 9 134 "Gilmore Service" 

WARD BREWSTER 

LUBRICATION - COMPLETE WASHING 
Batteries - Tires - Accessories 



440 GRAND AVENUE 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



TWinoaks 2204 

"WHEN YOU PLAN A PARTY . . . CALL 

YALE'S DELICATESSEN 

3305 GRAND AVENUE OAKLAND. CALIF. 



BUY WAR BONDS 
AND STAMPS 



Page 78 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



April, 1945- 



Telephone DOuglas 5 I 86 

ISLE CAPRI RESTAURANT 

Famous for BONELESS STUFFED CHICKEN WITH RICE 

550 GREEN STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

WELCH'S DERBY 

554 MARKET STREET - SAN FRANCISCO 

FISHERMANS GROTTO 

AT FISHERMANS WHARF - STALL 9 SAN FRANCISCO 

HARRISON W. CALL 

ATTORNEY AT LAW * 

300 MONTGOMERY STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

BUCKHORN CAFE 

BEER - WINE - GOOD LIQUOR - COCKTAILS 
MIXED DRINKS 

2233 MacDONALD AVENUE RICHMOND. CALIF. 

SMITHY'S CAFE 

"Where Good Fellows Meet" 
WINE - BEER - LIQUORS 

2 14 CALEDONIA STREET SAUSALITO. CALIF. 

EDDI'S PLACE 

BEER - SANDWICHES 

"Drop In and Meet the Boys" 

1526 MacDONALD AVENUE RICHMOND. CALIF. 

LAZY BONES RESTAURANT 

DINNERS - LUNCHES 
Cocktail Lounge . . . Off Sale Liquors 

163 1 - I4TH STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 

Phone Mill Valley 775 

ESPOSTI'S FOUNTAIN 

ONLY THE BEST FOODS SERVED AT OUR LUNCHROOM 
Ice Cream - Milkshakes - Sodas • Breakfast - Lunch - Dinner 

127 THROCKMORTON AVENUE MILL VALLEY, CALIF. 



Phone QLympic 0981 



Sales Department C. D. Mooney 



CALIFORNIA SYRUP 8C EXTRACT CO. 



(Incorporated) 



!299 55TH STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone Sausalito 107 



Miss J. Peterson 



LA BLANCHE LAUNDRY 

All Packages C. O. D. Unless Arrangements Are Made at the Office 



109 SECOND STREET 



SAUSALITO, CALIF. 



MUSSO'S BAKERY 



BEST BAKERY IN TOWN . . . GOOD FRENCH BREAD 

TIBURON. CALIF. MARIN COUNTY 



Phone UNderhill 5773 

PEOPLES BAKING COMPANY 

. . . Oakland Plant . . . 
PARK AVENUE AND HARLAN STREET, EMERYVILLE 

1800 BRYANT STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

CLencourt 3079 Residence: LAndscape 2-3586 

ACME BOILER AND MACHINE WORKS 

J. A. Hurlev 

MARINE AND STATIONARY BOILER MAKERS 

Machinists and Electric Welders 

3 16 SECOND STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 

Phones — Oakland: TEmplebar 1023; San Francisco: UNderhill 2323 

GRANDMA BAKING COMPANY 

BAKERS OF FINE CAKES 



335 ADELINE STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone Mill Valley 401 



M. Arnarez - J. P. Etchebarren 



MILL VALLEY HAND FRENCH LAUNDRY 

ALL WEARING APPAREL HAND FINISHED 



138 E. BLITHEDALE AVENUE 



MILL VALLEY. CALIF. 



CLUB DINER 

GOOD FOOD AND GOOD SERVICE 
Liquors . . . Beer and Wine 



PIRATES CAVE 

SEA FOODS 

2 116 BROADW.AY OAKLAND. CALIF. 

Telephones: Hlghgate 4633 and 4634 T. C. Hobart 

HOBART EXPRESS CO. 

Specializing in DOWN-TOWN MOVING 
Storage - Shipping - Packing - Aircraft Transportation 

874 THIRTIETH STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 

Phones: GLencourt 1908 Residence: ANdover 9633 

The Prudential Insurance Co. of America 

Room 729 - Broadway Building 
1419 BROADWAY OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Phone Mill Valley 488 

BILL'S SUPER SERVICE 

PONTIAC SALES AND SERVICE 

General Automotive Service 

374 MILLER AVENUE MILL VALLEY. CALIF. 

Telephone OLympic 8812 Since 1925 

McKEE MANUFACTURING CO. 

Joseph L. McKee 

Enamel Finishing - Art Metal and Plain Colors - Signs in 

Quantity - Photographic Silk Screen Stencils 

812 SIXTY-FIRST STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Telephone LAndscape 5-73 36 

APEX PAINT COMPANY 

Manufacturers of PAINTS - VARNISHES - ENAMELS 

Painters' Supplies 

1201 SAN PABLO AVENUE RICHMOND, CALIF. 

Phone Richmond 2462 T, P & J. A. Yost. Props. 

YOST & YOST 

SUNSET AUTO COURT 

Modern Cabins with Refrigerators 

1099 SAN PABLO HIGHWAY 40 

PEERLESS BUILT-IN FIXTURE CO. 

COMPLETE MODERNIZING 

2608 SAN PABLO AVENUE BERKELEY. CALIF. 

Compliments of 

GRANBERG EQUIPMENT CO. 

1308 67TH STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone Hlghgate 4 100 



J. P. Moeller 



63 1 EAST TWELFTH STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



EAST BAY SHEET METAL WORKS 

Cornices - Skylights - Heating and Ventilating 



Phone San Rafael 1928 



j. Aldera. Prop. 



1101 MARKET STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



FLAT-IRON HOTEL 

ROOMS AND BOARD 



SECOND AND "B" STREETS 



SAN RAFAEL, CALIF. 



SUISUN 



MANILA POOL ROOM 

BEER-CANDIES-SMOKES 

CALIFORNIA 



April, 1945 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 79 



SAN BRUNO POLICE DEPARTMENT 

f Continued from page 19) 

glaries and even crimes of a lesser nature have been very 
small. With the heavy automobile traffic passing through 
San Bruno on El Camino Real and the Bayshore highway 
only two deaths resulted in 1944 from traffic accidents. 

To the San Bruno Police Department, headed by Chief 
William Maher, belongs the credit of preserving the peace 
in such a magnificient manner. The remarkable thing is, 
that though there has been a 60 per cent increase in the 
permanent population and with thousands of other men 
and women coming and going to the navy base, the army 
base, the airports and other places of war and industrial 
activity, Chief Maher has kept law-breaking down so 
splendidly with only eight men under his command. This 
is only two more than he had when he was appointed 
Chief of Police nearly 19 years ago. 

Chief Maher who has been a member of the Police 
Department for over 20 years, is the type of official 
who makes friends of all law-abiding people he meets. 
He has a good head on his shoulders and he has absorbed 
a lot about law enforcement. He and his mean have taken 
every course for the better understanding of their im- 
portant work given by the state, by the Peace Officers 
Association of California and by various Federal Bureau 
of Investigation classes of instruction. He is a member, 
and an active one, of the State Peace Officers Association, 
the Bay Counties Peace Officers Association and of the 
Pensinula Police Officers Association. 

He looks forward to further expansion of San Bruno, 
for there is now under construction 300 housing units 
for navy personnel. He first got an idea of what was in 
store for he and his force when in 1942, 8000 Japanese 
were brought to Tanforan and kept here for a year until 
they were assigned to other relocation centers, and other 
building projects are under way to take care of the ever- 
increasing number of people seeking homes in the city of 
San Bruno. 

San Bruno also has the new National Golden Gate 
Cemetery, and it is tragic to see the increasing number of 
graves being filled by men who have died in this war. 

Besides the Chief, the San Bruno Police Department is 
made up of the following: 

Sergeant James Bedford, Officers R. Cunningham, A. 
Britton, F. Bottari, F. Gomes, A. Fernande, T. Evans, 
and Desk Officer Henry North. 

The city is governed by an able and lively corps of 
councilmen. Headed by Mayor E. J. McGuire, they are 
Councilmen William Maurer, George W. Smith, Carl 
W. Halpburg and James J. Hearne. 

The police department has all its automotive equip- 
ment carrying 2-way radio, being serviced by the South 
San Francisco station. 

Plans are under way to erect a new police headquarters 
and Chief Maher has been given reason to believe his 
force will be increased by two additional members, much 
needed. 



Phone GArfield 53 M 

RAY'S 

"NONE BUT THE BEST SERVED" 

3 18 COLUMBUS AVENUE, AT GR.ANT SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone HEmlock 6085 



Geo. Bettencourt 



MONTAZUMA WINE CO. 

WE CARRY ALL THE BEST LIQUORS . . . THOROUGHLY AGED 

399 VALENCIA STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

1575 Incorporated 1897 



Pho 



one Mission 

INLAID FLOOR COMPANY 

Hardwood Floor Contractors - Machine Floor Sanding 
Manufacturers HARDWOOD FLOORING 

600 ALABAMA STREET, at 1 8TH SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Phone ATwater 1202 "Dura-Lite"' Hose 

GOODYEAR RUBBER COMPANY 

Manufacturers MECHANICAL RUBBER GOODS 

Factory in San Francisco 
2400 THIRD STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

Phone GRaystone 0700 Irvin Foster. Manager - S. Lalanne, Owner 



NEW DALT HOTEL 



The "Home Comfort" Hotel - Right in the Heart of the City 
Excellent Service - Reasonable Rates 

34 TURK STREET. Just Off Market SAN FRANCISCO 

EXbrook 6456 



FRANK M. PHIPPS 



Pacific Coast Manager 

American Home Fire Assurance Co. - Globe & Rutgers Fire 

Insurance Co, 

360 PINE STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

Telephone SEabright 2 194 

DORALEA BEAUTY SALON 

Nota Lee Spencer - Eleanor Edwards 
132 1 TARAVAL STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

ORdway 35 I 7 



THE BLACK MAGIC 



688 GEARY STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



THE LITTLE COFFEE SHOP 



41 CALIFORNIA STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



HEmlock 0989 Leo J. Sergianni. Prop. 

LEO'S PLACE 

FINE WINES, LIQUORS AND BEERS 

I7TH AND VALENCIA STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Mission 1500 



FRED W. CARROLL 



ATTORNEY AT LAW 

2811 MISSION STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



VAle 



0220 



M. Fizulich • L. Kulisich 



TWIN PEAKS COAL CO. 

COAL AND WOOD . . . BUY YOUR COAL NOW 



4092 - 24TH STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



COMPLIMENTS 

RUTH ELLEN GANNON 

59 EUREKA STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Phone MArket 1213 



L. GALTIE 



FRENCH CLEANING AND DYEING WORKS 

339-347 EIGHTH STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Phone 3-7035 



Mrs. L. Garibaldi, Prop. 



FLOSDEN GROCERY 



DELICATESSEN 
Fresh Vegetables - Beer 

1887 NAPA ROAD VALLEJO. CALIF. 



Page 80 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS^ JOURNAL 



April. 1945 




.'.'^^^^-■^ -■,■■'^■'■'^■''■^■'■'^■' -'-'^^^^^-'^^-'^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^7 



CROCKER FIRST 
NATIONAl RANK 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 



'-y^-y-^-^y^. ■y^.'.rT^ 



<'^y^/.\'//^'^//^^///^/ Z 1 



MacCORMACK — TRUCKER 

TRUCKER LUMBER COMPANY 

SAN ANSELMO, CALIFORNIA 



Phone San Rafael 104 



J. P Bonhag, Prop, 

SAN RAFAEL HARDWARE CO. 

VACUUM CLEANERS. RADIOS, ELECTRIC REFRIGERATORS 

625 - 62 7 FOURTH STREET SAN RAFAEL. CALIF. 



San Anselmo Courthouse Creamery 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

RAY NUTTING 



GREEN VALLEY HOG RANCH 

M. Barsotti and Pete Lera 

Ranch: Colma, Calif. Office: 159 Station Avenue 

DALY CITY. CALIFORNIA 



Phone DEIaware 5369 



Enrica Vanni. Prop. 



520 SAN ANSELMO AVE. 



SAN ANSELMO. CALIF. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

HAPPYLAND 

VALLEJO. CALIF. 



COTTAGE NURSERY and FLORIST 

Cut Flowers - Potted Plants - Bedding Plants - Fertilizer 

Floral Designs 

P. O. BOX 6. COLMA JUNIPERA SERRA BLVD. DALY CITY 

Phone RAndolph 8180 G. Bollentini and E. Giannini. Props. 

LUNCH, 7Sc - DINNER. $1.25 - CHICKEN DINNER, $1.25 

101 ITALIAN RESTAURANT 



7332 MISSION STREET 



DALY CITY. CALIF. 



April, J 945 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 8; 



WORTH REMEMBERING 

"To enable this hospital to render prompt ambulance 
service it is requested that, in the event an ambulance is 
desired by your office, a telephone call be made to the 
Receiving Office, Main Hospital, Letterman General 
Hospital, WEst 6111, Local 3190, 2157, or 2010. Am- 
bulance will deliver emergency cases direct to Dante 
Annex, Letterman General Hospital, n90 Broadway, 
San Francisco, California. 

"It is further requested that all previous instructions for 
obtaining ambulance service be disregarded for the hos- 
pital. 

"The former Dante Hospital at No. I'i90 Broadway, 
San Francisco, is now known as "Dante Annex — Letter- 
man General Hospital. It is an integral part of Letterman. 

— Fr.^nk R. Day, 
Major Pharmacy Corps, Adjutant, 
Letterman General Hospital." 

Compliments of 

I. MAGNIN & CO. 



GEARY and GRANT AVENUE 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone Hlghgate 083 1 Walter R. Cole 

WALTER R. COLE & CO. 

STEEL PLATE FABRICATORS 



500 ADELINE STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 




&^ft 




NOW ENJOY 
RICH CREAM 

AT NO 
EXTRA COST! 

Now every member of 
your family can enjoy 
rich, pure cream, whipped 
or plain, with all your 
meals. ..af no extra cost! 
It's easy with Borden's 
Cream-Top bottle and 
sanitary FREE! cream 
separator. 



FREE! 

CREAM 

SEPARATOR 



You're entitled to a 
handy cream separator 
free with your first pur- 
chase of Borden's Milk in 
the Cream-Top bottle. 



Borden's DAIRY DELIVERY CO. 



Phone Vallejo 1611 

CORONADO-INN 

AUTO TRAILER COURT 

At FLOSDEN 

Three Miles North of Vallejo on Napa 

Highway Near Intersection Sears Point Road 

and Chabot Highway 

• 

RESTAURANT ALSO ON 
GROUNDS 



Ideal Grounds for Parking Cars 

and Trailers 

Water, Lights and Other Accommodations 

Marion Coronado, Prop. 



Farmers 

and Merchants 

Savings Bank 




FRANKLIN at THIRTEENTH 
OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 



Page S: 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, J 94 J 



MORE ON CHIEF TRACY 

( Continued from page 1 6 ) 
Prosecuting Attorney's office are so closely allied to police 
activities, Oakland's far-flung voters will decide during 
April, 1945, whether or not $2,600,000 should be pro- 
vided for the construction of a separate building housing 
the various police departments and the police courtrooms, 
and the district attorney's city office. 

Chief Tracy has given many hours to studying the 
plans of the architects in outlining the proposed post-war 
improvement and indications at this writing are that the 
taxpayers and voters of Oakland will give the issue their 
approval. 

And as part of the progressive nature of Chief Tracy's 
command of more than 5 30 men and women in direct 
association with the Police Department, Oakland's city 
council has appropriated $3,000 for equipping and train- 
ing a volunteer reserve. 

"The idea is to have on call 200 men as part of our 
major disaster plan, a plan which involves a sudden 
emergency and in which the Police Department must, as 
peace officers, be on the job," commented Chief Tracy. 

Chief Tracy explained that, after all, the plan is a 
state-wide one, involving all major cities in the state. 

Under it volunteers, serving without pay, would con- 
tribute four hours a week as preliminary' training in this 
emergency program. 

And so, Oakland's Police Department moves on under 
the able and efficient command of Chief Tracy. 



SERGEANT ALBRECHT 

^Continued from page i ) 
should cause people who evaluate policemen by some 
fancied wrong they think they have suffered at their 
hands, to bow in shame. 

In commenting upon Sergeant Albrecht after the shoot- 
ing. Captain Alexander McDaniell. his commanding of- 
ficer, declared that the Sergeant was one of the best of- 
ficers he has ever had under him. having all the natural 
instincts of an investigator and a policeman. He seemed 
to be able to ferret out a law-breaker quickly and 
surely. He headed a detail Captain McDaniell had form- 
ed, comprising Albrecht, Officers Cornelius Harrington 
and John V. Lucnnski to investigate robberies and safe 
cracking jobs. This trio has been doing some mighty swell 
work, and have ended the career of a lot of the boys who 
sought this means of livelihood. 

Life is as dear to Sergeant Albrecht as to any living 
person, yet he was willing to sacrifice that life if he could 
bring to hook a man charged with breaking the law. 
That's the creed of all police officers of this state. Too 
many of them have paid the price. 

Phone HIghgate 4016 

CALIFORNIA RECREATION CO. 

BOWLING and BILLIARDS 

Fourle3n Alleys — Catering to Ladies and Beginners 

Twenty Tables — Pocket, Carom, Snooker 

1513 San Pablo Avenue -527 Sixteenth Street OAKLAND. CALIF, 



The CHEMICAL & 
PIGMENT CO. 

Division of the Glidden Company 

Factories: Baltimore, Md.; Collinsville, IH. 

Oakland, Calif. - Warehouses in Principal 

Cities Throughout the U.S.A. 



766 FIFTIETH AVENUE 
OAKLAND, CALIF. 



COMPLETE EYE CARE 

Scientific Eye Examination 

30 Years of Dependable Service 

Driving Goggles Ground to Prescription 

DR.DeGLORIA&DR.REVILLI 

Optometrists 
* 



OAKLAND 

483 12th Street 
HIghgate 3683 



OAKLAND 

1629 Broadway 

TEmplebar 5625 



SAN LEANDRO 

1194 East 14th Street 

Corner Callan Avenue at Davis 

SWeetwood 2156 



April J 945 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 83 



C. S. Bennetts 



T. W. Gilboy 



GILBOY 
AGENCY 



WHOLESALE 
MAGAZINES 



2400 FILBERT STREET 
OAKLAND 7, CALIFORNIA 



L 



Steve N. Bertone, Mgr. Owner 
Jules V. Accardi 

Harbor Gate 
Market 

O.P.A. No. 4 STORE 



29th and Potrero 
Richmond, Calif. 

Phone Richmond 764 



Phone Piedmont 9358 



RUMPUS 
ROOM 

* 

MIXED DRINKS 

* 

Pay Checks Cashed 



4090 San Pablo Ave., Emeryville, Calif. 



Hair Beauty Restored 

by Breck or Wella Kolestral treatments 



We Are Specialists in 

PERMANENT WAVING 
FACIALS - WAXING - ARCHING 



Now! Have beautiful eyelashes as only we 
can apply them 



YAZAIINA'S BEAUTY SALON 

1934 Broadway Oakland, Calif. 



Page 84 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



April, J 94? 



FINGERPRINT RECORDS IN 
BIBLE HISTORY 

( Continued from page 9 I 
Babylonian works; for the literature of the Assyrians, 
as well as their arts and sciences, was borrowed almost 
entirely from the Babylonians. In every then-accessible 
territory libraries were ransacked by the agents of Assur- 
bani-pal; all useful material was appropriated; damaged 
records were restored, and duplicates made of the "old 
masters" for the collection at Nineveh. In this way a con- 
siderable representation of early Babylonian culture was 
preserved by Assur-bani-pal, whose treasures, salvaged 
from Ninevite ruins, are of more interest and value 
than those of any other Assyrian-Babylonian collection 
unearthed. 

Notorious for ruthless barbarity, especially in warfare, 
Assur-bani-pal was no exception to his royal predecessors, 
and his historic wall-carvings depict all the current bru- 
talities of flaying alive, impalement, and other popular 
forms of cruelty. One graphically executed panel shows 
the king and his nobles at table, while nearby a number of 
luckless victims are upthrust upon sharpened stakes. A 
favorite Assyrian atrocity, especially in battle, was that of 
removing from each vanquished foeman's body some mem- 
ber as a trophy: this custom is exemplified in another 
panel -carving that describes a victorious conquest, and 
shows a representation of decapitated heads, together with 
a surroundinc; border of severed hands. 
(To he continiied) 



CHIEF THEUER 

{Continued from page 7) 
tography. Captain Hartness. who has charge of the Bu- 
reau of Identification and radio activities, has been given 
the latest equipment for "mugging" arrested persons, and 
an up-to-date photostatic machine. Enlarged quarters are 
being fitted up to the photographic part of his work and 
the radio quarters will be expanded. Operating its own 
radio station, the Burlingame Department has four auto- 
mobiles, three motorcycles and one three-wheeler all fitted 
out with two-way radio. 

This writer has known Jack Theuer for over 20 years 
and we have no hesitancy in predicting that he will give 
a fine example of law enforcement for the people of Bur- 
lingame, one which will assure to one and all that the 
beautifully located Peninsula City is a safe place in which 
to reside. 



Richmond 2406 



SHIP CAFE 

COCKTAILS — BEER AND WINE 

Mont" Bird - Elizabeth Foliett 

3 30 STANDARD AVENUE POINT RICHMOND, CALIF, 



DOTS PLACE 



FOUNTAIN LUNCH AND CLUBROOM 
. . , Good Service . . . 

837 SECOND STREET 



BENICIA, CALIF. 



Phone Benicia 414 



Joseph R, Gando, Prop, 



WINKS COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

"The Best of Service for Good Fellowship*' 

BENICIA. CALIFORNIA 



Phone TEmplebar 7823 



GARCO 

STEEL PRODUCTS 



FORGING 

FABRICATING 

MACHINING 



GARDINER MFG. CO. 



2711 Union St. 



Oakland 7, Calif. 



Simmons Co. 

E.vecutive Offices - New York, N.Y. U.S.A. 



Service Stations in Principal Cities 
United States and Canada 



United States Works 

Kenosha, Wis. 

Elizabeth, N. J. 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Atlanta, Ga. 

Los Angeles, Cal. 

Dallas, Texas 

Seattle, Wash. 

Kansas City, Kans. 

Watertown, Mass. 



Canadian Works 

Montreal, Que. 

Toronto, Ont. 

Winnipeg, Man. 

Vancouver, B. C. 



295 BAY ST. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



April, 1945 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' lOURNAL 



Page 85 



Phone 2-0138 



B. W. Shurtleff 



H. L. Elliott Telephone CArfield 4839 
Next Time Try 



Seating Capacity 330 



ELLIS CREAMERY 



For HEALTH and VITALITY 



831 ALAMEDA STREET 



VALLEJO. CALIF. 



THE DOWNTOWN CAFE 

LUNCH - DINNER - BANQUETS - PARTIES 

Cocktail Lounge Special Merchants Lunch 70c 

Dr. P. T. Angel, Managing Director Open II A. M. to 2 A. M. 

78 ELLIS STREET, near POWELL SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone 3-4187 



C. A. McDaniel 



MAC'S AUTO TOP SHOP 

SKILLED TRIMMERS and UPHOLSTERERS 
Auto Tops Repaired and Recovered 

129 NAPA ROAD at LOUISIANA STREET VALLEJO. CALIF. 

Phone 3-985 1 



MOORE'S MARKET 

Staple and Fancy Groceries - Quality Meats 
1701 NAPA ROAD VALLEJO. CALIF. 



STORK CLUB 



3 54 SAN PABLO AVENUE 



EL CERRITO. CALIF. 



Phone Novate 803 



Matt & Myrt 



Greetings 



LITTLE CLIFF HOUSE 



BLACK POINT 



Telephone Richmond 3409 

The Original Pirates Cave 

PIRATES' CAVE 

DELICIOUS SEA FOOD— STEAKS AND CHOPS 
OYSTER LOAVES TO TAKE HOME 

1032 MACDONALD AVENUE RICHMOND. CALIF. 

PERK UP CAFE 

SAM P. ANATAS 
FRIED CHICKEN OUR SPECIALTY 

3255 EAST 14th STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Res. Telephone 54I0W 



Bus. Telephone 4260 



Phone ANdover 801 I 

Freight Shipped, Stored or Delivered 



Car Load Distribution 



THOS. M. REDMAYNE GARAGE 

GENERAL MACHINE WORK 
CYLINDER BORING — SHAFT GRINDING 



121 I THIRD STREET 



SAN ANSELMO, CALIF. 



ALTA FREIGHT & TRANSFER 

GENERAL FORWARDERS OF FREIGHT 

MAIN OFFICE 152 1 HOPKINS ST.. OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 



Retail Stores: San Anselmo, San Rafael, Martinez, Vallejo, Napa 

WESTERN HOME FURNISHERS 

MEYER SCHWARTZ, President 

208 GREENFIELD AVENUE. SAN ANSELMO, CALIF. 



Phones DElaware 7474-7015 Henry G. Mills Roy H. Hinj 



MILLS 8C HINZ TILE COMPANY 

Office and Showroom 



5945 MISSION STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



BENNETTS BEN FRANKLIN'S STORE 

5c-10c-$1.00 and up — Dry goods. Work Clothes and Dresses 
Full Line Variety Store Merchandise 



BUY WAR BONDS 
AND STAMPS 



10 THROCKMORTON AVENUE 



MILL VALLEY. CALIF. 



Phone I 14 



Edward R. Freitas 



Spiro Gojkovich 




FAIRFIELD MARKET 

CHOICE MEATS - GROCERIES - FRUITS 

FAIRFIELD CALIFORNIA 

VICTOR'S AMUSEMENT 

POST CARDS - PHOTOS - ALL KINDS OF SOFT DRINKS 

2 14 MACDONALD AVENUE RICHMOND, CALIF. 



Page 86 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



^^X^'^i^ii^'BUSINESS DIRECTORY 



April, 1945 



TTTT „ H44 M'S- Jeweler 

Phone Hlghgate l3-»^ . ,, . m 

HARRY KAHAN 

Platinum Work -Diamond Sen.ng^^^_^ 

112 1 Washi ngton Street ^ 

Compliments of ^^.^ 

OAKLAND PANTS FACTORY 

,922 San PabWAvenue___Oaiaan^f^ 

L O BIANCO BROS. MFG, CO. 

no^Ho,,i^5^i!:r!^^ 

Bank of America Bjdg. Barber Shop 

s,,&'^o,^=-"BiaEW"""" 

Montgo mery & l-^'"e Jis. 

THE YOUNG COMPANY 

Marine ^ Industrial XV.re R°P- f P'^^j^^cfsco 
640 H arrison Street ^ 

VULCAN MACARONI CO. 

445 Drumm Street 

^^^^^^^^I^WILLINGER 

Jewelry Mounting Francisco 

704 Market S treet 

Compliments of 



i^ompiii"'^".--' "■ 

National Glove and Sportwear Co 

c^« Francisco 



Phone ORdway 7866 

LUCERNE APARTMENTS 

7b6 Sutter Street, nr. Jo nes San Francisco 
Phone VAlencia 4361 ^n=" ^itch 

STARLIGHT FURNITURE CO. 

Complete H°me Furnishers 

22 11 222 1 Mi ssion Street San r ran 

DE BERRY BROS. 

Radio Apparatus and Installations 

228 Drumm Street ^an Francisco 

Phone EXbrook tT^b ^^, .CCC 

L'EMPORIO LUCCHESE 

Gents- and Boys' Fu-'l^-^^^^^i^^^ 
1325 Stockt on Street =^" 

BABE'S CREAMERY 

2660 San Bruno Avenue San Franc is^ 

LOVELADY GROCERY 

Fruits - Vegetables 

Beer & NVines - School Supphes 

485 30th St. Mission 16 1" San r ra 



Phone Piedmont 7230 _ 

THE KING'S MARKET 

Meats - Groceries - F^esh Vegetab,„^^^^ 

342 1 San P ablo Avenue UaKlan 

■ ~ ~, John Perry 

Phone Sausalito 401 , ^ „, icT 

THE OLD GOLD DUST 

Wines. Licuors and Cigars -3^l;"-|>,J^°c°a'?.f. 

39 Caledonia Street 



Phone San Rafae 



lone San r.aiac. ^ 

MEDICO DRUG COMPANY 



1301 Fourth Street 



San Rafael. Calif. 



ph ,84 1 Va.co Souza • Amerigo Cranucci 

Tamalpais Produce Market 

E^ery^hin^g in F-^'^.-^.H^^iirate.' Retail 
Sr-^tnld^ottre^ts"'' ' S^an^tafael. Cali^ 



Groceries. Wines, Liquors 
, Fruits -d Vegetables ^^^^^,, 

585 1 West Street 



STANDARD AUTO PARTS 

«^-';^r2tf irre^et"'" - '^S^akllnTcalif 
928 East I2th btreet ^ 




Q. R. S. NEON CORP. 

690 Potrero Avenue 

Phone GArfield 495 7 - . - 

C 1 Hooper Pattern Works 

«■!,' „ in Need of Patterns, Phone Us 
When in Neea or r Francisco 
681 Brya nt Street -^ 

Phon- HEmlock 2032 All Work Guaranteed 

EDW. PETOUD 

Swiss Watchmakers and J|;;=J?;anc,sco 
,756 Mission St . nr. 14th St.. San r ran 

Phone WAlnut 1158 

Pacific Surgical Gown Co. 

Manufacturers of Surgical Gowns Etc 

1626 Eddy Street ^^" " 

Phone GArfield 959 1 

FERRY GARAGE 

Washing. Polishing. C-asin|. Repairing 
24 Drum m St.. at Market San 

Phone GArfield 5620 

. . R E N T A N . . . 

UNDERWOOD TYPEWRITER 

53 1 Market street San Francisco 



Phone EXbrook 9910 

VIENI-VIENI CAFE 

1313 Stockto n Slreet 

^^^^^^^^^^Y'S SHOPPE 

773Su^r^^^^r>n^^ 

„,,. ,.„. «M1 - B.Avview 283 7 

Phones. Skyline 8141 .,,, ,„cCDV 

GOLDEN GATE NURSERY 

^i^i^^^s^r;i6:4^^ 

KEANE'S MARKET 

Choice Meats - Free Delivery 
92 5 Cortland Avenue San Francisco 



Z^ Ti- ^iRl Harold Thomson 

Phone TEmplebar 5 181 , "^S^^,,,^ Lists 
MuUigraphing.M..neographing_Mail.ng 

THOMSON'S LETTER SHOP 

Complete Direct Mail Service^^^,^^ 

1 7D5 Broadway — 

Phone CHina 0099 Chm^e*. English Ptg. 

CHUNG SAI YAT PO 

Oldest, Largest Chinese Daily Outside China 

Translating . 

716 Sacramento Street_ ___San2ranc^o 

^^Z:^1^^^^Z^^^0 George Petersen 

Geo. Petersen dC Sons Furniture Co. 

?_^rr;f^"s?^^:^^ 

H. a: M. GROCERY 

499 Douglas Street San Francisco 

Ph Hlgate 97^4 Cars Called For 5. Delivered 

Runckel's Associated Service 

Lubrication - Tires - Accessories 

„., .. 1 . t;»r,.t Oakland. Calif- 
1600 Market Street 



,, . u » 9065 Private Booths 

Phone MArket 90BP 

TEMPLE GRILL 

Quality Food - Quick S|7« „ 
,974 16t h St.. near Mission San r ra 

ANTIQUE REPAIR SHOP 

2224 1;;^^;^^ 

PAVLIGER LABORATORIES 

SuL^XH^kefield Bldg^.^426^;nhjtreet 



Groceries - Wines - Liquors 

We Deliver ^ ,,, 

San Anselmo. Lain. 

Yoland a Station san«n 



C. A. SW ANSON 



420 Market Street 



San Francisco 



Compliments of 

DR. C. M. CHOW 



BUY WAR BONDS 

and 

WAR STAMPS 

• 



HOW TO LICK INFLATION 

Don-t lefs go off the deep end again. Don't lefs spend 
fooHshly. forgetting that the wages we-^re making now may 
not last forever, and bringing abo.^t inflation ,ust as w. did 
,n the first World War. Lefs hold down the cost ot hv.ng 
this time! By saving our money. By buying War Bonds 
and building a nest egg. By buying only what we absolutely 



need. By obeying the price ceihngs. Remember the terri- 

'' Are'you going to let your soldier lad come home to a 
country where a cup of coffee costs a quarter and a ham- 
hurger'costs a dollar? That would be ^-^^^^^^^^^ 
simply, a great and disorderly rise in ^^:^^ 

Don-t let it happen! Save your cash now. Buy War Bona 

Refuse to bid up prices. Pay off old debts. 



Apnl, 1945 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 87 



CHAS. MacGOWAN, International President 
HARRY NICHOLAS, Assl. International President 
WM. E. WALTER, International Secretary-Treasurer 
L. A. FREEMAN, Editor-Manager of 

"The Boilermakers Journal" 



International Brotherhood 

of Boiler Makers, Iron Ship 

Builders and Helpers 

OF AMERICA 

Organized 1880 
Affiliated with the A.F.ofL. 



LOCAL 39 



Pacific Tool 
& Supply Co 

SAN FRANCISCO 

and 

OAKLAND 

CALIF. 



Phone Lower Lake l-Y-4 Cottages - Rooms 

Cocktail Lounge and 
Restaurant 

Dancing - Fishing - Swimming - Hunting 

Boats - Motors - Minnows 

Speedboat Rides 

60 and 45 Foot Yachts for Charter 
Fred H. Teeple, Manager 

Clearlake Park 

LAKE COUNTY CALIFORNIA 



Phone TEmplebar 8299 



FREDERICK L R. CONFER 

Architect 




1214 Webster Street 
Oakland, Calif. 



Page 88 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, J 94 J 



THINKING ABOUT HOME 

When you come off the joh every day, goin" home, did 
you ever stop to think of the tremendous importance of 
your goin' home? We got to thinking about it the other 
day, and it was amaimg how all of the odd flashes zig- 
zagging through our mind fitted like pieces of puzzle you 
finally work out! 

Goin' home? 

Home is the view from your back yard and the way the 
river looks when you're just about sitting down to supper. 
It's your gal's new frock and your favorite pipe. . . . It's 
a beer with the fellows and a hamburger that tastes swell 
during milkmannish hours in one of the local diners. It's 
getting up early in the morning and waiting for the fel- 
low you ride to work with. It's a social security number 
and the rent due next week. 

Home is a lovely dance — the sound of your mom singing 
in the kitchen while she works. It's you and me in all our 
moods. Gay, sad, despondent, and questioning. These days 
especially, home is the feeling in your insides when you 
hear the Star-Spangled Banner. It's the feeling of having a 
job to come to — and the loneliness that comes over you 
when the night skies are filled with promises of spring 
days. . . . It's that o' boy! feeing on pay day — and the way 
the back yard smells after summer rain has fallen on your 
victory garden. It's the telephone call you've been waiting 
for and the mailman with "that" letter. 

Home is the way your mom complains about the weather 
and its effects on her rheumatism. It's the supper dishei! 
stacked up in the sink and leering at you. It's your old 
working clothes, and the suit or dress that gives yoii 
"oomph" when you wear it. 

Home is a great many things . . . the smell of the roast 
in the oven on Sunday . . . the kids trooping in after an 
afternoon in the first snowfall . . . 

Yes, Home is a lot of little things — but none more im- 
portant than this: HOME IS WHERE ALL THE 
SERVICEMEN WHO YOU AND I KNOW WANT 
TO BE . . . And the best way to bring them back to all 
these things that mean home is by buying that extra War 
Bond! 

Buy that Bond! 

— Lynne Smith in Habirshaw 'Hews 



T 



E. O'NEILL ELECTED 

AUTO CLUB PRESIDENT 

J. E. O'Neill, civic leader and agriculturist of Fresno 
County, today took office as president of the California 
State Automobile Association for 1945, following his 
election by unanimous vote of the Board of Directors 
of the motorists' organization at the annual meeting in 
the Palace Hotel, San Francisco, Thursday night, Janu- 
ary 18th. 

Largest membership in the thirty-seven year history of 
the Automobile Association, 116,929, an increase of 8,328 
in 1944, was reported by Irving H. Kahn, retiring pres- 
ident. 



Philadelphia 
Quartz Company 

Of California Ltd. 



SILICATE OF SODA 

In Its Various Forms 



Sixth and Grayson Streets 
Berkeley, California 



Compliments of 

Soule Steel 
Company 



1750 ARMY STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Phone TWinoaks 1620 

olie mia n 
Grrof to 

ITALIAN DINNER and 
SPECIALTIES 



I 



200 Broadway 



Oakland, Calif. 



Phone HUmboldt 9300 

ELECTRICAL PRODUCTS 
CORPORATION 

ZEON ELECTRICAL 
ADVERTISING 



950 30th Street 



Oakland, Calif. 



Phone TEmplebar 9342 

When You Have Time to Spare, Look For 

THE POLA BEAR 

at 

JOE & PETE PITTA'S 

North Pole Club 

DINE 8C DANCE 

* 
FLOOR SHOW NIGHTLY 



737 Kirkham Strett 
Oakland, Calif. 



Best Wishes to the Police and Peace Officers 
of California from 

OUR HOUSE 



Original home of 

The famous Southern Fried 
Chicken Dinner 

Gracious Hospitality 
KARL SHOLZ, Proprietor 

14874 E. 14th Street 
San Leandro, Calif. 



Sec 


. 562, P. L. & R. 


U 


S. POSTAGE 




PAID 


San 


Francisco, Calif. 




Permit 3172 



r 



Stohl, Nels S 

270 Claremont Blvd 
San Francisco, Cal 



To the Women 
of the West 

Suppose that by some miraculous 
chance a wounded American soldier 

— magically transported from Ger- 
many or Luzon — knocked feebly at 
your door. You would drop every- 
thing — everything — to care for him. 
"Gangway," you'd say. "This is a 
woman's job." 

From the Army hospitals of the 
land, the wounded are calling you 

— just as eloquently as from your 
doorstep. In those hospitals, wom- 
an's highest job — the eternal tri- 
umph of life over death — awaits 
you. The Women's Army Corps 
offers you opportunity to serve as a 
soldier — and a woman. 

In Army hospitals, many key tasks 
can be performed by any able and 
intelligent woman. So the Army has 
turned once more to the WAC. 
General Marshall himself is urging 
enlistments in WAC hospital units. 
Small need exists for him to em- 
phasize the emergency. From over 
the earth the casualties are crowd- 
ing in. Everywhere the too few doc- 
tors and nurses are working until 
they drop. You've heard the talk 
that nurses may have to be drafted. 
So the service you can perform as a 
member of the WAC is great. 
If you enlist now, you'll be given 




special training to help you become 
the right arm of the doctors and the 
nurses — and of the wounded men 
themselves. WAC hospital soldiers 
keep records, make beds, give baths, 
take pulse and temperatures, serve 
meals and liquids and do all the 
non-professional things connected 
with nursing. 

And the Army will sttive to as- 
sign you to a hospital near your 
home. You'll help care for boys 
from your own community. You'll 
be a woman who's a soldier and a 
soldier who's a woman — assigned 
to woman's greatest job. 




Listen to "The Standard 
Hour" Sunday evenings at 
8:30 over N.B.C. Stations. 



STANDARD OF CALIFORNIA 




.ficdtK 



,,^^'- 



PUBLISHERS OF 

WEEKLY AND MONTHLY MAGAZINES 
COMMERCIAL WORK 
HOUSE ORGANS 
PAMPHLETS — BLOTTERS 



465 Tenth Street • MArket 71 10 








AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 




OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



MOLKENBUHR BROS, 

•REPUTATION EARNED" 





Seamon Molkenbuhr 



Val Molkenbuhr 



Distributors 

LENOX HALL JEWELRY 

Biltmore Luggage 
Entire Third Floor 

23 GRANT AVENUE 

Opposite Magnin's 



Telephone Martinez 886 
Telephone Richmond 2513 
Residence Telephone 3277 

BERNICE A. ANDRADE 

Secretary-Treasurer 

• 

BARTENDERS AND CULINARY 
WORKERS 595 

Affiliated with the 
American Federation of Labor 

• 

729 CASTRO STREET 
MARTINEZ . . . CALIFORNIA 

607 MACDONALD AVENUE 
RICHMOND . . . CALIFORNIA 



Phone VAIencia 8223 



BROOKS 

Equipment Corporation 

OF CALIFORNIA 

Pacific Coast Distributors: 

Consolidated Ball Tooth 

Universal Joints 



636 POTRERO AVENUE 
SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



For Anything Pertaining to . , . 

REAL ESTATE 

Telephone Richmond 5620-5621 



RUBY BRYANT CO. 

"Property Management" 



4024 Macdonald Avenue 
Richmond, California 



June, 194)' 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page I 



Featured in This Issue 



Policing International Conference 



Page 

3 



Sheriff H. P. (Jack) Gleason of Alameda Co. . 5 
Bv B. S. Sanden 

President Truman's Address to Police Academy 6 

C. L. Collins, Redwood City's Chief For 28 Yrs. 7 

Fingerprint Records in Bible History .... 8 
By B. C. Bridges 

Officer W. D. Harrington's Son Cited For 

Bravery 10 

Robert O'Brien's First Year as San Mateo's Chief 1 1 

Chief Belloni of So. S. F. Starts 22nd Year as 

Head of Police Department 12 

School Safety Patrol in Review . . . .^ . . 13 

More Mill Valley Police Questions and Answers 14 

Modesto's New Police Chief 15 

Fitzpatrick New Secretary For Aid Association 16 

Patrolling a Police Beat 18 

Officer Carberry Resigns to Take Job With 

County Assessor 19 

Editorial Page 20 

Police Reserve Formed 21 

Inspector M E. Desmond's Son Honored . . . 23 

Lieutenant John Casey Dies 28 

Vacation at Home in 1945 32 



The Editor is always pleased to consider articles suitable for publication. 
Contributions should preferably be typewritten, but where this is not pos- 
sible, copy should be clearly written. Contributions may be signed with a 
"nom de plume," but all articles must bear the name and address of the 
sender, which will be treated with the strictest confidence. The Editor 
will also be pleased to consider photographs of officers and of interesting 
events. Letters should be addressed to the Editor. 



Directory 

SAN FRANCISCO POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Hall of Justice, Kearny and Washington Streets 
Telephones SUtter 2020 - 2030 
Radio Short "Wave Call KGPD 



Mayor, Hon. Roger D. Laph.am 



BOARD OF POLICE COMMISSIONERS 

Regular Meetings, Monday, 8:00 p. m Hall of Justice 

Hon. Jerd Sullivan, President Crocker First Nat'l Bank 

Hon. John Wesley Howell 240 Battery Street 

Hon. E. L. Turkington Furniture Mart Bldg. 

Captain Charles F. Skelly, Secretary 
Room 104, Hall of Justice 



CHIEF OF POLICE Charles W. Dullea 

DEPUTY CHIEF OF POLICE Michael Riordan 

Dept. Sec'y Capt. John A. Engler Hall of Justice 

District Captains 

Central A. L. Christiansen 63 5 Washington St. 

Southern A. E. McDaniell Fourth and Clara Sts. 

Mission Leo J. Tackney 3057 17th St. 

Northern A. I. O'Brien 743 Ellis St. 

G. G. Park John A. Reed Stanyan opp. Waller 

Richmond F. J. McGuire 451 Sixth Ave. 

Ingleside....John M. Sullivan.. ..Balboa Pk., nr. San Jose Ave. 

Taraval Michael E. I. Mitchell 2348 24th Ave. 

PoTRERO Jos. M. Walsh 2300 Third St. 

Headquarters Patrick J. Murray Hall of Justice 

Traffic Bureau Chas. F. Skelly 63 5 Washington St. 

Bur. Inspectors B. J. McDonald Hall of Justice 

Supervising Captain of Districts..M. GAFFEY..Hall of Justice 

Director 

Bureau of Personnel James L. English Hall of Justice 

Director - Bureau of 

Special Services.. ..Insp. Percy H. KENEALLY....Hall of Justice 

Director of 

Juvenile Bureau Geo. M. Healy 2745 Greenwich St. 

Director - Bureau of Criminal 

Information George Hippely Hall of Justice 

Property Clerk Capt. John J. Wade Hall of Justice 

Insp. of Schools Traffic Control.. ..Insp. Byron Getchell 
Big Brother Bureau Lieut, Harry Reilly 



WhenlnTrouble Call SUtteV 20-20 

When in Uoubt 



Always At Your Service 



Page 1 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



June, 1945 



SHREVE 

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For 93 years, people have come to 
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overlooking colorful Market Street 

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Police 
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(Established 1922) 




A Police News 

and Educational 

Magazine 

{Trade Maik Copyright) 



Vol. XXII 



JUNE, 1945 



No. 1 



Policing International Conference 



When the International Security Conference was 
scheduled for San Francisco, Chief of Police Charles W. 
Dullea realised that this epoch-making event, the most im- 
portant gathering that has ever been held in this or any 
other city, called for the maximum of police service. 




CAPT.'iiN M. E. Mitchell 

He planned to rid the city of undesirables and to keep 
others from coming here after the Conference began its 
weeks-long deliberations to map a course that would as- 
sure peace to the world for generations to come 

His force of over 1,200 men and women did a great job 
in keeping out those who might be attracted here for 
criminal purposes. 

He worked with the State Department, the FBI, the 
Treasury Department, the Army and Navy, and other 
agencies charged with giving the utmost in protection to 
the 1,000 or so delegates and assistants from more than 45 
nations of the world. The Conference brought to San 
Francisco, in addition, a thousand of the top-flight news- 
paper reporters and commentators, radio broadcasters and 
magazine experts. 

When the Conference opened April 25, Chief Dullea 
had laid the groundwork to properly police the city and 
see that nothing happened to the vast army of men and 
women who took part in the peace plans for which the 
convention was called. 

Captain of Inspectors Bernard J. McDonald picked a 
detail of experienced Inspectors for assignment under In- 



spector Fred Bohr of the Hotel Detail to cover the leading 
hotels of the city where the delegates from the various 
countries were housed. The detail was split up into smaller 
ones with an experienced Inspector in charge. The bigger 
the hotel the bigger the detail. 

Lieutenant Charles Maher of the Pickpocket Detail had 
an increased force scattered at points where the leather- 
lifters might seek to ply their nefarious trade unnoticed. 
Nary a pickpocket kick was registered. Special details 
of Inspectors were made to the meeting place of the con- 
ferences and the places where various committees held 
deliberations. 

How well these assignments functioned is indicated by 
the entire lack of any complaints of lawbreaking in any 
sector the members of the San Francisco Police were given 
the responsibility of policing. 

But there was another important matter to look out for 
in completing the plans to see that the city lived up to its 
reputation of law-abiding community. That was the assign- 
ment of uniformed men to the task of looking after things 
on the streets leading into the Civic Center where the 
meetings of the Conference were held and about the area. 

To carry out this task Chief Dullea formed a separate 
company of 100 men designated as the "Security Com- 
pany." Captain Michael I. Mitchell of Taraval was placed 
in charge. He couldn't have made a better selection for 
such an important post, for Captain Mitchell during his 
more than 30 years as a member of the San Francisco 
Police Department has done many things that have at- 
tracted commendable attention to his work. He progressed 
through all ranks of the Department until he reached the 
top many years ago, and in this highest commissioned rank 
he has continued to give the same efficient police service he 
did during his whole career. 

The hundred men, who had headquarters in Dormitory 
G, Civic Center, were personally selected by the Chief 
and his top officers, and they were selected solely on their 
record as courteous and efficient officers as well as for 
physical size and neatness. Heretofore the assignment of 
patrolmen and officers for special occasions has been made 
by orders going out from headquarters to the various cap- 
tains to detail a certain number of men to serve during the 
special occasion. But for the Conference the Chief de- 



Page 4 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



June, 194S 



cided it would work out better it the men were selected 
by headquarters and properly trained for the important 
work ahead for them. 

On April 22 a few days prior to the opening of the 
Conference the company went on parade for inspection 
at its newly assigned headquarters. Chief Dullea with 
Deputy Chief Michael Riordan. Captains Michael Gaffey 




Captain Bernard McDonald 

and John Engler acted as aides. Mayor Roger D. Lapham 
and Police Commissioners Jerd Sullivan, J. Wesley Howell 
and E. L. Turkington were on hand as the iine appearing 
members of the newly formed company lined up for re- 
view. Chief Dullea impressed on the members that they 
were a selected group and said he had no misgiving about 
the splendid manner they would carry out the traditions 
of the San Francisco Police Department during this his- 
toric conclave of nations. 

As second in command of the Security Company, Capt. 
Mitchell was given Lieutenants William L. Danahy and 
Jack Eker. 

Sergeants assigned were Richard L. Hanlon, Alfred 
Nicolini, Charles Radford, Charles Lyons, Joseph Perry 
and Raymond Freeman. 

The following patrolmen filled out the rest of the roster 
of Security Company: John Doolmg, Michael McCarthy, 
John Foley, Maurice Higgins, Dino Fortina, Eugene Short, 
John D. Sullivan, Cecil Benson, James Glennon, William 
Bard, John McCarthy, John Nyland, George Sturken, 
Charles Dickow, John Kwartz, George Millstead, George 
Hesketh, C. Bahr, E. King, A. Doyle, Wm. Leahy, E. 
Oliva, F. Ryan, A. Bagot, D. Bradley, R. Dickman, J. 
Countryman, P. Larsen, J. Molinan. E. Nevin, E. Wayda. 
F. Sturken, M. Duffy, John Clasby, W. Sparks, R. 
Hooper. F. Pierce, L. Keenan, A. Brune, E. Hall. Stanley 
Kelly, D. Sullivan, G. Sully, W. Osterloh, L. King, G. 
Thompson, W. Cross, G. Gome:. J. Surges, F. Dunphy, 
B. Garrett, E. A. Franke. A. P. Markgraf. K. Schaugaard, 
V. Williamson, E. Woods. 



Mounted Officers: J. P. Curtin, Charles Cooke, Joseph 
Hattrup, John J. Casey, Jr., Howard Marks, James Doran. 

When the national Democratic Convention was held in 
San Francisco some 25 years ago the San Francisco Police 
Department was given great praise from visitors and dele- 
gates from over the Nation for the fine manner they 
policed the important meeting. 

You will hear much more praise given to the Depart- 
ment for the perfect policing of San Francisco during the 
International Conference. Besides extending courteousness 
to all, the police gave sympathetic ear to all the questions 
of the hundreds of visitors here during the meetings, and 
gave complete instructions on how to get to various points 
of the city and to neighboring towns and cities where the 
questioner might desire to go. 

It was a fine example of teamwork from the Chief 
down to the newest recruit. San Francisco did a swell job 
in providing a meeting place for the representatives of our 
allied nations throughout the war; of seeing they were 
properly housed, and fed; that the accredited representa- 
tives were given adequate quarters for general meeting and 
for committee meeting; entertainment of a desirable 
nature, following the mourning period following the un- 
timely death of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt; to 
one and all, no matter what their race, color or creed were, 
each and every resident of this city went out of his way to 
e.xtend the typical San Francisco welcome. 



EIGHT ACE DETECTIVES HERE 
FOR BIG MEET 

Eight ace detectives from New York, Chicago, Hot 
(Continued on page yO ) 




Chief Dullea swears in out-of-city Detectives assigned to work 
with SFPD during Conference. Left to right: Lt. Victor Penny, 
Inspector Tim O'Connor. Inspector jerry Watson on whom Chief 
Dullea IS pinning a star, Capt. J. J. Groesch, Inspector Ed Witrey. 
Inspector Frank Keohane. Inspector Jos. Sullivan. D. J. Campion. 



June, J 945 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page y 



Sheriff H. P. (Jack) Gleason of Alameda Co. 

Former Professional Ball Player, War Veteran, 

Operates Finest Jail System in the United States 

B_v B. S, (Sandy) Sanders, Veteran PoUce Reporter for the Oa\land Post-Enquirer 



"The county . jail system in Alameda county is the 
finest in the United States . 

Quite a statement, that, but you can find it in the 
Congressional Record under a quotation from the report 
of Congressman Louis C. Rabaut, Michigan, chairman 
of the Federal Prison Commission. 

It's a signal tribute to Sheriff H. P. (Jack) Gleason 




Sheriff H. P. Gleason 

of Alameda county, who is rounding out six years in 
this important county office. 

The congressional committee made a tour of the nation 
a few years ago checking on federal, state, county and 
municipal prisons. 

The Rabaut report also included this sentence: "It 
showed capable, intelligent directorship on the part of 
Shenff H. P. Gleason." 

And since that report was made Sheriff Gleason has 
continued improving the county jail system as well as 
piling up honors as an efficient and quick-acting peace 
officer. Incidentally, Gleason is third vice-president of 
the California State Peace Officers' Association and vice- 
president of the Bay Counties Association. 

From the Municipal League of Research, which also 
made an exhaustive study of county jails at the time 
Seattle was preparing to revise its county jail system, re- 
ported that Alameda county's jail "was one of eight 
county jails outstanding in the nation." 

J. Edgar Hoover, F.B.I, chief, Nat. J. Pieper, in charge 
of the West Coast F.B.I, activities, the late C. S. Stone, 
chief of the Division of State Bureau of Identification, 
have likewise given high praise to SherifFGleasonandstaff. 



Sheriff Gleason didn't start out in life to be a peace 
officer. For a number of years he was a professional base- 
hall player, he followed the sea, was a member of Uncle 
Sam's fighting navy in World War I, and had served 
a stretch of 4 years in the navy prior to the outbreak of 
the 1914-1919 world war. 

In between there were 1 ? years when Sheriff Gleason 
served in the circulation department of the Oakland Tri- 
bune and two years with the San Francisco Chronicle. 
On the Tribune he rose to assistant circulation manager. 

Gleason became a deputy sheriff under the late Sheriff 
M. B. Driver in 1937. He advanced to undersheriff in 
1940, and in November of that year Sheriff Driver retired 
and the Alameda county board of supervisors immediately 
named Gleason sheriff as Driver's successor. 

Serving out the two years of Sheriff Driver's unexpired 
term, and while the political wise ones predicted that Jack 
Gleason couldn't be elected, he ran so far ahead of his 
nearest opponent that one oldtimer remarked: "Jack 
Gleason just walked in." 

But those few years m the sheriff's office had, according 
to Gleason himself, convinced him that he wanted to 
make peace officer work his career. 

And Sheriff Gleason has made a close study of police 
work ever since he first stepped into the sheriff's office 
as a deputy. 

Since he became sheriff his deputies have grown to 120, 
along with one woman deputy, Mrs. Minna Ralph, and 
12 stenographers. 

Two complete 2 -way radio stations are maintained, 
with 3 sub-stations. 

And here's something to think about: Sheriff Gleason's 
staff patrol 640 square miles out of the 800 odd square 
miles embraced by Alameda county. 

The sheriff's office also maintains two jails, one in the 
new county courthouse building and the other in the 
former headquarters on lower Washington street in Oak- 
land. 

In addition, there is the prison farm, a strictly honor 
farm, where there are no fences and no restrictions 
placed on the prisoners sent there. During the past few 
years some 14,000 prisoners have served out their time 
at the prison farm, located in Eastern Alameda county. 

And speaking of the county jail system, an experienced 
jail bird who had served in jails all over the country 
told Sheriff Gleason the other day: "This is the first jail 
I was ever in where there are no rackets." 

The identification bureau under Fred Harnden is rec- 
ognized as one of the best in the country. Harnden is 
( Continued on page 34) 



Page 6 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



June, 1945 



President Truman*s Address to Police Academy 



The following is the address that President Harry S. 
Truman was to make at the graduation exercises of the 
28th session of the National Police Academy, FBI, in 
Washington, D. C, on the morning of April 14. President 
Truman, when selected to make the address, was Vice 
President, but the untimely death of President Franklin 
Delano Roosevelt caused the graduation exercises to be 
cancelled, therefore the speech was not made. But a copy 
of it was given each graduate. It is a tribute to law enforce- 
ment officers and what they are doing to better their pro- 
fession and improve their so necessary work of preserving 
the peace, by taking training courses and getting, by hard 
work and study, means to cope with the ever-present law- 
breaker. Therefore the Police and Peace Officers' 
Journal presents it in full. It shows how strongly our 
new president feels for the men and women charged with 
maintaining the peace of our nation: 

THE HOME GUARD 

"It is a special privilege to address the guardians of the 
home front. It would be more than tragic if. while fighting 
a world-wide war to preserve our democratic ideals, we 
would neglect the constant battle against evil forces at 
home. 

"Fortunately, the specialized training provided here at 
the National Police Academy, under the supervision of the 
Federal Bureau of Investigation, assures America that we 
will continue to have well-equipped specialists to maintain 
peace and order within our borders. 

"Please permit me to pay special tribute to the man who, 
in addition to founding the National Police Academy, has 
played such an important part in improving law enforce- 
ment throughout the United States. I refer to your dis- 
tinguished leader, the moving spirit behind the Federal 
Bureau of Investigation, my good friend, the Honorable J. 
Edgar Hoover. 

"You men have been especially fortunate in being 
selected for intensive training at the greatest crime clinic 
in the world. Here you have learned the wonders of 
modern scientific methods. You have acquired skill in using 
the latest weapons available. Even more important, here 
you have been taught the all-essential need of quick co- 
operation with all law enforcement agencies, local, county, 
state and federal. If we hope to make sound progress for 
the benefit of all society, we must carry on a well-coor- 
dinated, all-out attack on crime. 

"You officers have had the opportunity to study the 
most modern methods of crime prevention and crime de- 
tection. Your intense training here at this most efficient 
center should pay you and society great dividends in the 
years to come. You learned not merely the use of scientific 
methods in combating the enemies of society, but also the 
urgent need of effective cooperation with all the other 
useful agencies. Only by a nation-wide, coordinated cam- 
paign by all law-enforcement agents can we achieve the 



highest degree of efficiency, which in itself will be one of 
the most effective means of preventing anti-social acts. 
Certainty of criminal apprehension is the most powerful 
check on crime. 

"Tremendous progress has been made in criminology 
during the last century. In the past the criminal was 
punished in a spirit of revenge, without proper considera- 
tion of the many factors which gave rise to this problem 
of social maladjustment. Criminals are not born such. They 
are usually the unfortunate product of their environment, 
experience and social background. 

"In view of the many economic and health factors, 
which frequently give rise to criminal tendencies, there 
remains a tremendous job for society to accomplish. Our 
statesmen must eliminate most of the outstanding inequities 
.in our social structure, providing greater individual 
security, improved health, and a better economic oppor- 
tunity for all our people. Then a most important step will 
be taken in removing some of the main reasons for crime. 

"The war has greatly complicated the problems of law- 
enforcement agencies. In the first place, there remains the 
constant danger of saboteurs, spies and enemy agents, all 
anxious to undermine our militarj' power and the public 
morale. Fortunately, the splendid work of the Federal 
Bureau of Investigation, under the able direction of Mr. 
Hoover, has made these enemy efforts of little value. How- 
ever, constant vigilance is still necessary for the preserva- 
tion of life and property at home. 

"Another factor, which hit agencies charged with the 
maintenance of law and order, has been the call to arms of 
many of our most active officers. Yet, despite all handicaps, 
utilization of modern scientific methods has made possible 
the record achieved. As in all matters mortal, there still 
remains room for improvement. 

"The most distressing aspect of the current criminal 
/'Continuecf on page 24 ) 

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AUCTION EVERY WEDNESDAY 
1865 POST STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



June, 1945 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 7 



C. L Collins Redwood City's Chief For 26 Years 



Redwood City's Chief of Police, C. L. Collins has the 
distinction of being the oldest, in point of service, of any 
chief of police in California. 

Chief Collins, who joined the Redwood City Police 
Department on October 1, 1913, was appointed Chief on 




Chief C. L. Collins 

March 1, 1919, thus having completed 26 years as head 
of the Department. 

He has seen the little Peninsula City, he has so well 
served, grow from a population of 6000 since he was first 
appointed Chief to a busy and bustling city of over 16,000 
people. 

You ask Chief Collins about the crime situation in Red- 
wood City and he turns to you with a surprised look on 
his face and says: "Why, we haven't had a murder here 
in 20 years, nor have we had a bank robbery since I 
joined the Department, and a $7,000 jewelry robbery is 
about the biggest thing we have had in that line since I 
have been Chief (and the perpetrator of this crime was 
gathered in and sent to San Quentin where he took a 
course in grain sack knitting). We have had no burglaries 
that would make the front pages of the papers for years, 
and so-called major crimes are very rare around here " 

One might be inclined to think that Chief Collins was 
just lucky in that his town has escaped the depredations 
of the evil-doers, but if one goes into the matter he will 
hnd that It IS far from a matter of luck. 

Chief Collins realizes the position of any small com- 
munity adjacent to a big metropolis, such as San Francisco 
He realizes that crooks are apt to pick a neighboring small 
city from which to conduct their illegal operations, figur- 
ing the small town officers are not as alert as the big city 



police. Well, we might say, there are plenty of instances 
around the Bay area where these wrong-thinking guys 
have found they were putting their chances on the 
wrong card. The small city police departments around 
the bay of San Francisco are nothing like the old-time 
"town whittlers" who made up the law enforcement units 
of city government. They are today headed by intelligent 
honest, efficient and far-seeing men who take the ones 
selected for police duty and train them in all phases of 
law enforcement. 

Chief Collins meets the qualifications cited above as 
to honesty, intelligence and efficiency and he has demon- 
strated in many instances that he has the foresight to 
keep his Department at top form, has seen his men prop- 
erly instructed and educated in all lines of police work, 
and then has seen them given the proper equipment by 
which the enforcing of the laws is made more easy and 
surer. 

He was a pioneer in the organization of the Junior 
School traffic control system, and since these school lads 
have directed traffic at and near schools for over 25 years 
there has been no accidents to the thousands of school 
children who have been cared for by this corps of trained 
young school boys. 

Redwood City has a fleet of two-way radio equipped 
radio cars, serviced by its own short wave radio station. 

The Department is housed in a well-arranged and well- 
lighted headquarters in the cil.u's modern city hall. 

Redwood City's Police Ofiicers have taken all courses 
given by the FBI and by the ■ 1;: te peace officer instructors, 
and all are experts with small liirearms. Chief Collins has 
participated personally in tlu^s:; courses of instruction 

Redwood City has a numb.:.; of smaller plants devoted 
to the war efforts, furnishing employment to many men 
and women, but the city .sblf remains a favorite place 
for those who want a home m the fine climate and environ- 
ments the place offers. The Southern Pacific and the 
Greyhound bus lines probably carry more commuters to 
and from San Francisco than any other point between 
the latter city and San Jose. 

During the past year the Chief has added to his per- 
sonnel a welfare officer. The new officer is Mrs. Lois Page 
who was appointed a year ago and she has charge of such 
juvenile delinquencies that may be presented to the Police 
Department, and it might be added, there isn't much 
juvenile delinquency in Redwood City. Mrs. Page is 
well trained for this position and she has justified her ap- 
pointment in many ways during the time she had served. 

The members of the Police Department under Chief 
Collins are: 

Lieutenant S. D. Wood, Sergeants S. E. Doughlas and 

E. G. Fogarty, Officers Clyde Genochio, H. J. Mengel 

C. V, Stafford, Philip Bray, Robert West, T. N Mouda- 

kas, William Faulstich, D. R. Margan, A. C. Hoffman, 

(Continued on page 41 ) 



Page 8 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



June, 194S 



Finser Records in Bible History 



By B. C. Bridges 

Sufterintendent Bureau of Identijication 

Alameda Police Department 



The author of the accompanying article, which was 
written for the San Francisco Police Journal, is an inter- 
nationally recognized expert in identification. He is the 
author of the book, "Practical Fingerprinting," one of the 
most complete authoritative and up-to-date works on fin- 
gerprinting, published by Funk and Wagnalls Co., New 
York. 



I All rights reserved hy the author) 

Amid its many old and modern treasures, the British 
Museum holds one certain relic that is of high significance 
in the theme of hands and fingerprints. It is an old court 
record from ancient Babylon. Inscribed upon clay, as were 




SuPT. B. C. Bridges 

those of Nineveh, this tablet offers evidence of the early 
uses of fingerprints in actual identification procedure. The 
portion that once bore the then-ruling monarch's name is 
broken away and lost in the wreckage of centuries, but the 
document's obvious age dates back to the first millenium 
B.C. 

This small and mutilated vestige becomes a mystic talis- 
man to break the bonds of time and space, transporting 
the beholder to the valley of the Euphrates, and to the 
Semitic city of antique magnificence and luxury that was 
the capital of Babylonia. In many respects outclassing her 
rival, Nineveh, Babylon was once a center of the world's 
commerce, chief patron of the arts and crafts, and eternal 
symbol of glorified intemperance. 

On a certain day, some thousand years or more before 
the Christian era, the deputy and brother of a Babylonian 
magistrate was given official instructions, commanding 



stern measures in the settlement of a debt. This officer's 
name was Nabu-usibsi. He departed from the court of the 
presiding jurist, his relative, bearing signed authority to 
perform a sworn charge, that of arresting the person and 
confiscating the estate of one Bel-lumur, the debtor of 
Nergal-iddin. 

Returning after he had performed this duty, Nabu- 
usibsi re-entered the hall of justice and carefully dictated 
his personal report of the proceedings to a waiting scribe, 
one of many who sat in daily attendance at tables pro- 
vided with stacks of unbaked-clay tablets, styluses, and 
various other scriveners' adjuncts. Carefully the skilled 
clerk wrote in Neo-Babylonian cuneiform, recorded the 
deputy's name, and finally witnessed the impression of 
Nabu-usibsi's thumb-print in the damp clay. However, 
prior to this last gesture of personal sanction and approval, 
the scribe repeated aloud the content of the tablet, to 
rectify any slight error or omission; the included text read 
as follows: 

"Nabu-etir, my brother, gave me the following instruc- 
tions: he sent me this order from the country: 'Give five 
and one-half minae of silver to Nergal-iddin, the creditor 
of Bel-lumur. Thereafter, you will capture Bel-lumur and 
his son. Prepare a documentary report describing the arrest 
and the taking of his house and property, and secure 
thereon the fingerprints of Bel-lumur.' 

"I did then give five and one-half mina: of silver of my 
own, out of my purse, to Nergal-idden, the creditor of 
Bel-lumur. Bel-lumur, his wife, and their son, Ea-lumur, I 
did take from the treasure house of Daddias, and took 
them away." 

The given reference to "the country" in the beginning 
of this document might suggest that Babylonian judges, 
like many modern jurists, may have taken respite from the 
press of judicial responsibilities in some outlying villa. 
However, such was not the significance in this instance. 
The term "country," as used here, refers to a jury of 
representative individuals, selected to voice the policies of 
their constituents, and thus synonymous with "the coun- 
try," just as grandjurymen are convened to support the 
interest of the citizens whom they represent. 

A humorous note is interjected by the emphasis with 
which the deputy reiterates that he gave five and one-half 
minae of silver "of my own," and "out of my purse," 
apparently anxious to insure his eventual reimbursement 
for the sum advanced. The "treasure-house" referred to 
would probably be some place of temporary safe-keeping, 
where property or persons might be held pending final 
disposition. 

The allusion to the magistrate as "my brother," implies 
that nepotism, the wholesale usurpation of civic positions 



June, 194S 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 9 



by various memhers of the same family, is by no means a 
novelty. 

The salient point, however, is the order to identify the 
defendant, and given so casually, it indicates that finger- 
printing was a common practice of the period, and well 
understood by all concerned. 

Time passed, and the fall of Babylon and Nineveh came 
to be little more than legendary tales, while the cumulus 
of ages gathered above the sites where once their marvels 
endured, and all their annals of great and small importance 
lay deep-buried beneath secretive earth in the silent 
archives of eternity. 

But the ever-curious and investigative hand of modern 
research delved within the romantic debris of those ancient 
and amazing cities, whose existence had become half mythi- 
cal, and presently resurrected chambers of a palace-temple 
revealed the lost histories of a Hittite empire. 

These clay tomes from the two greatest cities of the old 
world, dealt with every phase of life; with law, medicine, 
magic, and legend; here also was included an amazing story 
of the Creation, quite similar to that in the Book of 
Genesis. Of many sizes, some of the tablets measured as 
much as several feet in length, while others were no larger 
than postage stamps. The consummate skill displayed in 
their inscriptions, and more especially in those of miniature 
dimensions, is incredible. Reason is taxed to believe that 
characters of such minute size could be produced without 
the aid of magnifying facilities, an attainment which lay 
far in the future. The script universally employed was 
cuneiform, as used in the Semitic countries of Assyria 
and Babylonia, and the languages comprised at least eight 
different dialects. 

Although these innumerable baked-clay records fre- 
quently were authenticated by the author's nail-mark or 
thumb-impression, the practice was by no means limited 
to that part of the known world, and other countries were 
employing the same utility in various adaptations. 

When the great Phcenician galleys were booming up the 
Nile, freighted with "peacocks, apes, and ivory," and 
gilded figureheads of Tarshish ships flashed above slave- 
manned oars sweeping in unison to thud of coxswain's 
drum, the mighty Pharaohs were vainly sealing their se- 
creted tombs against ghoulish plunderers, marking their 
mummy-swathing ^vith personal stamps, and carving upon 
the walls of temples and upon stela and obelisks, the royal 
cartouche by which archeologists three millenium hence 
were to identify the vandalized and scattered fragments 
which once were kings and queens. 

Those magnificent and vanished hierarchies evoke deep 
admiration for their intelligent application of simple but 
effective identification methods. The brief touch of seal or 
digit upon pigment, clay, or papyrus, was a ready safe- 
guard for both men and merchandise in the business of 
mercantile as well as national affairs. 

With the refinement of Egyptian culture, hand sig- 
nificance was not only appreciated, but also symbolized in 
their colorful hieroglyphics, which included depictions of 
arms, hands, and fingers as used descriptively in the picture 
writings; and according to Dr. Faulds, the early Egyptians 



compelled criminals to "sign their confessions with their 
fingerprints." 

Although the Sumerian rulers of Ur, Babylon, and 
Nineveh, as well as the Egyptian Pharaohs, recognized and 
employed the finger- and thumb-seal, it was obviously im- 
practical to involve actual digital contact with every sig- 
nature. Administrative business within the teeming pre- 
cincts of a palace in a kingdom of military supremacy, with 
its countless claims and interests, involved the validation 
of a vast and continual flow of official writings. Plainly, 
a kingly touch upon each of these would be out of the 
question. Thus it was that royal "seals" were made, de- 
picting or symbolizing the sovereign hand. Sometimes, in 
the form of a small cylinder to be rolled across the tablet, 
these authoritative stamps might be entrusted to a deputy; 
but issues of vital importance demanded a more personal 
verification, and here also the esteemed fingers must be 
spared. Carven in precious stone, was the master-seal, a 
ring that seldom left the monarch's hand; this served as a 
sign of his supreme authority. 

There is little doubt as to origin and inspiration of the 
"personal seal" which developed as a substitute for the 
physical and supposedly-occult contact of a hand or finger 
touch. In some of the oldest languages, the term "signa- 
ture," "seal," and "fingerprint" are all indicated by the 
same word. 

Nor was the personal seal something used by kings 
alone. Herodotus, in describing the customs of Babylon, 
wrote: "Every Babylonian had a seal. It served as a per- 
sonal symbol, a distinctive and unforgettable signature 
which he could stamp upon clay business documents." 
These seals were engraved upon chalcedony, crystal, jasper, 
marble, hematite, basalt, and a variety of other stones, and 
there are indications that they were looked upon as amulets 
as well as signets, the engraved pictures of gods and 
guardian genii investing them with protective significance. 

When ground in cylindrical form to be rolled over the 
soft clay of letters or other writings, they were usually 
from three-quarters of an inch to an inch and a half in 
length, two-fifths to three-fifths of an inch in diameter, and 
pierced lengthwise to be worn on a cord about the owner's 
neck. The designs were engraved intaglio. There were 
schools at various periods to teach the art of cutting seals 
throughout Mesopotamia, in Ur, Erich, Akkad, Babylon, 
and Nineveh; and exquisite examples of their skill have 
been found in great profusion. 

Rich and poor alike possessed and employed personal 
seals, and more especially those who dwelt within 
the city walls. But many there were who occupied the 
hinterlands farther from routes of trade. They, too, en- 
gaged in enterprise, which, though perhaps of lesser con- 
sequence, frequently involved the question of an identify- 
ing autograph. And here, as ever, the adaptable impression 
of a fingerprint or hand found service in some prime 
necessity. 

At a point eight miles north of Jerusalem, productive 
excavations were conducted by the late William Frederick 
Bade, of Berkeley, California. He not only discovered a 
(Continued on page 36 j 



Page 10 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



June, 1945 



Officer W. D. Harrington*s Son Cited For Bravery 



The fighting forces of these United States are going 
to furnish a lot of well-trained men to the law enforce- 
ment agencies of the country when Peace is finally estab- 
lished. These young men will be available to police de- 
partments and sheriffs offices and they will bring into 
the work of enforcing the laws of the land discipline and 
proven courage. They will be physically fit, and from 
their training and combat service they will be able to take 
up the battle against crime and criminals, which usually 
increase following a war. 

San Francisco has one candidate from the U. S. 
Army. He is a young man now over in Europe and who 
is No. 2 on the eligible list for patrolmen in the San Fran- 
cisco Police Department. When he is discharged from 



JtL 


i 


i^^^^ 


"\ 


^^f^^rPI^ 


] 




i 


|| 



Lr. Walter D. Harrington 

the Army all he will have to do is to start in as a local 
police officer is to pass the physical examination, which 
he will be able to do for he has met all army requirements 
in that regard. 

This young man is First Lieutenant Walter D. Har- 
rington, son of Officer Walter D. Harrington of the Cen- 
tral District. 

Two years ago he passed the Police examination No. 
2 on the list and then went into the service. Was shipped 
over to Europe and with the 104th Infantry Division saw 
service in Belgium, Holland and Germany. He was a 
supply officer and the following order issued by the Di- 
vision Commander tells how well he has done in his serv- 
ice for his country. It tells how he was awarded the 
Bronze Star Medal with citation and illustrates how for- 
tunate this city will be when he enters his duties as a 
Police Officer. 

The following is a copy of the order from the Division 
Commander in the case of Lieutenant Harrington: 



"BRONZE STAR MEDAL — CITATION" 

"By direction of the President, under the provisions 
or AR 600-45, 22 September 1943, as amended and pur- 
suant to the authority contained in paragraph 4, section 1, 
Circular No. 2, Headquarters, First United States Army, 
4 January 1945, the Bron:;e Star Medal is awarded to the 
following officer: 

"First Lieutenant Walter D. Harrington (Army Serial 
Number 01287872), Infantry, Service Company 413th 
Infantry, United States Army, for meritorious Service in 
connection with military operations in Belgium, Holland 
and Germany from 23 October 1944 to March 1945. 
Since his entry into combat, Lieutenant Harrington has 
performed his duties as battalion supply officer in a con- 
spicuously meritorious manner. At great risk to his life, 
he has supplied food, ammunition, and clothing to front 
line troops under heavy fire, on one occasion traveling one 
thousand yards across fire-swept terrain to procure radio 
batteries when all available batteries were lost in a river- 
crossing operation. Lieutenant Harrington's actions, above 
and beyond the call of duty, exemplify the finest traditions 
of the American soldier, reflecting distinct credit upon 
himself and the military service. Entered military service 
from San Francisco, California. 

"By command of the DIVISION COMMANDER." 
OFFICIAL: 

Lieutenant Harrington was born in San Francisco, and 
attended St. Ignatius High School and the University of 
San Francisco. 

He went into the army in January 1941, going first to 
Ft. Ord. His background and presence caused him to be 
selected for officers training and he was assigned to Of- 
ficers Training School at Ft. Benning and was graduated 
on July 1, 1943. 

He was sent to Camp Adair, Oregon, thence to Camp 
Carson, Colorado, and was shipped overseas, arriving in 
Europe on August 1, 1944. From then on he saw plenty 
of combat duty with the "Master race" and he has covered 
himself with glory by his bravery. 

He took the police examination while stationed at Ft. 
Ord, placing second on the eligible list. There's a place 
for him when he gets hack with the Department. 

Phone Richmond 1224 

CONTRA COSTA RAVIOLI CO. 

Home-Made Ravioli and Mushroom Sauce 

1112 MACDONALD AVENUE RICHMOND, CALIF. 



Phone SUtter 0633 



Alvin R. Campbell 



ALVIN R. CAMPBELL 

MECHANICAL CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT 

FRONT and JACKSON SAN FRANCISCO 



June. 194S 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 11 



Robert 0*Bricn*s First Year as San Mateo*s Chief 



On February 1, Chief Robert O'Brien completed his 
first year as head of the San Mateo Police Department. 
Since then he has graduated from the National Police 
Academy, having been selected by the FBI as a candidate 
for the last session of the school in 1944. In addition, he 
has had a little crime to haiiJlo tliat included a murder, 




Chief Robert O'Brien 

a $8800 grand theft of San Mateo's leading hotel and an 
$8000 bunco job, by two men and a woman who trimmed 
a victim by the old purse switch trick. 

The hotel thief, an ex-con named F. I. Lingenfelder, 
was captured in St. Louis, and was brought back to San 
Mateo, charged, tried and convicted in Redwood City, 
and sent to Folsom where he is engaged in reducing the 
size of rocks. The murder case was settled by the mur- 
derer being captured and likewise convicted and sent to 
prison. One man and the woman in the bunco job were 
arrested and on guilty pleas, were sent to prison and 
jail, the man, John Porter, to San Quentin, and the 
woman. Hazel Churchill, a year in the county jail. The 
second man is still a fugitive. 

Some of the money taken in these cases was recovered. 

These major crimes did not detract from the orderly 
and efficient conduct of Chief O'Brien's 2? police officers. 
During his first year, of the 82 automobiles reported 
stolen, all but one were recovered, and that one has since 
February been located. In addition, 18 cars taken from 
other cities were gathered in by the San Mateo Police. 

During the year four robberies, six burglaries and five 
assaults were committed in the city and arrests were 
made, clearing all "kicks". 

For arrests for misdemeanors fines totalling $8346 were 
collected through the municipal court, presided over by 
Judge Murphy. 

The Bureau of Identification under Inspector Tom 
Connors, filed ?100 fingerprints received from FBI and 



outside cities, and has mailed 173 to FBI and the same 
number to State Bureau of Identification in Sacramento. 

So it can be seen that the Police Department has main- 
tained the splendid record it has made during the past 
quarter of a century in preserving the peace for its now 
estimated 28,000 people who reside in San Mateo. 

Chief O'Brien has introduced into his departments 
many new features, learned during his attendance at the 
National Police Academy, and one of the leading is the 
erection of a modern pistol range along the lines set up by 
the Federal Bureau of Investigation. This range is located 
on the Municipal Disposal tract and has accommodation 
for ten men at a time. Every man of the Department 
shows up once a month for training and practice. The 
range is under the direction of Sergeant Manuel Trinta, 
also the radio technician for the Department. The mem- 
bers of neighboring police departments take advantage 
of the invitation to use the range to perfect themselves 
in marksmanship and the handling of small arms. 

There are three men from the San Mateo Police De- 
partment in the armed service, they being Captain Martin 
McDougal, with the Shore Patrol in the navy, and Fred 
Garner and Clarence Silver, both in the navy. Officer 
John Wilson is doing military police in the army. 

The following make up the membership of the San 
Mateo Police Department: 

Chief Robert E. O'Brien, Captain George D. Martin, 
Inspector Thomas Connors, Radio Technician Manuel 
Trinta, Sergeants John Murphy, Adrian McDaniel, Ev- 
erett Pence and Harold Bauer, Patrolmen James Smith, 
Henry Kohnen, Walter Otten, Edmund Eitel, William 
Andreasen, Zachary Whitten, Howard Darknell, Leo 
Minehan. James Casey, James Oakes, George McLean, 
Alvin Prara; Laura McLaughlin, Secretary-Clerk; Wm. 
Hallinan, School Crossing-Park; William Wood, School 
Crossing; Abbott Masters, School Crossing; Adolph Klein, 
School Crossing. 

Chief O'Brien, who has ever been a strong advocate 
of cooperation and takes an active part in the Peace 
Officers' Association of the State, of the bay area, and the 
Peninsula, following the custom introduced years ago by 
his predecessor, the late Chief Thomas Burke, will give 
the annual steak barbecue to the Bay Counties Peace Of- 
ficers' Association, possibly the last Thursday in June. 
This event draws one of the largest number of peace offi- 
cers of any meeting held around the bay during the rest 
of the year. The barbecue is held on Coyote Point and 
the program for the day contains no speeches, but, boy, 
do those who attend have a grand time. 

Phone No. 155 

THE REDWOOD ICE DELIVERY 

Modern Air-Condition Ice Refrigerators 



95 PERRY STREET 



REDWOOD CITY, CALIF. 



Page 12 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



]une, 1945 



Chief Belloni of So. S.F. Starts 22ncl Year as Head ofPoliceDept. 



South San Francisco has grown taster and had more 
war industry than any other Peninsula community, and 
has as well become the center of Northern California's 
most important air transportation headquarters. 

Twenty-eight industries have been contributing their 
products and material's to the war cffurt Headed by the 




Chief Lolis Bllloni 

Western Pipe fe? Steel Company, which at the peak of its 
employment hired some n,000 men and women in build- 
ing ships for the LInited States; then followed by the 
Bethlehem Steel Co., Belair Shipyards, which have fin- 
ished their contracts for shipbuilding; E. T. du Pont de 
Nemours, E. H. Edwards Wire Rope Co.; Enterprise 
Engine Co., Hammond Air Craft, Marine Magnesium 
Products, Metal & Thermit Corp., Mutual Engineering, 
Smith i^ Blair, South City Engineering, Reichhold Chem- 
icals, and some lesser concerns who entered the race to 
give this nation the necessary implements and materials 
to conduct this war, and with other firms, such as Indus- 
trial Minerals Products, Standard Oil, Union Oil Co., 
Pan American Air Lines, San Francisco Municipal Air- 
port, South San Francisco Union Stock Yards, Swift & 
Co., United Packing, Guy T. Atkinson, Guerin Brothers, 
South City Lumber Co., George W. Morrill Co., Cali- 
fornia Stone Co., Chubbuck Lime Co., and Latham Co., 
totalling some 'lO companies gave work for .iO,Onn people. 
The Coast Guard station on the bay. Pan American 
Air Lines, Western Air Lines, United Air Lines, and 



T. W.A. using the air port at Mills Field with Western Pipe 
& Steel and Bethlehem Steel Co. are still keeping a big 
force of workers on the job to furnish the necessary equip- 
ment for the Pacific War and the defeat of Japan. 

All this industrial activity has called for the enlarge- 
ment of housing in South City, which has had a population 
increase from 6629 in the 1940 census to 13,500 at the 
present time. To meet this demand there has been built 
in the seven-square-mile area of the town during the past 
14 months 4'iO homes and 300 more are now under con- 
struction. 

This bustling activity has naturally presented plenty of 
work for the Police Department. Chief Louis Belloni, 
who has been a member of the South San Francisco Police 
Department since January 1, 1922, and Chief since May 
19, 1924, and the men of his force have done a marvelous 
job. When the war started Chief Belloni had nine men, 
but he has been given additional help so that now he has 
14 men and a matron. 

So well has the law enforcement department of South 
San Francisco functioned — regulating traflEc, which nor- 
mally is heavy, but for the past four years at the peak 
hours for men and women going to work and leaving after 
finishing their shifts have become enormous — keeping the 
city free from crime (there being but very few felonies 
committed during the war period) and looking after the 
welfare of all permanent citizens as well as the great flock 
of transients, that the good citizens of South City have 
given material recognition for the efforts of the men who 
enforce the law in their town. The pay for patrolmen has 
been raised to $223 per month, sergeant to $2 50, assistant 
chief to $242, and the chief to $300. 

Nor is this all. It has become evident that the head- 
quarters for the Police Department have long been inade- 
quate, and the city council has arranged for a special 
election to be held in August for the purpose of voting 
on $70,000 in bonds to erect a Police building on a lot 
back of the present City Hall. The plans call for a two- 
story building, with all offices, a dormitory, and school 
room located on the first floor, and the. second floor with 
cells — one padded — quarters for women prisoners and 
juveniles, and one big tank. 

The juveniles' and women's quarters will be under the 
direction of Mrs. Emma Bianchini, wife of Assistant 
Chief Vincent Bianchini, who is now filling the post on 
a part-time basis. 

During this war the members of the Police Department 
have paid little attention to the eight hours designated 
as a tour of duty. When the early morning flow of traffic 
began coming in and when at quitting time it started 
pouring out, you would see every man on the rolls, from 
Chief down to the newest member, out doing his part 
in directing this traffic, and the result has been the finest 
controlled traffic to be found in any place in this state. 
During this great rush, morning and evening, no accidents 
f Continued on page iO) 



June, 1945 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 13 



School Safety Patrols in Review 



Boys of San Francisco's School Safety Patrols — 4,000 
of them — wearing caps and ties in their school colors, and 
the belts and brassards which mark them as young Sol- 
diers of Safety, proudly marched in review before thou- 
sands of San Franciscans, on May 1 7, at the annual parade 
and review in Kezar Stadium, Golden Gate Park. Mayor 




CIVIC LEADERS HONOR SCHOOL PATROL BOYS 
111 the reviewing stand for the annual parade and review of San 
Francisco's Schoo] Safety Patrol just before the close of the 1945' 
Spring term were (left to right): Superintendent of Schools Curtis 
E. Warren; Police Inspector Byron ] . Getchell. instructor of safety 
patrols: foseph R. Knowland, public safety chairman for the Cali- 
fornia State AutojTiobile Associtition; Mavor Roger D. Lapham: 
Chief of Police Charles W. Duilea; Police Commissioner J. W. 
Hou'ell; Police Comrriissioii President Jerd Sullivan; and Captain 
Charles F. S\elly of the Police Trajjic Bureau. 

Roger D. Lapham, members of the Police Commission, 
members of the Board of Education, and representatives 
of organisations interested in traffic safety were present in 
the reviewing stand to pay tribute to the outstanding 
record of accident prevention established by the Safety 
Patrols. 

The review marked the twenty-second consecutive year 
during which there has not been an accident to a school 
child, at a crossing protected by the Patrols. This record 
is one of which the Patrols are justly proud — a pride shared 
by the thousands of San Franciscans who turned out to pay 
tribute to the service rendered by the School Safety 
Patrols. 

Immediately following the parade and introduction of 
guests. Chief of Police Charles W. DuUea, in his capacity 
as Colonel of the Patrol Regiment, presented the merit 
awards to the battalions showing the highest degree of 
efficiency in their work during the past year. As the awards 
were announced by Chief Dullea, they were distributed to 
the school patrol captains by Police Inspector Byron J. 
Getchell, who is in charge of organization and training of 
the Patrols. 

The eleven battalions, comprising patrol members from 
126 schools, presented a brilliant and colorful spectacle 
as they marched around the field, under a cloudless sky, 
led by selected high school bands. 

Since the Patrols were organized, in 192.^, the Police 
Department has given strong support to this accident- 
prevention program, which has grown in the ensuing years 
to nation-wide proportions. Co-sponsors with the Depart- 
ment are the San Francisco Board of Education, the Cali- 



fornia State Automobile Association, and the Parent- 
Teacher Association. 

Nineteen years ago. Inspector Getchell was assigned by 
the Department to instruct the Patrol, and to him has 
fallen the task, each year, of organizing and training the 
boys in the public and parochial schools of San Francisco. 
During these years. Inspector Getchell estimates, more 
than 65,000 boys have been trained as safety patrol mem- 
bers; and many of these boys have since distinguished 
themselves in the Army, the Navy, and in civic leadership. 
In this work. Inspector Getchell is now assisted by Police 
Officer Joseph T. Kane. 

The program, following the parade, was opened with a 
brief address by Joseph R. Knowland, chairman of the 
Public Safety Committee of the California State Auto- 
mobile Association. Mr. Knowland introduced Mayor 
Lapham, who spoke in praise of the disinterested service 
rendered by patrols on behalf of their schoolmates. 

Guests of honor, introduced by Mr. Knowland, included 
Dr. Curtis E. Warren, Superintendent of Schools; Rt. 
Rev. Monsignor James T. O'Dowd, Superintendent of 
Schools, Archdiocese of San Francisco; Chief of Police 
Charles W. Dullea; Police Commissioners Jerd Sullivan 
and J. W. Howell; Mrs. George A. Hindley, First Vice- 
President, Second District, Parent-Teachers Association; 
Mrs. Kenneth C. Wilson, President, Catholic Parent- 
Teacher groups; Capt. Charles F. Skelly, commanding the 
Traffic Bureau, Police Department; Inspector Byron J. 
Getchell, Instructor of the Safety Patrols; Lloyd Wilson, 
President, San Francisco Park Commission; Sheriff Daniel 
C. Murphy of San Francisco; and Angelo J. Rossi, former 
Mayor. 

Ribbon awards provided by the California State Auto- 
mobile Association were presented to various School Safety 





.^.^^~f>*i,'*, 



POLICE CHIEF. AIDES. HEAD SAFETY REVIEW 
At attention! The regiment of 4.000 School Safety Patrol boys 
ready to start their annual parade and review in Kezar Stadium 
ufith Chief of Police Dullea. colonel of the regiment: Captain 
Charles F. S\elly. adjutant; and Inspector Byron /. Getchell, 
instructor, ready to lead the line of march. 

Patrol squads for efficiency records during the past year, 
as follows; 

First Battalion (High Schools) : Lowell, Galileo, Poly- 
technic, Mission, and St. Ignatius. 

Second Battalion: Laguna Honda, Frederick Burk, 
fCojitmed on page 4yi 



Page 14 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



June. J 945 



More Mill Valley Police Questions & Answers 



Following is another list of questions and answers rela- 
tive to law enforcement used by Chief of Police James 
McGowan (in the last issue Chief McGowan was printed 
Chief McGovern.) in keeping his regular and auxiliary 
police force fully trained on the fundamentals of the serv- 
ice they are performing for the City of Mill Valley. The 
members of the two protective agencies get together regu- 
larly and have a quiz program of their own and that is the 
reason Mill Valley officers are so well versed in the law, 
thanks to the foresight and the intelligent assemblying of 
these questions and answers: 

Q. Is possession of the stolen property alone sufficient 
to corroborate an accomplice in a theft case. 

A. No. Not unless the possession is under circumstances 
showing guilt mere possession does not amount to a guilt>' 
circumstance. 

Q. Are there any penalties for crime other than death, 
imprisonment and iine. 

A. There are some crimes which carry the penalties of 
removal from office or disqualification to hold public 
office. 

Q. If the only witness to a murder is an accomplice and 
the defendant on the witness stand testilies that the killing 
was in self-defense, is this sufficient to corroborate the 
accomplice and sustain a conviction. 

A. Yes. Any evidence in addition to that of the accom- 
plice which connects the defendant with the crime is suf- 
ficient to constitute the required corroboration. 

Q. A strike leader makes a speech during which he 
states: "Stench bombs thrown into his store, might make 
the boss listen to reason."" One of his listeners follows the 
remark as a suggestion that the act should be performed 
and, in so doing, is arrested. Can the strike leader be 
charged with any crime. 

A. It is certainly advising and encouraging the com- 
mission of a crime. 

Q. While on the witness stand, may an officer use his 
arrest report to refresh his memory as to some detail he 
has forgotten? 

A. Yes. But he should first make it known that his 
memory as to such detail can be so refreshed, under the 
law, not only the arrest report but any other paper or 
document can be used to refresh the memory. 

Q. Is it improper to refer to the dead body in a murder 
case as the "Corpus Delicti"? 

A. Yes. While the latin words suggest the idea of a 
corpse, the real meaning of "Corpus Delicti" is the com- 
plete set of elements necessary to constitute a particular 
crime. Every crime has its corpus delicti. 

Q. If an Officer is making a lawful arrest and the 
prisoner resists and attacks him, must the Officer retreat or 
endeavor to avoid a conflict before he can act in self- 
defense? 

A. No. The prisoner is the aggressor and the law of 
self-defense does not require the retreat nor the attempt to 
avoid conflict in this case. 



Q. May an Officer legally strike a person resisting arrest 
with any article whatsoever that can be considered as a 
deadly weapon? 

A. Yes. If in necessary self-defense or to overcome re- 
sistance to a lawful arrest, but the Officer may not kill in 
order to make a Misdemeanor arrest. 

Q. A motorist, informed by an Officer that he is under 
arrest, pushes the Officer off of the running board and tries 
to start his motor. What charge. 

A. Resisting an Officer; pushing the Officer off the run- 
ning board is also Assault and Battery or assault by force 
likely to produce great bodily injury. 

Q. Could a person be extradited from one state to 
another for a traffic violation? 

A. Under the law, a person may be extradited for any 
crime, even though it be only a very petty Misdemeanor, 
in actual practice, the Governors of the State will not 
authorize extradition except in case of substantial 
importance. 

Q. If articles seized on a search warrant are returned 
to the owner because of illegal seizure, what is the effect 
upon proving the articles at trial? 

A. Notwithstanding what has happened, a witness who 
saw the articles may testify to what he saw. Also the arti- 
cles may be proved by photographs taken before their 
return. 

Q. When Officer attempts to enter a place of business 
to search without a search warrant, and the proprietor 
points a loaded pistol at the Officer and tells him to stay 
out, who is wrong? 

A. The Officer. Because he had no legal right to search. 
The proprietor is within his rights in resisting the unlaw- 
ful act. 

Q. A Peace Officer sells his own registered pistol to a 
I Continued on page 37 I 



HOTEL BELLEVUE 

GEARY at TAYLOR 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone UNderhill 4433 



DUGGAN'S 

FUNERAL SERVICE 



3434 SEVENTEENTH STREET 
Near Valencia Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone Yukon 1460 



O. L. RUSSUM 

WHOLESALE LUMBER 



I 12 MARKET STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



June. J 945- POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 

Modesto^s New Police Chief 



Page 15 



Urban H. Pickering is the new Chief of Police of Mo- 
desto. He was appointed to that position on March 7, 
following the sudden death of veteran and able Chief 
Elmer E. Arington. 

In appointing Captain Pickering as Chief of Police 
the City Council gave recognition to one of its own police 
force, who for over ten years has been a member of the 
Department. During those ten years and more — he was 
appointed a patrolman on July 3, 1934, the new Chief 




Chief Urban H. Pickering 

took advantage of the opportunities offered in law en- 
forcement for advancement. By hard work and construc- 
tive study he progressed through all the ranks of the 
Modesto Police Department. When he joined up he was 
assigned to traffic and did a wonderful job in this assign- 
ment. So well did he perform his new duties that he won 
a promotion to Sergeant on August 1, 1937. He kept up 
his record for efficiency as a Sergeant, and by intelligent 
study, topped the list of those taking the examination for 
Captain. He was appointed to the highest commissioned 
rank on March 16, 1941. 

When Chief Arington passed on, his selection as the 
successor of the dead chief was a natural. His record of 
achievement, his loyalty to his city, his popularity, and his 
understanding of the laws of the land, and what should be 
done to enforce these laws had singled him out as a 
foremost law enforcement officer. 

Chief Pickering, who was born in Hoxie, Kansas, on 
June 3, 1899, has had considerable experience in meeting 
the general public. He was a baseball player, and by his 
ability on the sand lots he was ushered into the profes- 
sional ranks of ball players in 192 3 when he played for 
the Oakland Baseball Team of the Coast League. He was 
an outfielder, and he handled the work as an outfielder so 
well that the major leagues called him. After six years 
with Oakland he went to the New York Giants in 1928 



and later worked with the Boston Red Sox of the Amer- 
ican League for three years, during which time he played 
at third base. 

Deciding that he had plenty of baseball, and that the 
years were catching up with him as a ball player, he fig- 
ured he had better get into something more secure. Com- 
ing west he finally landed in Modesto and saw the oppor- 
tunity he was looking for as a member of Modesto's Police 
Department. He is a great favorite with the residents of 
that thriving San Joaquin Valley city, and especially with 
the younger folks, and his influence with these youngsters 
has been responsible to a great degree in keeping juvenile 
delinquency so low in Modesto that it is nowhere a prob- 
lem as It is m many other communities throughout this 
nation. 

LT. EDWARD DULLEA, U.S.N., 
HOME ON LEAVE 

Lieutenant Edward Dullea, USN, second eldest son of 
Chief and Mrs. Charles W. Dullea, arrived in San Fran- 
cisco last month to take the first leave he has had since he 
joined the Navy in 1941, before the Pearl Harbor Jap 
sneak. He has been on duty in the Pacific war zones and 
has seen plenty of action. 

While he was mighty glad to be here to visit his parents 
and his young wife, the highlights of his return to his native 
city was making the acquaintance of his young son, Ed- 
ward Broderick Dullea. It was the first time he has seen 
his heir and he'll be in there pitching when he returns to 
sea duty so this war will be over quick and he can be back 
to see his little son grow up. 

Lieutenant Dullea enlisted in the Navy and has served 
so well and applied his talents so aptly that he has reached 
his present rank and we predict that before this war is over 
he will add more stripes to his coat sleeve. 

Phone EVergreen 9 72 3 

HOTEL CLEMENT 



Outside Rooms - Reasonable Prices 



524 CLEMENT STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone overland 5 72 7 



Bill Berweger, Prop. 



BILL'S DELICATESSEN 

Homemade Salads - Assorted Cold Meats - All Kinds of Imported 

and Domestic Delicacies - Local Beer and Wines 
118 WEST PORTAL AVENUE SAN FRANCISCO 



SHAWS CONFECTIONS 

122 WEST PORTAL AVENUE 744 CLEMENT STREE i 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Compliments of 

PETRI WINE CO. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



C. E. Hubacher, Prop. 



ORDWAY 8C BRENNAN 



PUBLIC WEIGHERS 



800 SIXTH STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Page 16 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Jime, 1945 



Fitzpatrick New Secretary For Aid Association 



When Officer Matthew Carberry resigned from the 
San Francisco PoHce Department he gave up his extra 
job of recording secretary of the Widows' and Orphans' 
Aid Association. This left a vacancy that posed a problem 
for the members of this great organization of police offi- 
cers, past and present, for they faced a hard task of getting 
a man who would serve as ably and efficiently as Officer 




Inspector Thos. F. Fitzpatrick 

Carberry. But the boys who had the job of working out 
this problem came up with a man for the position whom 
it is conceded will do as fine a job in keeping the records 
of the Association as did his predecessor. 

The man President Michael Reilly, Financial Sec- 
retary Owen Fogarty and Treasurer John Butler selected 
is Inspector Thomas F. Fitzpatrick. 

Inspector Fitzpatrick is a son of retired Officer Thomas 
F. Fitzpatrick, Sr., who took his pension over 20 years 
ago, after serving with distinction as a policeman and 
today whole and hearty and a member of the WOAS. 
He is now assigned to the General Works Detail of the 
Bureau of Inspectors, under Inspector Sidney B. DeBose. 

He was appointed a Police Officer in 19J6, and served 
on the radio patrol in every station of the city, served one 
year as a Motorcycle Officer, and during this assignment, 
suffered an accident which laid him up for a spell with 
a broken bone in his back. During his convalescence he 
did three months in the Communications Bureau. When 
he got over the results of this accident he resumed his 
radio patrol work and did a hitch with the Special Service 
Detail. In 1940 he was brought into the Inspectors Bu- 
reau. He soon was assigned to the General Works Detail 
where he displayed keen ability in dealing with the many 
duties of that unit, especially those dealing with subversive 



activities. He keeps the records for the Detail and these 
records are a fine example of exactness and completeness. 

Inspector Fitzpatrick is a native of this city. He fin- 
ished his grammar and high school education and figured 
he might make a lawyer out of himself. So he entered 
the University of San Francisco. However, he saw the 
urgency of having some essential financial income, so after 
two years he quit and joined the Police Department. Dur- 
ing his college years he took a prominent part in many of 
the University's activities. He won the light heavyweight 
boxing championship of the hilltop college. 

He is a well built specimen of manhood, and takes 
most seriously any task assigned to him. In his new and 
added duties as recording secretary he will give his work 
the same intelligent, efficiency aiid enthusiastic attention 
he has given his work as a Police Officer. 

Shortly after joining the Police Department the then 
young Officer was married and the couple have three 
daughters, aged seven, six and one. 

To illustrate his popularity with the members of the 
Widows' and Orphans' Aid Association, we point qut 
that he was given a big vote and elected a member of 
the Association's board of trustees. The affairs of the 
Association will be in capable hands with Officer Fitz- 
patrick serving as recording secretary. 



Atlas Imperial 

Diesel Engine 

Company 



Executive Offices 



102 NEW MONTGOMERY ST. 
SAN FRANCISCO 



June, J 945 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 17 



Phone Piedmont 5700 



ZOMBIE 
VILLAGE 

Chinese and American 
FOOD 

Glassed in Tropical Garden 



65th and San Pablo Ave. 
Oakland, Calif. 



Phone HUmboldt 0512 



Clyde O. Sweet 

REALTOR 



COLLEGE at BROADWAY 
OAKLAND, CALIF. 



•»TV&ii-*i!r<riViWWhi**iWrii!rT^*iiTWi-TWr(V** 



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BUY 

WAR BONDS 

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STAMPS 



■^l}JfJfJ^lfJfJ}JfJf.i}.i}^}JfJ}.i}J}J!}Jf.i}JfJ}jy}J^i^^ 



SCHOR 

Manufacturing 
Co. 



203 South Linden Avenue 

South San Francisco 

California 



Page 18 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 

Patrolling a Police Beat 



June. 1945 



(Conclusion) 

The fourth requisite is the prevention of crime. There 
are patrolmen in every department who conscientiously 
patrol their heats during their tours of duty, try the doors 
frequently, talk to no one, and as we know, are not good 
policemen. I have in mind a fellow whom we called "Gal- 
loping Jack". He walked himself to death. On his beat 
there were a number of all-night cigar stores, taxicab of- 
fices, and restaurants. By stopping occasionally and con- 
versing with the cigar clerks, taxicab drivers and restaurant 
employees he would have developed invaluable sources of 
information that would have been of great assistance to 
himself in the discharge of his duties, and also to the 
members of the Detective Bureau who depend so much 
for the successful solution of criminal cases on the uni- 
formed patrolman. Don't be a Galloping Jack. 

In speaking of the Detective Bureau, there should be 
a healthy rivalry, notice I said "healthy", not a jealous 
rivalry, between the uniformed force and the plain clothes 
detail of a police department. Cooperate fully with the 
members of the Detective Bureau, we are all striving for 
the same goal, efficient police service, but if you can, to 
use the vernacular, "beat them to the punch" and com- 
pletely gather, mark and preserve the evidence and 
through your knowledge of the law and the rules of 
evidence successfully prosecute and convict the defendant, 
you will be respected by your superiors as competent of- 
ficers. Remember that assignments to the Detective Bu- 
reau are made from the uniformed force. Wise executives 
are always on the lookout for good material for their 
Detective Bureaus. Use your initiative, powers of obser- 
vation and spirit of cooperation in the patrolling of your 
beats, and you will not alone prevent crime, but you will 
also indicate to your superiors that you are good Detective 
Bureau material. 

The fifth duty is the arrest and prosecution of offenders. 
In order to know the law, one must study the law; more 
policemen get into trouble through not knowing the law 
and the abuse of liquor than from any other causes; for 
instance, how many policemen have been successfully sued 
because they did not know the law of arrest? The cure-all 
is that twenty minutes a day referred to above. If the 
District Attorneys are to successfully prosecute cases they 
must have the necessary evidence. The time and place to 
gather evidence is immediately after the crime is commit- 
ted. Question the defendant and witnesses: reduce their 
statements to writing. Have your physical evidence in 
such shape that you can readily identify it in court. Coop- 
erate to the utmost with the District Attorney. In the 
final analysis it is his responsibility to present the evidence. 

The sixth and last, is, "Serve the Public". Remember 
they are paying the freight. We serve the public by ren- 
dering efficient police service. Be a salesman for your 
department by rendering courteous, efficient police serv- 
ice. A little act, such as escorting a blind or aged person 



across the street, is seen by hundreds of citizens. From 
the selfish aspect, remember if we are going to improve 
our conditions we must have the public on our side. 

Some of you gentlemen from small departments are 
probably saying to yourselves that these suggestions may 
apply to a large department but nothing ever happens in 
my town so why should I bother about learning the law 
and the technique of patrolling. The fact of the matter is 
that it can happen in your town, and referring to a major 
crime, and it probably will; if the officials of your town 
were of the opinion that major crime was not a problem, 
it would be ridiculous to be employing you to prevent 
something that will never happen. The patrolman in a 
small town must know more of police techniques than a 
patrolman in a large city. The large city patrolman, if he 
does not know the answer to a police problem has a 
number of superiors that he can consult, but usually in a 
small town the officer is the patrolman and detective, and 
must in fact double in brass in all the phases of police 
work. A practical example of the efficiency and investiga- 
tive ability of a small county sheriff may be in point. 
Many years ago a telegram was received by our depart- 
ment from the Sheriff of Nevada County stating that one 
Doris Compos, was wanted on a charge of murder. This 
woman had shot a man in the small town of Floriston 
located near the border of the State of Nevada. My part- 
ner and I arrested this woman in the North Beach area 
of San Francisco and wired this information to the Sheriff. 
A statement was taken from the woman and she admitted 
the killing, claiming that she shot in self-defense. I was 
subpoenaed to appear at the trial which was held in Na- 
tional City, the County seat. On arriving in National City 
in the spirit of cooperation because I had had some pre- 
vious experience in murder trials I thought that some 
suggestions were in order. I suggested to Sheriff Carter 
that it would be a good idea if a diagram was drawn of 
the scene of the murder; the Sheriff showed me the dia- 
gram that he had prepared; my next suggestion was that 
the Autopsy Surgeon be interviewed so that there would 
be no slip-up in proving the corpus delicti; the Sheriff 
took from his desk drawer a small glass vial, stuffed with 
cotton and the bullet that was extracted from the body 
of the victim. Sheriff Carter also had a statement made 
by the Autopsy Suregon as to what he would testify to; 
there wasn't any question that the corpus delicti would 
be properly established; the Sheriff was then asked if the 
victim had died immediately; he stated that the deceased 
had lived for twenty-four hours; I asked him if he had 
taken a dying statement from him; he produced the dying 
statement with the foundation for its introduction pro- 
perly laid. The "Big City Detective" thought that it was 
about time he shut his mouth because the small county 
Sheriff knew all the answers. 

The probability is, that this was the first murder case 
(Continued on page i9 ) 



June, J 945 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 19 



Officer Carberry Resigns to Take Job 
With County Assessor 



Officer Matthew Carherry has resigned from the San 
Francisco Police Department and has taken a position 
with City Assessor Russell Wolden as administrative 
assistant. 

The Police Department of San Francisco loses an able 
member, a young man who, during ten years and nine 




Matthew Carberry 

months as a police officer, did more to advance the inter- 
ests of the department membership than any single man 
you can mention. 

With the retirement of Sergeant George Kopman as 
recording secretary of the Widows' and Orphans' Aid 
Association Officer Carberry, who joined the force on 
July 1, 1944, was appointed to fill the vacancy occasioned 
by the retirement. At the following election he was elected 
to the post and each succeeding year he was retained with- 
out opposition. 

A graduate of San Francisco College, specializing in 
government administration, he brought into play the 
things he learned at the university. He handled the details 
of the campaign for a war-period increase in police sal- 
aries, and for the fight to get the fine pension voted at 
the last election. He was the moving spirit in the forma- 
tion of the San Francisco Police Officers Association, and 
was its first president, and when he gave up his police 
job was its secretary. 



Officer Carberry has a pleasing manner, and the 
ability to break-down figures and present his arguments 
of a cause he is interested in, in a most convincing man- 
ner. In the two elections he took such an active and suc- 
cessful interest, he was responsible more than anyone 
else in getting influential associations, organizations and 
business and labor interests behind the propositions being 
placed before the voters. 

In the annual concert and ball of the Police Aid As- 
sociation he contributed the same energy he did on these 
other occasions, and in this organization he was deeply 
interested and introduced many things to make it even 
better than it has been during its long history. 

He served as president back in 1940, the youngest 
officer ever to hold that position. 

We predict that you will hear much more of Matthew 
Carberry and it will be of his attaining further success. 
As the saying goes in sporting circles, "he's got what it 
takes." 



Phone sutler 9838 



Georg Agostini 



Lesare tiecucci 



COLOMBO MARKET GRILL 



626 FRONT STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



BOB'S CAFE 

BEER - SANDWICHES 



42 1 DRUM STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



MATTEUCCI & VANNUCCI 8c SON 

643 FRONT STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

HOTEL GOLDEN EAGLE 

ALBERT CANTEGRIT 
402 BROADWAY SAN FRANCISCO 

BROADWAY MARKET 

VEGETABLES and GROCERIES 

392 BROADWAY SAN FRANCISCO 

M. P. FINE FOODS 

BELMONT, CALIF. 

Menlo Food Center Stanford Park Market 

MENLO PARK. CALIF. MENLO PARK. CALIF. 



Phone 5-1302 



Joe Maraschin. Prop. 



SAN MATEO FLORISTS AND NURSERY 

PLANTS and SHRUBS - FLORAL ARTISTS 

Open Evenings - We Telegraph Flowers 
2 129 EL CAMINO REAL SAN MATEO. CALIF. 

Phone DElaware 2628 

San Francisco Auto and Trailer Court 

On Bayshore Highway and City Limits 

701 SUNNYDALE AVENUE SAN FRANCISCO 



Page 20 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



June, 1945 




(Copyright, 1931, 2-0 Publishing Co.) 
Founded 1922 

Business Office: 465 Tenth Street 

San Francisco, California 

Phone MArket 7110 

An Official Police News and Educational Magazine Devoted 
to the Interests of 

SAN FRANCISCO POLICE DEPARTMENT 
WIDOWS' AND ORPHANS' AID ASSOCIATION 
BAY COUNTIES' PEACE OFHCERS' ASSOCIATION 
PENINSULA POLICE OFFICERS' ASSOCIATION 
NORTHERN CALIFORNIA POLICE COMMUNICA- 
TION OFFICERS' ASSOCIATION 

Published Monthly by 

San Francisco Police and Peace Officers' Journal 

S. F. Police Short Wave Radio Call KGPD 

OUR FOREIGN EXCHANGES 

THE GARDA REVIEW 2 Crow St., Dublin, Ireland 

ALERTA, A. V. JUAREZ Desp. 6, Mexico, D. F. 

REVISTA DE POLICIA 

Rioja, 666. Buenos Aires, Republic of Argentine, S. A. 

CONSTABULARY GAZETTE Belfast, Ireland 

POLICE NEWS New South Wales 

POLICE JOURNAL Wellington, New Zealand 

Make All Checks Payable to San Francisco Police Journal 

OPIE L. WARNER Business Manager and Editor 

SUBSCRIPTION TERMS — $3 a year, payable in advance; 2Sc 
a number. In Canada, $4 a year. Remittance must be made 
by Post Office or Express Money Order, by Registered Letter, 
or by Postage Stamps of 2-cent denomination, or by check. 

IMPORTANT NOTICE — Do not subscribe to S. F. POLICE 
JOURNAL through agents unknown to you personally, or 
who cannot present proper credentials on our stationery. 

ADVERTISING RATES on application, 30 



S.F.P.D. OVER TOP IN WAR 
BOND DRIVE 

The San Francisco Police Department is going over the 
top in this great Seventh War Loan Bond Drive with its 
quota, fixed at $600,000. Chief Charles W. Dullea placed 
Director Michael GaiFey in charge of the drive for the 
Police Department, and every member from Captain down 
to the newest patrolman was made an active war bond 
salesman. Every district of the city is being covered by this 
big army of patriotic officers and on the Hth of this month 
the sales had passed the $700,000 mark. 

Central District, under Captain Arthur Christiansen, 
tops all departments of the force with a sale of some $220,- 
000. Headquarters company is second with $110,000. 

Every member of the Department will continue the 
intensive campaign and it seems well on its way to go over 
the million-dollar mark. 



Federal Security Agency. The purpose of the meeting was 
to discuss plans to see that the men returning from the 
European war and those who have a furlough prior to 
going to the Pacific area combat zones are given the same 
protection from prostitution that has prevailed throughout 
the country since the beginning of the war. 

Chief Dullea is the only peace officer from the West 
Coast on the Advisory committee. 



CHIEF STONE OF STATE 
D. OF I. DIES 

Chief Charles H. Stone of the California Division of 
Criminal Identification and Investigation died last month 
in Sacramento. He has been identified with this important 
unit of our state government since it was first established. 
He succeeded as Chief, Clarence Morrill, who passed 
away some year ago, and since he has had charge of the 
mass of work this division has done he has made many 
improvements, increased the headquarters in Sacramento 
and has contributed to the solution of many crimes 
throughout the state, which his force of men had been 
asked by peace officers to help out on. 

The State Division is one of the best of any throughout 
this country and is second only to the FBI in the great 
mass of records of crimes and criminals and assistance given 
law enforcement. 

C. H. McClellan, former Police Chief of Long Beach 
and now head of the investigation work for Attorney 
General Robert Kenny, is temporarily in charge of the 
State Division, and will act as chief until the Personnel 
Board holds an examination to fill the vacancy caused by 
the death of Chief Stone. 

Compliments of 

NORTHERN CLUB 



1108 VALENCIA STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone GArfield 7140 



E. CLEMENTS HORST & CO. 



235 PINE STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone GArfield 7455 



Fred Sumner, Manager 



A. C. HORN PRODUCTS COMPANY 

WATERPROOFING 

252 TOWNSEND STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone Mission 4640 THOMAS B. RICKEY 

GOLDEN GATE DISTRIBUTING CO. 

WINES and LIQUORS 
wholesale Candies, Cigars and Cigarettes 

884 VALENCIA STREET, at 20lh Street SAN FRANCISCO 



SWIFT 8C COMPANY 

ICE CREAM PLANT 



420 SIXTH STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CHIEF DULLEA ATTENDS 

WASHINGTON, D. C, MEETING p,_ ^^,.„ „oo-,.2^3 

Chief Charles W. Dullea spent three days in Washing- AMERICAN POULTRY CO. 

ton, D. C, the latter part of last month, attending a meet- wholesale Live and Dressed poultry 

ing of the National Police Advisory Committee of the »" "avis street san francisco 



June, J 945 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 21 



Police Reserve Formed — Changed From 
Auxiliary Police — Drawing Pay 



Pursuant to the provisions of Ordinance No. 3108 of 
the Board of Supervisors, which is now in full force and 
effect, the San Francisco Police Department has organized 
a Police Reserve in its nine respective companies. The said 
reserve is limited to eight hundred men in compliance with 
the ordinance. 

Applications for entry into the Police Reserve have been 
distributed to the various companies. Instruct the members 
of your respective commands acting as liaisons to the 
Auxiliary' Police to mimediately commence taking appli- 
cations. 

Priority of applicants is as follows; 

(a) Present active members of the Au.xiliary Police. 

(b) Present inactive members of the Auxiliary Police. 

(c) Past members of the Auxiliary Police. 

(d) Others. 

With the creation of the Reserve, the following named 
members of the Auxiliary Police were appointed members 
of the San Francisco Reserve with the following ranks and 
assignments : 

Administrative Group — Mervyn D. Sullivan, Supervis- 
ing Captain; Daniel P. Tinney, Captain of Personnel; 
Harold R. Harlan, Captain of Special Events: Joseph 
Galeoto, Captain of Juvenile Welfare; Ray Mullin, Cap- 
tain (To act as Secretary) ; George Heckert, Lieutenant 
(In charge of Master Files) ; Adolph Buck, Lieutenant 
(Assistant to Captain Harlan) ; Christian Maasberg, Lieu- 
tenant (Assistant to Captain Mullin). 

Central Station — Walter N. Steele, Senior Lieutenant. 

Southern Station — James Macauley, Senior Lieutenant. 

Potrero Station — Richard R. Farrell, Senior Lieutenant. 

Mission Station — Fred Coulman, Senior Lieutenant. 

Northern Station — Eli Rosen, Senior Lieutenant. 

Golden Gate Park Station — George L. Banks, Senior 
Lieutenant. 

Richmond Station — Louis Frandsen, Senior Lieutenant. 

Ingleside Station — Earl L. Hampton, Senior Lieutenant. 

Taraval Station — Charles A. Forbes, Senior Lieutenant. 

Traffic Bureau — Fred C. Erbacher, Senior Lieutenant. 

Each member of the Reser\'e is entitled to a salary of 
$L00 per hour of active duty up to and including 50 
hours. When said member reports off duty to the Lieu- 
tenant of Police in each station, after having completed a 
given assignment, he shall complete, sign, and turn in for 
the liaison's attention a "Compensation Request" card 
(Form PR7), showing his name, rank, star, assignment, 
tour of duty, and number of hours performed. Said liaison, 
not later than 24 hours, shall attest to the assignment and 
hours by signing in the space provided, whereupon he 
shall submit said card to the Police Captain of the district 
for his signature and forwarding to the payroll division of 
the department. The payroll division shall then make up 



from these cards a semi-monthly payroll by companies. 
Upon securing the endorsement of pay checks, the liaison 
officer shall make a record and forward the checks in a 
wax-sealed envelope to the Deputy Chief's Office, marked 
"Attention Reserve Uniform Fund." These checks will 
then be deposited in a local bank to provide the necessary 
funds for the purchasing of the new uniforms, stars, equip- 
ment, etc., now on order. 

Each member of the Reserve, as provided by ordinance, 
is considered a city employee while receiving the salary for 
his >0 hours: therefore, in keeping with the Charter of 
the City and County, no member shall receive compensa- 
tion in excess of time earned. 

Rules and Regulations of the San Francisco Police Re- 
serve have been printed in book form for distribution. 

The Auxiliary Police will remain intact as before, but 
shall consist of non-active members. It will he a further 
reserve of manpower to aid the department in the event of 
enemy action, serious disasters, or other related emer- 
gencies. All records of the personnel remaining in said 
Auxiliary Police shall be kept in order and up to date, but 
separate from the files of the Police Reserve. 



Phone ORdway 3 72 7 



Wallace E. Scott 



SCOTT REFRIGERATION CO. 

Successors to Scott-Buttner Refrigeration Co., Ltd. 
COMMERCIAL REFRIGERATION - CONTRACTORS - ENGINEERS 

1655 PINE STREET, Near Van Ness Avenue SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone HEmlock 5050-505 1 



S. Forni 



PACIFIC COAST BRANDS 

Blanco Vista • Vino Vista - Cal-Best - Club Chauteau - Cal Vista 

Forni's Vermouth - Bonded Wineries 4322-3587 

2 700 18ih STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone Mission 5&^7 



Call and Delivered - Free Estimates 



APEX VENETIAN BLIND SERVICE CO. 



1367 VALENCIA STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Compliments of 

DICK & CLAUDE VALLERGA 



401 SIXTH STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CLUB SHANGHAI 

FLOOR SHOW and DANCING 
Every Nite 9 P.M. 



453 GRANT AVENUE 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone EXbrook 0833 



E. Binello 



B. Ro 



COIT TOWER GROCERY 



Wine - DELICATESSEN - Liquor 

15 12 GRANT AVENUE SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone sutler 864 7 



O. Baron 



A. Colombini 



TRY us — WE HAVE IT 

CAPRI RESTAURANT 

The Coziest Spot in North Beach 



1326 GRANT AVENUE 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Page 22 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



June, 1945 



/ • 

Jvst 5aK..."G0UGH AT MARKET" 

and you're there 

Shop the easy way. Streetcars J, K. L. M, N, 6, 7 and 17 stop 
in front of our door. 

Get a fine Fleecedown mattress at our easy to reach manufactur- 
ing store. Airflex. experts in sleeping needs, will advise and help 
you select the mattress exactly suited to you. 
If you drive we have a large free parking lot adjoining our store. 
Mattresses shipped free of charge to any railroad point in the 
United States. 

AIRFLEX 

EDWARD McROSKEY MATTRESS CO. 

1687 MARKET STREET • SAN FRANCISCO 

Opposite Gough Street Free Parking 



Phone ATwater 0176 



Scripps Marine Engine Distributors 



PLAY AND RELAX at . . . 




PLAYLAND 




at the BEACH 




Located at Ocean Beach near the 
Cliff House and fanned Seal R 


historic 
ocks. 


Home of Thrill-Provoking Rides . . . Unique 
fronting fhe Blue Pacific . . . Oceans of Fun 


Restaurants 
for Everyone! 


Owned and Operated by 

WHITNEY BROTHERS 





SALTER BROTHERS 



OSWALD MACHINE WORKS 

General Machine Work, Marine, Gas and Diesel Engines, 
Stem Bearings and Propeller Work 

956 EVANS AVENUE SAN FRANCISCO 

PIONEERS IN BUSINESS 

McBLAIN'S 

SAN FRANCISCO: 
Phone WAInut 9765 — 2 164 CHESTNUT STREET, near Pierce Street 
Phone Mission 1357.1358 — 3041 MISSION STREET, near 26th St. 

Complinients of 

McKALE'S INC. 

SERVICE STATION SYSTEM 



703 MARKET STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone UNderhill 1826 

WALTER GORDON 

Real Estate - Insurance 

4 14 CASTRO STREET. Next to Bank of America SAN FRANCISCO 
Compliments of 

WALTER J. CARPENETI 

ATTORNEY 

333 MONTGOMERY STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Dinner and Dance at . . . 

ED'S BUNGALOW 

Specializing in Fine Italian Dinners and American Dishes 
BEER - WINE - LIQUORS 

CLEARLAKE OAKS. Lake County 



CALIFORNIA 



ACME INN 

DRINKS YOU LIKE - DINING - DANCING 



CLEARLAKE HIGHLANDS, Lake County 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone Nice I 7 1 Beard & Brown 

Complete Fishing Facilities, Boats and Motors, Modern Cabins, Gas 

SPORTSMAN HARBOR 

Good Foods - Soft Drinks - Beer and Wines 

NICE. LAKE COUNTY CALIFORNIA 



PHOTO ENGRAVERS 

655 COMMERCIAL STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone SUtter 695 Karl Snow, Asst. Manager 

A . M. BLUME R 

FERTILIZING MATERIALS AND MINERAL FEEDS 
"Fertilization Produces Quality" 

433 CALIFORNIA STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone EXbrook 7308 



Tailor Made Blues Made to Order 



GUS KROESEN 

NAVAL TAILOR OVER 35 YEARS 

242 MARKET STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone ORdway 5430 



BUY WAR BON DS 



WAYSIDE INN 

BILL and FLORENCE PHILABAUM 



CLEARLAKE HIGHLANDS, Lake County 



CALIFORNIA 



J. C. Miller. Mgr. 

AUSTIN'S RESORT 

on CLEARLAKE 
Boating, Swimming, Dancing, Fishing, Cabins, Camp Grounds 



CLEARLAKE HIGHLANDS P. O. 



CALIFORNIA 



vis Minor. Owner 



MORGAN SPRING CO. 

Manufacturers 
HEAVY DUTY SPRINGS 

670 GOLDEN GATE AVENUE SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone SUtter 184 7 Weighing, Strapping. Stenciling. Reconditioning Phone Clearlake Oaks I 



HARBOR INN 

Good Food and Fine Liquors - Reasonable 
CLEARLAKE PARK, Lake County CALIFORNIA 

Mrs. Henrietta Rice, Owner 



PIER 5 



MacNICOL & CO. 

Service Contractors - Certified Public Weighmaster 

Labeling. Forwarding 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone GArfield 065 Wendel NIcolaus, Mgr. 

ROBERT KIRK, LTD. 

3 7 POST STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



Compliments of 

McKUNE METAL PRODUCTS CO. 

266 TEHAMA STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



BEEHIVE CAFE 

Cabins - Grocery - Finest of Meals and Liquors 

P. O. BOX 80 CLEARLAKE OAKS. Lake Co.. CALIF. 

Phone DOuglas 9835 Scandinavian Seaman's Club Upstairs 

Charlie Dahlstrom's 

SPOKANE INN 

Lunch With Beer - Imported Liquors and Wines 

348 DRUMM STREET, Near Jackson SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone DOuglas 9797 Formerly the OLD SHIP 

MONTE CARLO CAFE AND HOTEL 

Plate Lunch 30c - Beer, Wines and Liquors 
298 PACIFIC AVENUE SAN FRANCISCO 



June, 1945 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 23 



Inspector M. E. Desmoncl*s Son Honored 



Another member of the San Francisco Pohce Depart- 
ment has received news that makes hmi feel very prideful 
because he is the father of a son who has served in our 
Armed Forces with honor and won medals marking 
especial service for bravery, efficiency and loyalty. This 
month Inspector Michael Desmond, veteran member of the 




M. E. Desmond, Jr. 

Bureau of Inspectors, received word from his son, Michael 
E. Desmond, Jr., who is in the Mediterranian War The- 
ater. In the letter there was inclosed an Army press release 
telling of the fine work the younger member of the Des- 
mond family has performed in a special field of activity. 
Young Desmond is a special agent on the Homicide Squad 
of the Criminal Investigation Division and, as the follow- 
ing release from Allied Force Headquarters in Italy re- 
veals, he has demonstrated keen ability in carrying out his 
duties. He evidently has inherited some of the investigatory 
knowledge of his father. While Michael Desmond, Sr., 
never had the benefit of a college education, which he saw 
his son did have, yet he has piled up a record for solving 
many a baffling case, bringing in many a lawbreaker and 
seeing that they were taken out of circulation, that but few 
law-enforcement officers have achieved in their life time. 

Phone EXbrook 165 5 

A. FREDERICKSEN CO. 

TEXTILES 

820 MISSION STRRET SAN FRANCISCO 



For over 30 years he has covered the waterfront and but 
no man knows that picturesque and busy area better than 
he. The following releases sent specially to The Police 
.■\ND Peace Officers" Journ.^l tell the story of this young 
San Francisco boy; 

"ALLIED FORCE HEADQUARTERS, Italy — Mi- 
chael E. Desmond, Jr., son of Inspector and Mrs. Michael 
Desmond, 763 31st Avenue, San Francisco, Calif., has 
been doing detective work in the Mediterranean Theater 
of Operations as an agent for the Criminal Investigation 
Division. As a special agent on the Homicide Squad, he 
has had a hand in the cracking of many major cases and, 
in one instance, helped solve a five-month-old murder. 

"The CID's job is to investigate criminal acts committed 
by members of the American army, and by others to the 
injury of the American soldier and the American govern- 
ment. Since the beginning of its operations overseas, the 
CID has recovered millions of dollars worth of U. S. 
Government property, restricted black market activity, 
and investigated major crimes. 

"Overseas twenty-two months. Agent Desmond wears 
the Mediterranean Theater Ribbon with tv^JO Battle Par- 
ticipation Stars, the Good Conduct Medal, and the Unit 
Meritorious Service award. He attended St. Mary's Col- 
lege, Moraga, California, and was employed by the Rail- 
way Express Agency, San Francisco, prior to his entrance 
into the service." 



BRADY 8C DOWLING 



2737 MISSION STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



THE TWIN DRAGON 



HAROLD KOE 



158 WAVERLY PLACE 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone YUkon 1892 



A. A. Pedemonte 



BROAD'WAY LIQUOR STORE 

WE HAVE THE MOST POPULAR BRANDS 



43 7 BROADWAY 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone EXbrook 5 153 



BEAUTY SHOP SUPPLY CO. INC. 



LOS ANGELES - HONOLULU 
5 1 FIRST STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone GArfield 8524 



Clayton Murray, Manager 



NEW ADMIRAL HOTEL 

Rooms Reasonable - "Make it your home" 

190 EMBARCADERO SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone Skyline 6397 - 4 144 



Bonded Member F. T. D. 



THE DEN 

FOUNTAIN LUNCH - CANDY 
2506 FILLMORE STREET 



PINELLI'S FLOWERLAND 

Richmond's Distinctive Florist 

Flowers Wired All Over the World - Flowers For All Occasions 

SAN FRANCISCO ^ ' ■♦ CLEMENT STREET, bt. 8th and 9th Aves. SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone GArfield 7695 

THE MANDARIN ART COMPANY 

Importers of EARL'l' CHINESE ARTS 
564-566 GRANT AVE., Cor. California Street SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone HEmlock 4222 



Compliments of 



Bay Cities Ice and Cold Storage Co. 



715 BRANNAN STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Page 24 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



June, 1945 



PRESIDENT TRUMAN'S ADDRESS 

I Continued from page 6) 
record in America is the alarming increase in juvenile de- 
linquency. Youngsters, still in their 'teen age, constitute 
one of the major groups of our criminal offenders. For the 
average layman, it is difficult to realize that the most fre- 
quent arrests in any male age group is seventeen, eighteen 
and nineteen years, respectively. 

"In a review of the 1944 figures, it is especially shocking 
to learn that, in a democracy where the voting privilege is 
denied until the age of twenty-one, our youth under 
twenty-one years committed 35 per cent of all robberies, 
52 per cent of burglary, 3i per cent of larceny and 63 per 
cent of auto thefts. Of 110,000 crimes committed against 
property, fully 40 per cent of the offenders were less than 
twenty-one years old! What a sad commentary upon the 
training of the youth of America ! 

"As ofiicers charged with the duty to protect society 
from crime, you have a most serious responsibility. You 
will require the active cooperation of ail law-abiding citi- 
zens. For the most effective discharge of your duty, you 
need the help of every social agency created to improve 
living conditions in your community. 

"It is far better and cheaper to prevent crime than to 
pursue the criminal, and, after detention, try to rehabili- 
tate him. For example, to direct the excess energy of youth 
to the gymnasium of a Boys' Club may prevent his joining 
a juvenile gang. 

"The future of America depends upon the character 
and quality of our youth. The primary problem is one of 
home-training, general education and character-building. 
However, as leaders in the cause of a progressive order, 
you should actively promote and help coordinate all wel- 
fare and social agencies which can be utilized to ease your 
burden. 

"Present social conditions naturally reflect the great dis- 
locations caused by the war. Mothers with patriotic pur- 
poses work in war plants, while their neglected children 
become social problems. The strong guidance of fathers 
in service is missing in many homes. Children, who should 
be in school, are working long hours and, though helping 
the war effort, sometimes associate with the wrong kind of 
people. Many spend their salaries seeking release from 
wartime emotions. 

"Americans dare not wait until juvenile delinquency 
becomes more critical before combating the causes. We 
must act now to protect the welfare and future of our 
youth. 

'The total number of selected law enforcement officers 
from every state of the Union, as well as leading foreign 
police agencies, who have graduated from the National 
Police Academy, now total 1,047 men. These officials all 
know the methods taught here. They are all disciples of 
modern crime detection. These officers can and will he of 
great assistance in the fight for a decent social order. 

"Real peace and order cannot be obtained by vast 
armies of policemen merely trying to use force and arms to 
crush crime by old-fashioned methods. Today more than 
ever before, we need quality, not just quantity, in our 



Phone sutler 6 133 Baldwin McGaw, Managing-Owner 

HOTEL BALDWIN 

In the Heart of the Shopping, Theatre and Business District 

A Comfortable and Friendly Hotel 

Moderate Rates 

Every Room is an Outside Room with a Private Bath 

32 1 GRANT AVENUE, near Sutter SAN FRANCISCO 

sutler 022 7 

ARTHUR A. HYMAN 

ATTORNEY-At-LAW 

300 MONTGOMERY STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone GArfield 946 7 Frank Monahan - Harry Castle 

PEARL OYSTER HOUSE 

RESTAURANT and COCKTAIL LOUNGE 
Dinners - Broiled Steaks - Prime Rib Roasts 



442 PINE STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Telephone GArfield 6768 

A. B. LANNING 



Manager 
DITTO. Inc. 



MONADNOCK BUILDING 



SAN FRANCISCO 



EMERALD H. CHARONATT 

EMERALD'S DENTAL LABORATORY 

5 16 SUTTER STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone UNderhill 4490 Maurice Fisher 

You Will Like Our Improved Method of 

Scientific Cleaning 

CIVIC CENTER 

cleaning and tailoring 

dry cleaners cleaning and pressing 

6 1 McAllister street san francisco 

EXbrook 1005-1006 M. L. Shenk, President 

BUSINESS EQUIPMENT COMPANY 

Distributors for: 
Woodstock Typewriters, R. C. Allen Business Machines 

5 1 7 MARKET STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

suiter 2894 

P. H. SPIESS 

WILLITS AND COMPANY. Inc. 

I DRUMM STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

TRUDE MANUFACTURING CO. 

130 SUTTER STREET SAN FRANCISCO] 

ORTON MACHINE CO. 

MANUFACTURERS OF WOODWORKING 
MACHINERY 

390 FREMONT STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

LE'WIS R. STEINBERG 

BUILDERS' EXCHANGE 
SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone EXbrook 95 02 



B. "Sadie" Sada 



P, Dantoni 



LOOP BOWLING ALLEYS 



Cocktail Lounge - Dining Room - Hotel Accommodations 

Just Off International Settlement - Ladies Welcome 
238 COLUMBUS AVE, - 103 1 KEARNY ST. - SAN FRANCISCO 



HEPPERLE, McENERNEY & JACOBS 

2002 HOBART BUILDING SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone UNderhill 1267 

ROBERT W. JAMISON 

Railroad Equipment and Supplies 
1345 MISSION STREET SAN FRANCISCO I 

REYNOLDS METALS CO. 

345 NINTH STREET SAN FRANCISCO | 



June, 194S 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 2? 



law-enforcing agencies. Small, but efficient groups, oper- 
ating carefully and intelligently, can accomplish far more 
than a large untrained force. You are being sent forth to 
assist your community by applying the latest scientific 
methods placed at your disposal by this specialized train- 
ing. You will guide others to appreciate the great benefits 
of modern techniques and efficient nation-wide cooperation 
in combating crime. 

"Today millions of our young men are fighting through- 
out the world for the preservation of democratic decency. 
It would be tragic indeed if they came back to find that 
the home-front had fallen down on the job. Our veterans 
have the right to expect us to safeguard their homes and 
their relatives, despite all wartime difficulties. 

"In this sacred trust, the home guard will not fail. 

MA 115 1 

BAL-MAC REFRIGERATION COMPANY 



C. B. McALPIN 



416 SIXTH STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Residence: 147 PARKER AVENUE - SKyline 6246 R. Massagli 

G. MASSAGLI & CO. 

Contractors - Concrete Construction - Cement Work of All Kinds 
128 PARKER AVENUE Phone SKyline 6246 SAN FRANCISCO 
Phone CRaystone 9966 



Prizes 3 Times Weekly 



TIL TWO 

**A Congenial Rendezvous" 
Boost Our Til-Two Bowlers 
502 ELLIS STREET, near Leavenworth 



SAN FRANCISCO 



EVergreen 9863 LLOYD CISNEY 

TONY'S TAVERN 



5512 GEARY BLVD.. bet. 19th and 20th 



SAN FRANCISCO 



BAyview55 17 P.A.GARCIA 

INDEPENDENT MEXICO CITY CAFE 

We Specialize in Mexican Dishes 

(GENUINE MEXICAN COOKING) 

OPEN: 11:30 A. M. to 8 P. M. — CLOSED MONDAYS 

1792 HAIGHT STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Telephone CRaystone 9643 NOEL WAGGONER 

NOEL WAGGONER 

Tops - Trimmings - Cushions - Seat Covers 



"Quality Pays" 



714 VAN NESS AVENUE 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone HEmlock 1089 

GEORGE G. GOLDAMMER 



Manufacturer CERAMICS 



271 So. VAN NESS AVENUE 



SAN FRANCISCO 



POTRERO CAFE 



2001 16th STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Mission 903 3 



General Petroleum Products 



MEL 8C GIL'S SERVICE 

Expert Lubrication - Washing and Polishing 

Ignition Service 

MISSION and VALENCIA SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone ORdway 4884 M. J. Pope, Mgr. 

HOTEL SHAWMUT 

$1.50 with Bath - Attractive Rates to Permanent Guests 

5 16 O'FARRELL STREET. Corner JONES SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone SEabright 2471 Fred Jenny & Associates 

MORTICIANS SUPPLY SALES AGENCY 

MANUFACTURERS - JOBBERS - MANUFACTURERS' AGENTS 

Quality Funeral Supplies 

1320 22nd AVENUE SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone SKyline 262 1 



BAY VIEW PHARMACY 

PRESCRIPTION SPECIALISTS 



6157 GEARY BOULEVARD 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phones UNderhill 3136 or 3137 

Compliments of 

STAR PHARMACY 



498 CASTRO STREET at 18th 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Dine and Dance to the Music of DUKEON WONG SWING BAND 

CHINESE SKY ROOM 

Newest and Finest Restaurant and Cocktail Lounge 

On 6th Floor, overlooking San Francisco's famed Chinatown 
GRANT AVENUE and PINE STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Complinnents of 

BELFAST BEVERAGES 

SAN FRANCISCO 



MONTAGUE COMPANY 



360 NINTH STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



EXbrook 72 79 



CHARLES F. SCHROTH 

ATTORNEY-At-LAW 



465 CALIFORNIA STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone HEmlock 68 18 

WAXMAN'S BAKERIES 



3355 17th STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone MArket 8338 



Capitol Cleaning & Dyeing Plant 

Your Garments, Etc., Are Done By Experts Only 



2 BRADY STREET 

Off Market bet. 12th and Valencia 



We Call and Deliver 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone KEarny 15 13 



FIXTURES 



Sectional Partitions 



THE FINK 8C SCHINDLER CO. 

Manufacturing Contractors - Complete Installations 
Store - Bank - Bar - Restaurant - Office 



552 BRANNAN STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone MArket 04 19 

San Francisco Screw Products Co. 

Manufacturers of SCREW MACHINE PRODUCTS 

755 BRANNAN STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



S. F. Phone EXbrook 4548 



S. J. Phone Columbia 3911 



DR. A. O. WEHINGER 

CHIROPRACTOR AND RADIONIST 

26 O'FARRELL STREET 1 990 THE ALAMEDA 

SAN FRANCISCO SAN JOSE 

COMPLIMENTS 

Mangrum, Holbrook & Elkus 



SAN FRANCISCO 



OAKLAND 



LOS ANGELES 



CRaystone 9800 Mrs. G. Hilzinger 

HOTEL JEFFERSON APARTMENTS 

Two and Three Rooms — Steam Heat, Hot Water, 
Elevator, Refrigeration 

848 COUGH STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

FRANK R. GEIS 

METALLURGICAL LABORATORIES 



604 MISSION STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Mis 



S5I5 



V. Venturi. Instructor 



VENTURI BROS. 



Expert Repairing on American and Swiss 

Watches and Clocks 

ALL WORK GUARANTEED 

242 1 MISSION STREET, near 20th Street SAN FRANCISCO 



Page 26 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



June, 1945 



"At home here we still have a tremendous task ahead 
of us. The dislocation of families by war work in distant 
plants, the growing threat of juvenile delinquency, and the 
psychological reactions of individuals exposed to the 
emotional hardships of war, all present problems of the 
first magnitude. If we intend to insure the proper social 
climate which will permit orderly progress in keeping with 
our ideals, all of us must face these new problems frankly 
and act effectively. 

"The modern law-enforcement official needs far more 
than a night stick and a gun to maintain peace and order. 
The efficient officer must know the nature and extent of 
local social problems. He must use scientific tests, as well as 
psychology. As a progressive leader he should effectively 
mobilize all available agencies in his locality, and through- 
out the country, for the prevention, as well as the detec- 
tion of crime. This is a large order, but the times call for 
men of large stature. 

"As bigger social problems are presented, America needs 
better trained men to solve them. You are indeed fortunate 
in having the opportunity of association with the best and 
receiving the finest training available in your specialized 
profession. By your conduct and character you can make 
your profession one of the most progressive and useful in 
our national life. 

"In a few months the National Police Academy will 
celebrate its tenth anniversary. During this decade tremen- 
dous things have been accomplished by its graduates. If 
we had time it could be shown how much money society 
was saved by the special training of these graduates. We 
could list also the arrests made, convictions obtained and 
pardons recommended by these officers. 

"No set of statistics, however, can adequately convey 
the heartache averted, nor the deep-felt gratitude for 
crimes prevented, for lives saved, for missing people recov- 
ered, and for the countless worthy services rendered. Even 
the most comprehensive reporting system cannot reveal 
these things. For all such essential services, society is indeed 
grateful to the law enforcement officers, especially to the 
graduates of this splendid Academy. 

"Our fighting men on all fronts are today going through 
a most strenuous ordeal. They are bravely offering their 
lives so that we may live our democratic way. The heroes 
on the battele-front surely deserve all praise and credit for 
their noble fight. 

"The general public, unfortunately, does not fully 
appreciate the fact that right here at home other heroes 
are waging a relentless war against another deadly foe — 
the modern criminal. This public enemy is resourceful, 
crafty and efficient. His attacks are frequently powerful 
and against the weak. Your bitter conflict against crime 




Phone CLencourt 407 1 



H. S. HENION 

ATTORNEY .AT LAW 



1705 BROADWAY 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone Richmond 1 4 

DR. EDMOND M. DIEFENBACH 

Surgical Chiropodist - Foot Specialist 

AMERICAN TRUST BUILDING RICHMOND. CALIF. 

Phone OLympic 2940 — Connecting All Departments 

STAR GROCERY 

Highest Quality Groceries, Meats, Fruits, Vegetables, 
Wines and Liquors 

3068 CLAREMONT AVENUE 



BERKELEY, CALIF. 



Compliments of 

DR. M. L. DIEVENDORF 



302 7 COLLEGE AVENUE 



BERKELEY. CALIF. 



Phones: HIghgate 4962; Res. CLencourt 1573 



Adolph A. Kay 



STANDARD FURNITURE CO. 

Complete Home Furnishings - Liberal Credit 

54 1 nth STREET at CLAY OAKLAND. CALIF. 

MILLER WOOD PRODUCTS CO. 

Manufacturers of Storage Battery Separators 
Redwood and Douglas Fir Lumber 



1335 SIXTH STREET 



BERKELEY, CALIF. 



Phone OLympic 116 1 



E. M. Alexander, Prop. 



1 



HAWS PLATING WORKS 

PLATING - OXIDIZING - ELETRO TIN 



1808 HARMON STREET 



BERKELEY, CALIF. 



Phone Richmond 2242W Photographs That Live 

VOGUE STUDIO 

Portraits of Distinction - Copying - Enlarging - Coloring 



A Frame for Every Picture 



434 MACDONALD AVENUE 



RICHMOND, CALIF. 



Phone Richmond 828 

RICHMOND FUNERAL PARLORS 



CLAIRE SCHMIDT 
332 ELEVENTH STREET 



RICHMOND, CALIF. 



Phone Richmond 243 



GOODYEAR - Wholesale - Retail 



EL CERRITO TIRE CO. 

We're Not Satisfied Until You Are - New Tires and Recapping 

15 1 I SAN PABLO AVENUE EL CERRITO. CALIF. 

Phone Richmond 167 Virg. Simoni 

BARRETT AVENUE GARAGE 



AUTO REPAIRING 
We Fix 'Em - and Fix 'M Right! 



SEVENTH and BARRETT 



RICHMOND. CALIF. 



Phone Richmond 643 -J 

G. W. SCHWARTZ 

Auto Accessories - Ford Parts - Fishing Tackle - Ammunition 
Storage Batteries - Electrical Supplies 



517 MACDONALD AVENUE 



RICHMOND. CALIF. 



He that hath the Son hath life; and he that hath not the Son of God 
hath not life. ^1 John 5: 12. 

GUS' GARAGE 

826 CHANSLOR AVENUE RICHMOND, CALIF. 

Phone Richmond 4935 Gene Bailey 

TEN-RIP SERVICE 

TENTH and RIPLEY STREETS RICHMOND. CALIF. 



Phone Richmond 382 



Louis F. Wagner, Prop. 



ELECTRIC MODERN PASTRY SHOP 



32 1 TWENTY-THIRD STREET 



RICHMOND. CALIF. 



June, J945 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 27 



is endless. 

"To check the constant ravages of crime requires charac- 
ter of the highest order. As well expressed in the motto of 
the National Police Academy, to win your war you need 
'Knowledge, Courage, Integrity.' The omission of any one 
part of this trinity of virtues makes the other two prac- 
tically useless. Like the three-legged stool, it simply cannot 
stand on two. 

"The world would be a much better place if more 
people possessed these great virtues — knowledge, courage 
and integrity. I am confident that, after your practical ex- 
perience and intensive training, you will continue to be the 
strong champions of law and order. With your essential 
character and tested ability, you will render a lasting serv- 
ice to your community and to your country." 

Ph. LAndscape 5-3836 • Res. Ph. L.Andscape 5-3260 Carl W . Douglas 

FAIRMONT MONUMENT WORKS 

"Lasting Memories for Those Who Care'* 

7524 FAIRMONT AVENUE 

Near Sunset View Cemetery EL CERRITO. CALIF. 



Phone Richmond 2 7 



"^'our Downtown BUICK Dealer 



CONTRA COSTA MOTORS 

Complete Automotive Service - Used Cars Bought and Sold 

222 TENTH STREET RICHMOND, CALIF. 

Phone Richmond 722 



Phone LAndscape 5-5786 

HUTCHINSON CO. 

CRUSHED ROCK - SAND - GRAVEL 
RaU or Water 

7360 SCHMIDT LANE EL CERRITO, CALIF. 

See Our Newly Remodeled and Redecorated Store 



322 lOlh STREET 



BREUNER'S 

Established 1856 



RICHMOND, CALIF. 



Phone Richmond 2 7 75 

RICHMOND BRAKE SHOP 



JOS. D M.4LON1 
MC8 MACDONALD AVENUE 



RICHMOND, CALIF. 



Wholesale 



BOWMAN & WOOD 

AUTOMOTIVE 



Retail 



Starter - Generator - Carburetor - Ignition and Motor Tune-up 

U06 MACDONALD RICHMOND, CALIF. Phone 4948 



Phone BErkeley 034 7 



F. L. Holbrook 



HOLBROOK'S 



Sheet Metal Contractors - Air Conditioning - Heating 

2 180 DWIGHT WAY BERKELEY. CALIF. 



Phone Richmond 142 1 



S. C. Townsley, Prop. 



TRAVELERS HOTEL 

Steam Heat - Bath and Showers 

Transient - Monthly Rates 

52 1 MACDONALD AVENUE RICHMOND, CALIF. 



POWDER PUFF BEAUTY SHOP 



339 TENTH STREET 



RICHMOND, CALIF. 



DILL'S EL CERRITO PHARMACY 



420 SAN P.ABLO AVENUE 



EL CERRITO. CALIF. 



Phone Richmond 2 5 68 

Richmond Household Appliance Co. 

REPAIR WASHERS, WRINGERS, VACUUMS, 
IRONS, RADIOS 

224 MACDON.ALD AVENUE RICHMOND. CALIF. 



A. R. WEISGERBER 

DE SOTO and PLYMOUTH 
1225 -1231 MACDONALD AVENUE RICHMOND, CALIF. 

Phone Richmond 4 I i 

CENTRAL GARAGE 

REPAIRING — STORAGE 

241 NINTH STREET RICHMOND, CALIF. 



THE TREASURE CHEST 

927 MACDONALD AVENUE RICHMOND, CALIF. 

Phone LAndscape 5-7991 

EL CERRITO STEEL PRODUCTS CO. 

STEEL PLATE FABRICATORS 
1424 KEARNEY STREET EL CERRITO, CALIF. 

Phone Richmond 5 06 

DAVID M. ROSE 



2420 MACDONALD AVENUE 



RICHMOND, CALIF. 



Phones: Office Richmond 105; Res. AShberry 1370 

ROSS T. COREY 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 
803 MACDONALD AVENUE 



Columbia Wood 8C Metal Preservative Co. 



1465 FOURTH STREET 



BERKELEY, CALIF. 



Ph. GLencourt 0740 We Deliver Anywhere Leo Baum, Pharmacist 

LEO'S NORMAL PHARMACY 

Drugs, Sundries, Kodaks, Surgical Supplies 

Prescriptions a Specialty 

I 10! BROADW.AY OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Phone Office BErkeley 4090 Residence THornwall 2885 

CLEARFLOW 

DEPENDABLE VALVES 

George A. Plummer, Manager 

13 30 SECOND STREET BERKELEY, CALIF. 



Phone TEmplebar 5523 

L. 



Beauty Parlor Equipment 

NEWMAN 

Tool, Die and Machine Work - Designing and Metal Stamping 
Contract Manufacturing 

1001 24lh STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 



AMES & SEEFLOTH MFG. CO. 

PLANING MILL SERVICE 



1340 CHANNING WAY 



BERKELEY, CALIF. 



Phone TEmplebar 7420 



Bonded Locksmiths 



THE SYSTEM KEY WORKS 

General Repairing of All Kinds • Auto Locks and Handles 

1844 SAN PABLO AVENUE OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Phone BErkeley 6010 

HEZLETT'S DRESS SHOP 

Ready-to-Wear Dresses - Suits and Millinery 
22 77 SHATTUCK .AVE., Opp. United .Artists Theater BERKELEY 
Phone Richmond 510 F. Perata - D. Piazza 

PARK FLORIST 

CUT FLOWERS — - PLANTS — FLORAL DESIGNS 



1508-10 MACDONALD AVENUE 



RICHMOND, CALIF. 



RICHMOND. CALIF. 



Phone SKyline 4685 

PAUL'S 

Cocktails and Amer Picon Our Specialty 
4100 GEARY BOULEVARD. Cor. 5th Ave. SAN FRANCISCO 



Page 28 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



June, 1945 



LIEUTENANT JOHN CASEY DIES 

Lieutenant John J. Casey, who for the past five years 
has been in charge of the City Prison of the San Francisco 
Pohce Department, died suddenly May 28. He was born 
in San Francisco on November 20, 1884. 

On July 18, 1907, when but 22 years of age, he joined 
the Police Department of his native city. 

He was assigned to various police districts but in 1917 
he was detailed to the Traffic Bureau, then a modest 
branch of the Department. He mounted one of the horses 
used for patroling downtown San Francisco, and made an 
imposing figure as he rode over the bustling streets of the 
city. He remained with Traffic until May 22, 1940, 
acting as Captain of Traffic following the death of Capt. 
Charles GofF. On that date he was sent to the City 
Prison. For the past two years his health has been un- 
favorable, and when he failed to report for duty on May 
29 an officer was sent to his home and when the land- 
lady of the apartment in which he resided unlocked the 
door to his living quarters he was found dead in bed. 

Lieutenant Casey studied during his off hours as an 
officer and passed successfully in all ranks of the Depart- 
ment to that which he held when he died. He was made 
a Corporal March 3, 1911, a Sergeant June 28, 191'), 
and a Lieutenant October 23, 1924. 

He is survived by a daughter, Mrs. Walter H. Kal- 
velage. 

The funeral was held June 2, from English fe? Carews 
chapel, a Requiem High Mass was held in old St. Mary's 
church. 



Phone Richmond 670; Res. Piedmont 4358-J 



General Jobbing 



RICHMOND SHEET METAL 'WORKS 

H. A. Swearingen - Dave Kessler 
Heating and Ventilating - Cornices and Skylights 



549 PORTOLA 



RICHMOND, CALIF. 



Phone Richmond 1804 



Gasoline and Oils 



T'WO BROTHERS AUTO PARTS 

BUTCH and VAL'S 
Beer and Wine - at Two Brothers' Station 



47th and PULLMAN AVENUE 



RICHMOND. CALIF. 



Phone BErkeley 1534 

MUELLER'S PHARMACY 

Prescriptions - Merck's Chemicals - Sickroom Supplies - Household 
Necessities - Marcelle- Hypo-AUergenic Cosmetics- Yardley Toiletries 

ACHESON BLDC, 2 129 UNIVERSITY AVE. BERKELEY. CALIF. 
Phone BErkeley 63 70 Tim Hershal 

THE BERKELEY INN 

All Outside Rooms 
HASTE at TELEGRAPH BERKELEY. CALIF. 



Phones: Office THornwall 3822 



Residence THornwall 2267 



GEORGE H. SISSON 

Real Estate - Licensed Broker - Notary Public - General Insurance 
2907 TELEGRAPH AVENUE BERKELEY. CALIF. 

Phone 3619 

BLACK & WHITE LIQUOR STORE 

Liquors, Wines and Beer 



1025 MACDONALD AVENUE 



RICHMOND. CALIF. 



CONN DRUG CO. 



lOth and MACDONALD 
Ph. Richmond 421 



RICHMOND. CALIF. 



23rd and MACDONALD 
Ph. Richmond 4220 



General Engineering 



AND 



Dry Dock Company 
of San Francisco 



June, 1945 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 29 



RULES OF THE ROAD 

There are six things to do if you should have an auto- 
mobile accident, admonishes the Legal Department of the 
National Automobile Club. Failure to do any of these six 
things may result in illegal action on your part, and fur- 
ther injury to the other parties involved ; 

1. Stop at once and give all the help you can to anyone 
who is hurt. 

2. If any person is hurt or killed, call the local police, 
sheriff or California Highway Patrolman, at once. 

3. Give anyone else in the same accident your address and 
name, and show him your driver's license and registra- 
tion certificate. 

4. Make a full report of the accident in writing, to the 
Department of Motor Vehicles or to an office of the 
California Highway Patrol, within 24 hours, in case of 
injury or death of anyone involved. 

5. If you hit a parked car, or damage property, and the 
owner is not there, make an effort to find him. 

6. If you can not find the owner, leave a note in the 
driver's compartment or under the windshield wiper, in 
which you have stated your name and address and the 
name and address of the owner of the car you are driv- 
ing. Notify the police, sheriff or California Highway 
Patrol within 24 hours. 

Phone 2 701 

MILLBRAE CREAMERY 

We Also Serve Meals at Reasonable Prices 
MILLBRAE CALIFORNIA 

Phone San Bruno I 742 

REMEMBER ME 

ITALIAN DINNERS 

700 EL CAMINO REAL MILLBRAE, CALIF. 

Phone 2006 

W. H. GIBBONS 

INSURANCE AGENCY 
10 LA CRUZ AVENUE MILLBRAE, CALIF. 



Phone South City 14 77 



HOTEL CAFE 

"WHERE GOOD FELLOWS MEET" 



215 LUX AVENUE 



SO. SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Phone S. S. F. 193 5 



James Panos, Prop. 



South City Laundry SC Linen Supply Company 

100 Per Cent Union Labor - Mending and Darning Free 

I 12 GRAND AVENUE SO. SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Phone 3 076 



LAMUTH'S MARKET 

MEATS - GROCERIES - VEGETABLES 
Stationery - Sundries - Wines - Beer 



8031^ LINDEN AVENUE 



SO. SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Phone San Bruno 17 74 



Minnie and Vic 



BELLEVUE INN 

DINNERS - COCKTAILS 



483 EL CAMINO REAL 



SAN BRUNO, CALIF. 



Phone South San Francisco 393 

EL CAMINO MARKET 

STAPLE and FANCY GROCERIES - IMPORTED GOODS 
FRESH and CHOICE MEATS 

213 EL CAMINO REAL and ORANGE AVE. SO. SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone Redwood City 24 



PENINSULA BAKERY 

WE CARRY A FINE LINE OF BAKERY QOODS 



822 MAIN STREET 



REDWOOD CITY, CALIF. 



J. B. PILKINGTON NURSERY 



MILLBRAE 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone Redwood 5 78 

FABBRO'S CAFE 

Cocktail Lounge - Dinners - Package Liquors 

2915 EL CAMINO REAL 



I Mile South of 5 Points 



Phone 4-3601 



H. Pamplin 



MOTEL AVALON 

so MODERN COTTAGES 



220 NO. BAYSHORE BOULEVARD 



SAN MATEO, CALIF. 



Phone 517 Wm. T. Donahue; Res. Ph. LAndscape 5-2233 

RAINBOW PAINT STORE 

THE HOUSE OF QUALITY HOUSE PAINTS 
Featuring Premier Paints - The Practical Painters Line 



3 16 ELEVENTH STREET 



RICHMOND, CALIF. 



JOE POOL PARLOR 



697 SAN MATEO AVENUE 



SAN BRUNO, CALIF. 



LIBERTY HOTEL 



421 CYPRESS AVENUE 



SO. SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



NORMAN HOTEL 



405 CYPRESS AVENUE 



SO. SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



SAN BRUNO CUT RATES 

TOBACCO - WINE - LIQUORS 

542 SAN MATEO AVENUE SAN BRUNO, CALIF. 



Phone 1399 



CARLO'S WINE 8C LIQUOR STORE 

Beverages - Liquors - Wins - Whiskey - Rum - Brandy 
PRICES RIGHT 



445 SAN MATEO AVENUE 



SAN BRUNO, CALIF. 



GOLDEN EAGLE HOTEL 

701 BAYSHORE HIGHWAY SO. SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

THE CLAM POT 

LOMITA PARK CALIFORNIA 



LOMITA PARK DRUG 

BOB LUNDIE, Prop. 



LOMITA PARK POST OFFICE 



CALIFORNIA 



MILLBRAE MOTOR COURT 

EL CAMINO REAL MILLBRAE, CALIF. 

BANK CLUB 

201 W. RICHMOND AVENUE POINT RICHMOND, CALIF. 



Page iO 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



June, 194S 



CHIEF BELLONI 

( Continued from page 12) 

have occurred, a. record the men responsible can well be 
proud ot. 

The policing of the San Francisco Airport comes under 
the jurisdiction of the South San Francisco Police De- 
partment, though it is out of the city limits. 

Chief Belloni's personnel is made up of the following: 

Assistant Chief Vincent Bianchini, Sergeant August 
Terrango, (in charge of traffic), Officers Joseph Bildhauer. 
Henry McGraw, Wm. Whipple, Nelo La-:an, Michael 
Lamuth, Frank Bertucelli, Mario Blandini, Arthur Ro- 
dondi and Silvio Stagnaro. 

Radio Telephone operators: R. N. Murphy and Dan 
Lombardi. 

Matron: Mrs. Bianchini. 

The Department has three Buick two-way radio- 
equipped patrol cars and one motorcycle likewise equipped. 

Officer McGraw is the oldest in point of service on the 
rolls, having joined in 1917, and is still going strong. As- 
sistant Chief Bianchini is second, becoming a police officer 
in 1924. Sergeant Terrango has been a member for 13 
years. 

Mayor George W. Holston heads the city council, made 
up of Victor Boido, M. Minucciani, Ivan M. Hays and 
Charles Elder. The City Judge is S. K. Ribbins and the 
City Attorney is J. W. Colebero. These city officials have 
contributed their share to giving South San Francisco 
such excellent law enforcement, and they have backed up 
Chief Belloni and his men in every way possible to make 
their busy little city a safe place in which to live. 

Chief Belloni is a great advocate of mutual aid and 
the adoption of every modern idea that will make for 
peace. He is an active member of the State Peace Officers' 
Association, the Bay Counties Peace Officers' Association 
and the Peninsula Police OlTicers' Association. He seldom 
misses a meeting of any of these organizations. He can 
look back on his more than 21 years as Chief of his 
native town with great pride, for he has seen it grow up 
from a small whistle stop to one of the most important 
little cities in this country', and he has kept his town law- 
abiding. 

MENLO BAR B-Q 

1850 EL C.AMINO REAL MENLO PARK. CALIF. 

COLUMBUS CAFE 



458 COLUMBUS AVENUE 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone PRospect 9860 



Al La Rocca - Leo Le Rocc 



THIS IS IT- 
LA ROCCA'S CORNER 



95 7 COLUMBUS AVENUE 



Phone Redwood 607 



REDWOOD INN 

GUS and JIMMY 



744 EL CAMINO REAL, at Broadway 



REDWOOD CITY. CALIF. 



Phone 5-1245 



J. Orecchia 



S & M 'WINE & LIQUOR STORE 

Full Line of California Wines 

2328 SO. EL CAMINO REAL, at 24th Ave. SAN MATEO, CALIF. 

Phone 2996 

FRANK A. POIRIER 

REAL ESTATE- INSURANCE-BUILDER 



443 SAN MATEO AVENUE 



SAN BRUNO. CALIF. 



Phone Redwood 1634-163 5 

HOLMQUIST HARDWARE 

Hardware - Pipe - Valves - Fittings - Steel Products 
Machine Work - Fuller Paints 

MAIN at STAMBAUCH REDWOOD CITY. CALIF. 

Phone 3-2246 

FOLEY & BOETTCHER LUMBER CO. 

LUMBER AND BUILDING MATERIALS 



BAYSHORE HIGHWAY at ClPRESS 



SAN MATEO, CALIF. 



Phone R C. 3 3 



Jess Larrecou. Prop. 



JESS' PLACE 



85 7 MAIN STREET 



REDWOOD CITY. CALIF. 



Phone 559-W 



JACK TRAHAN 



WALDORF BUFFET 



Never A Dull Moment 



213 SECOND AVENUE 



SAN MATEO. CALIF. 



Ph. Redwood 4 74 Closed Mondays and Tuesdays - Open Holidays 

CAFE DE PARIS 

Swanky Cocktail Lounge - Private Room For Parties, Banquets 

GRACE and PIERRE - Since 1930 

ONE MILE SOUTH 



LEFT OF REDWOOD CITY. CALIF. 



Phone 3017 



C. GILBERT 

UPHOLSTERING 
CUSTOM-MADE FURNITURE TO ORDER 



2404 EL CAMINO REAL 



REDWOOD CITY. CALIF. 



Phone San Carlos 2093 

STORK CLUB 

GEORGE MAILHOIT 
1240 EL CAMINO RE.AL SAN CARLOS, CALIF. 



Phone RAndoIph 9592 



Joe Howarth 



DALY CITY AUTO WRECKERS 

USED PARTS FOR ALL CARS 
Cars Bought, Sold and Exchanged - Used Tubes and Batteries 



7201 MISSION STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone San Mateo 3-582 1 



Estimate Department 3-3495 



SAN MATEO PLANING MILL CO. 

Lumber, Wall Boards, Shingles, Lath, Millwork 

Mil) Blocks. $4.23 per load. 50c per sack - Door, Sashes. Etc. 



Corner FIFTH and SO. CLAREMONT STS. 



SAN MATEO. CALIF. 



Florence L. Alford. Prop 



Open Every Day 



EL CAMINO GROCERY 

GROCERIES - WINE - BEER - LIQUORS 

1034 EL CAMINO REAL BELMONT, CALIF. 

PALO ALTO: 255 Hamilton Ave., Medical Bldg. . Ph. Palo Alto 73 02 
SAN MATEO: 79 Third Avenue .... Phone San Mateo 779 
REDWOOD CITY: 3664 Broadway at Highway . Ph. Redwood 13! 

SAN CARLOS CLEANERS, INC. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



BURLINGAME: 3 12 Primrose Road . 
SAN CARLOS: 951-957 Laurel Street 
BURLING.AME: 1209 Broadway . . 



Phone Burlingame 490 
Phone San Carlos 280 
Phone Burlingame 872 



]une, 194S 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 31 



Phone San Bruno 144 

MIGGE'S MARKET 

Groceries - Meats - Vegetables - Beers and Wines 

EL CAMINO REAL at SANTA LUCIA LOMITA PARK. CALIF. 



HOWARD JORDAN 

500 EL CAMINO REAL LOMITA PARK, CALIF. 



Phone Redwood 84 



.An Independent Home-owned Store 



OLD PALACE MARKET 

Groceries - Quality Meats - Vegetables - Free Delivery 

THOS. TUITE and SONS, Props. 



825 MAIN STREET 



REDWOOD CITY, CALIF. 



Phone San Mateo 3-4543 

PLANERTO-KESTA 

DEALER - GENERAL REPAIRS 

1320 EL CAMINO REAL 



Marcel Periat 



SAN MATEO, CALIF. 



Phone Millbrae 222 1 



H. Karrlou, Prop. Phone San Mateo 2120 Decalcomania Transfers and Polish For Sale 



HARRY KARRLOU 



RESTAURANT 
Good Food to Your Taste 



205 EL CAMINO REAL 



MILLBRAE, CALIF. 



JOSEPH REGNER 

CABINET AND REFINISHING SHOP 
Repairing, Lacquering, Furniture Made to Order, Antiques Restored 

320 SIXTH AVENUE SAN MATEO. CALIF. 



Phone S. M. 3-9774 



Mr. and Mrs. Krafft Phone 5-9928 



FOR FUN WITH FRANKIE & JOHNNY 



SAN MATEO MOTOR INN 

Strictly Modem - Member United Motor Courts 

BAYSHORE HIGHWAY at 9lh AVENUE SAN MATEO, CALIF. 



BAY MEADOWS 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE and DINING ROOM 



SO. EL CAMINO at 21st AVENUE 



SAN MATEO, CALIF. 



Phone S. M. 4-02 13 



AI Caddini, Prop. Phone 495 



PIONEER AUTO PARTS 

USED CARS 
24 BAYSHORE BOULEVARD SAN MATEO. CALIF. 



Phone Redwood 2406 



Ed Montoro 



WILLOW MARKET 

GROCERIES - WINES - VEGETABLES 



37 WILLOW STREET 



REDWOOD CITY, CALIF. 



DO NUT KETTLE 

GOOD DOUGNUTS AND COFFEE 

903 EL CAMINO REAL MENLO PARK, CALIF. 



Charlie Tognoli, Prop. 



CHARLIE 'S 



Italian Dinners - Fine Wines - Mixed Drinks 

1160 OLD COUNTY ROAD BELMONT. CALIF. 

CENTRAL CAFE 

Good Liquors and Good Service 



1628 EL CAMINO REAL 



REDWOOD CITY, CALIF. 



Phone DOuglas 0639 

W. ENGEL MANUFACTURING CO. 

LEATHER and CANVAS SPECIALTIES 

58 SECOND STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



S. H. FRANK & CO. 



OCCIDENTAL LIFE INSURANCE CO. 



REDWOOD CITY 



CALIFORNIA 



300 MONTGOMERY STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



THE CHICKEN SHACK 

REGULAR DINNERS - HOME-MADE PIES 



2214 EL CAMINO REAL 



SAN MATEO, CALIF. 



Phone R. C. 223 1 



F. A. Harrington - H. H. Ralstin 



DUMBARTON OAKS MARKET 



LIQUORS and GROCERIES 



REDWOOD CITY 



CALIFORNIA 



SANDBAR TAVERN 



LASALLE HOTEL 



225 HYDE STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone Millbrae 3 161 Nello Tommei, Prop. 

MILLBRAE TAVERN 

BEER - WINES - LIQUORS - SANDWICHES 

230 EL CAMINO REAL MILLBRAE. CALIF. 

V. STAMPOLI TAVERN 

BEER - WINE 



263 SIXTH STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



3033 EL CAMINO REAL 



ATHERTON, CALIF. Phone So. San Francisco 1446 



Phone San Mateo 4-3694 

PIEDMONT HOTEL 

\'. BRUZZONE. Proprietor 
500 SECOND AVENUE SAN MATEO. CALIF. 

Telephone Red. 24 3 

HERB'S SMOKE SHOP 



FAY, Prop. 



PAL'S CLUB 

DANCING - ENTERTAINMENT 
A Hearty Welcome to All 



75 1 BAYSHORE BOULEVARD 



SO. SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Phone Millbrae 322 I 



George Dolivo 



HIGHLANDS 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE 



CIGARS & SOFT DRINKS 
817 MAIN STREET 



SNOOKER POOL 
REDWOOD CITY, CALIF. 



333 EL CAMINO RE.AL 



MILLBRAE, CALIF. 



Phone So. San Francisco I 193 



V. Pariani - Carlo Ferrario 



JOCKY CLUB 



36 EL CAMINO REAL 



INDUSTRIAL HOTEL 

BEER - WINE - LIQUORS 
Rooms and Board - Italian Dinners 



SAN MATEO, CALIF. 



505 C^'PRESS AVENUE 



SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Phone Richmond 634 



RICHMOND BEVERAGE COMPANY 

Wholesalers of 
GRACE BROS. - RAINIER - SCHLITZ 



325 22nd STREET 



RICHMOND. CALIF. 



Phone Richmond I 14 

CHASSEUR GROCERY 

GROCERIES, FRUITS, VEGETABLES 
FRESH POULTRY 

128 STANDARD AVENUE POINT RICHMOND, CALIF. 



Page 32 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



June, 1945 



Vacation at Home in 1945 



Join the Campaign 
Let the Man in Uniform 

This is a request for your cooperation in a campaign 
to urge every civilian to stay OFF inter-city buses and 
trains this summer unless the trip is necessary to winning 
the war against Japan. 

Women, children, workers in factories, offices and else- 
where, housewives — everyone should he informed that 
travel space is urgently needed for the redeployment of 
troops and war materials from Europe to the Pacific and 
for the increasing use of discharged troops returning home, 
casualties and military furloughs. 

Here's what the Agencies of Government say about it: 

ARMY AND NAVY: "The concentration of this 
nation's war resources to one front — the Pacific, together 
with other armed service movements — will require the 
transport of more troops than the West has ever seen. 
These are the reasons: 

"1. Redeployment of hundreds of thousands of troops 
from Europe to the Pacific has now begun and will be 
speeded week by week. 

"2. The end of the war in Germany and the War 
Department reorganization program provides for dis- 
charge within a year of 1,300,000 men, most of them now 
overseas. These men are beginning to return and deserve 
prompt transportation home. 

■'.1. There still will be battle- wear>' men returning 
from the Pacific areas for recuperation leaves and the 
number of emergency leaves of military technicians will 
be increased. Given comparatively brief furloughs be- 
cause they can't be spared from the battle lines for too 
long a period, they deserve every accommodation. Any 
delay avoided in the travel of these men gives them that 
much more time with their families. 

"4. Equal numbers of troops are going to the fighting 
fronts to replace those being furloughed and travel space 
is required to transport them. 

"5. Armed services casualties are being moved into 
this country in growing numbers. More than five times 
as many Pullman cars were used moving casualties in 
January, 1945 as in June, 1944. Meanwhile, thousands 



to Vacation at Home 
Use Your Space to Travel 

of American prisoners in the Japanese-held areas are yet 
to be rescued. These persons will be returned to this 
country through Pacific Coast ports when liberated. 

"The armed services are restricting unnecessary travel 
within their own ranks; they are encouraging wives and 
sweethearts to stay at home and wait for servicemen to 
arrive home. Considerable furlough time is lost when 
families leave home to meet men returning. Orders for 
debarkation are frequently changed and families may be 
waiting at one Pacific Coast port for troops returned at 
another port. 

"The armed services wish civilians here in the West to 



Phone Redwood 1248 



H. A. Huber 



HUBER TOOL WORKS 



TOOLS - DIES - PRECISION INSTRUMENTS 



2666 EL CAMINO REAL 



REDWOOD CITY. CALIF. 



Phones: Redwood 2218-2706 



S. Lawrence 



LAWRENCE TILE CO. 

TILE CONTRACTORS 

2840 MlDDLEFlELD ROAD REDWOOD CITY. CALIF. 



Phone S. B. 1468 



Joe Ludwig - Gal Olsen, Props. 
CAL and Joe*s 



16-MILE HOUSE 

On EL CAMINO REAL 
BETWEEN MILLBRAE and LOMITA PARK 



Phone 5-9980 



MIXED DRINKS 



Formerly LANGDON'S COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT 

MARIO'S 



2010 EL CAMINO REAL 



SAN MATEO, CALIF 



Phone S. M. 3-9922 



Chas. Sullivan 



CLUB SULLIVAN 

Chicken and Steak Dinners 
COCKTAIL LOUNGE - DANCING 



4 16-418 SECOND AVENUE 



SAN MATEO. CALIF. 



Phone 4-1907 



Dick and Ida Welherell 



Open Day and Night Except Sundays 

NITE HAWK CAFE 

Good Meals - Reasonable Prices 
BEER and SOFT DRINKS 



BAYSHORE BOULEVARD 



SAN MATEO. CALIF. 



Phone Redwood 315 



Plant Phone Redwood 1253 



Residence Phone 3275 



REDWOOD CITY LAUNDRY 

COMPLETE FINISH SERVICE 



BLOMQUIST OIL SERVICE 

ROAD OILS - HEATING OILS - EMULSIFIED ASPHALT 



858 JEFFERSON AVENUE 



REDWOOD CITY. CALIF. Plant CHESNUT «c BAYSHORE BLVD. REDWOOD CITY, CALIF. 



June: 1945 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 33 



realize these facts, knowing that continued whole-hearted 
cooperation on the Home Front will materially help the 
one objective for which everyone is praying, fighting and 
working — successful and speedy conclusion of the war 
against Japan." 

"The vacationing public can and should continue to 
do in 194^ what it did in 1944 — vacation at home or at 
nearby resort areas. By not traveling, vacationists will 
give valued assistance in winning the war against Japan." 

WAR MANPOWER COMMISSION: "The entire 
transportation industry is suffering from manpower short- 
ages. More than 300,000 railroad workers and additional 
numbers from bus line operations have entered the armed 
forces. New workers are not only hard to obtain but, for 
the most part are unskilled and must be trained before 
they can handle jobs ordinarily performed by men with 
years of experience. The railroads and bus lines in 
handling redeployment of troops and freight to the Pacific 
on schedule under present manpower handicaps, will need 
continuous public restraint from travel so available skilled 
transportation workers may be efficiently utilised in essen- 
tial passenger and freight services. Full public coopera- 
tion is earnestly requested." 



THE TWO BAERS TAVERN 

CHARLES R. GIVEN, Prop. 



2608 EL CAMINO REAL 



SAN MATEO, CALIF. 



ALEXANDER SANITARIUM INC. 



BELMONT 



CALIFORNIA 



TWIN PINE INC. 



BELMONT 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone R. C. 529 

MEET AND GREET YOUR FRIENDS 



AT THE 



Pho 



2261 



CLOVER CLUB 



RANDALL ORSBURN, JR. 

Specializing^ in 
GARDEN FURNITURE 



1580 EL CAMINO REAL 



SAN CARLOS, CALIF. 



Phones: 3-5603, 3-5604 



REDWOOD CITY 



CALIFORNIA 



R. G. CLIFFORD 

CONTRACTOR 

P. O. BOX 168 



PEDERSEN 8C ARNOLD 

Successors to Wisnom Mill 
QUALITY MILL WORK 



421 FIFTH AVENUE 



SAN MATEO, CALIF. 



Phone Burlingame 3-8832 



Frank J. Regan 



33 EL CAMINO REAL 



SO. SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



LATHAN Engineered POWER BRAKES 

For MOTOR TRUCKS and TRAILERS 
LATHAN COMPANY, INC. 



Bayshore Plumbing 8C Supply Co. 

PLUMBING and HEATING CONTRACTORS 
Repairing A Specialty 



865 BAYSHORE BOULEVARD 



BURLINGAME, CALIF. 



Phone San Mateo 3-9960 



Closed Mondays 



SOUTH LINDEN at TANFORAN SO. SAN FRANCISCO.CALIF. 



Phone P. A. 24255 



John M. Mde. Prop. 



Menlo Body, Fender and Radiator Works 

Complete Wreck Work - Welding - Painting 
Radiators Recored, Repaired, Cleaned 



THE ARAGON 

QUALITY DINNERS 
Daily 4-9 p.m. - Sunday 1-9 p.m. 



I 106 EL CAMINO REAL 



SAN MATEO, CALIF. 



Phone Redwood 81 The Store of Complete Satisfaction - Since 1904 



Rear of Shell Station. COLLEGE and 101 HWY. 



MENLO PARK 



Phone Millbrae 800 



Phone Burlingame 4-1294 



Highland Cleaners and French Laundry 

WE DO GOOD WORK 



HULL BROS. INC. 

DUTCH BOY PAINTS 
GENERAL HARDWARE - HOOVER VACUUM 



MAIN at BROADWAY 



REDWOOD CITY, CALIF. 



355 EL CAMINO REAL 



MILLBRAE, CALIF. 



PAT HART'S DOG HOUSE 

CALIFORNIA 



LOMITA PARK 



Page 34 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



June, 1945 



SHERIFF GLEASON 

I Continued from page 5 ) 
past president of the State Identification Association of 
experts in this line. 

Sheriff Gleason is very active on the peace officers' 
legislative committee which is seeking uniform police 
standards throughout the state, emphasizes the raising of 
professional standards among peace officers and also is 
working for better compensation commensurate with the 
high standards set by the peace officers. 

To the credit of Sheriff Gleason and his thoroughly 
trained staff are the recent solving of several murders 
with arrest and conviction of the slayers. One involved 
the fatal shooting of a Hayward groceryman by one of 
four youthful bandits. 

"And that's where the 2 -way radio did its stuff," com- 
mented Sheriff Gleason. 

The aged grocer, when approached by one of the youths 
who held a rifle in his hand, grabbed the phone and in a 
matter of seconds had the sheriff's office on the phone, 
saying, "I'm being held up", and gave his location. A 
fraction of a second later he shouted in the telephone: "I 
am shot." 

Meantime, the grocer's wife had come downstairs and 
gave the sheriff's deputies a good description of one of the 
youths. 

"It was our radio expert, C. B. McMurphy, who put in 
the first 2 -way radio in the nation (Piedmont) and who 
is in charge of Alameda county's radio system, that han- 
dled the phone call that night," added Gleason. 

In five days wc had all lads in custody and a complete 
confession. 

Then there was the body of an unidentified man found 
on the highway, later identified as a San Francisco taxi 
operator. The body was discovered at 4:30 p. m. and by 
8:00 o'clock the next morning the body was identified. 
The slayer, who was accompanied by two women, was 
located in Oakland and one of the women had a handbag 
in which the gun used m the killing was found. The 
trio had driven off in the car of their victim. 

At present, a two-year-old headless and handless body 
mystery is in the hands of Sheriff Gleason and staff and 
a suspect is in custody. The body was found in Niles 
Canyon. And just recently a severed head was found in a 
suitcase located in Eureka along with a part of a necktie. 
The other part of the necktie was found near the body. 

Sheriff Gleason was born in Johnstown, N. Y., August 
?il, 189 J, and christened Howard Patrick Gleason. The 
nickname of Jack came to him in two ways: He had an 
uncle. Jack Gleason, and there was an oldtime ball player. 
Jack Gleason of St. Louis. When young Gleason played 
with the St. Louis Browns the fans remembered the old- 
timer and instead of Howard, they yelled "Jack" at 
Alameda county's present sheriff. 

After World War I, Sheriff Gleason again turned to 

, baseball and later took one sea trip as a mate aboard a 

cargo vessel carrying Red Cross food and supplies to 

Yokahama, which had been leveled by an earthquake. 

That was in 1923. 



Phone UNderhill 9087 



Arthur Furner 



FURNER'S TEXACO SERVICE 

Complete Lubrication, Washing, Accessories, Tires, Batteries, Etc. 
Service our Specialty 



EIGHTH and MISSION STREETS 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone DElaware 1264 



SERVICE INDUSTRIES, INC. 

OF CALIFORNIA 
FABRICATORS OF MASONITE PRODUCTS 



lOJO CARROLL AVENUE 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone DOuglas 4793 

SOMERTON RESTAURANT 

SADLER'S STEAKS 

440 GEARY STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



UNION SQUARE GARAGE 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



PEOPLES DAIRY PRODUCTS, Inc. 

GRADE A MILK and CREAM 
Cottage Cheese - Butter - Eggs - Chocolate Drinks 



3 745 MISSION STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Mr. and Mrs. U. J. Miller, Proprietors 



CRYSTAL NOOK RESTAURANT 

GOOD MEALS and GOOD FOOD 



85 EIGHTH STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone HEmlock 1818 



RICH PIE SHOP 



1086 FOLSOM STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phon? Mission 9581 



Myrtle Strouse - Chester R. Crowe 



SWING CLUB 

Dining and Dancing at Reasonable Prices 
Catering to the Working People 

(No Cover Charge) - Banquets - Parties 



2624 THIRD STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Sheriff Gleason is married to Anne E. Gleason, and 
has a 12 -year-old daughter, Janet E. The family home 
is at 730 Prospect Avenue. 



June. 1945- POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL Page 35 



Supper Dancing every night of the week, with a Special Feature LVjUlO AJNU l^OMPAIN Y 



Visit the Smartest Room in Town . . . Factory Telephone MArket 52 71 Luko Cuckovich 

THE CIRQUE ROOM 

:ing every night of the week, with a Spe 
on Monday evenings No cover charge at any time Club Room Equipment 

FAIRMONT HOTEL TRU-AGE dice — Poker chips - Clubroom Furniture and Layouts 

Steven W. Royce, Managing Director 
Bernard J. Leonard, Resident Manager 



1271 MISSION STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone HEmlock 9438 R. Cepouceoli - J. Baeza 

HOUSE OF JOY 

BAER& GROSS VIRGINIA TAVERN 

1423 FILLMORE STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

1098 HOWARD STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



Normandie French Restaurant 

Phone EXbrook 9664 Joe Vitale 

Cocktails - Dinners - Dancing 

1326 POWELL ST., near Broadway SAN FRANCISCO 



BUY WAR BONDS 
AND STAMPS 



You Are Always WELCOME at Phone Piedmont 0225 



FOUR-O-CLUB 

Bernice Berger - George Berger 
245 MASON STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



BERTOLA'S RESTAURANT 

"For That Real Italian Dinner" 
4601 TELEGRAPH AVENUE OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phones: TUxedo 2281 - 2282 - 2283 Phone Piedmont 1146 Walter N. Boysen, President i 

TOM KYNE WALTER N. BOYSEN CO. ■ 

Manufacturers Paints - Varnishes - Enamels ' 



No. I OPAL PLACE. Off Taylor Street 

Between Turk and Market Streets SAN FRANCISCO 



42nd and LINDEN STREETS OAKLAND, CALIF. 



POOL ROOM - CARD GAMES Phone GLencourt 6716. 67 17 

M. P. PINNELLA 

San Mateo Billiard Parlor Alameda county Distributor 

SEASIDE PETROLEUM PRODUCTS 

SAN MATEO CALIFORNIA 2 1 5 1 WEST STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone P. A. 222 14 Free Delivery Phone Piedmont 8400 

CABINETS by 

ROLLY SOMER 

PARAMOUNT Built-in Fixture Co. 

EL CAMINO REAL at Selby Lane ATHERTON. CALIF. 5107 BROADWAY OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone 2859 Phone Richmond 505 Fred F. Conwill 

NEW OCEANA INN TRADEWAY STORES 

LIQUORS - WINES - BEER 

THINGS FOR THE HOME 

2635 EL CAMINO REAL REDWOOD CITY, CALIF. 1230 SAN PABLO AVENUE EL CERRITO. CALIFORNIA 



Phone ELkridge 1626 BERNARD FERRARI 

FERRARI BROS. RAFFETTO RANCIO 

WHOLESALE FLOWER GROWERS 

202 UNIVERSITY STREET SAN FRANCISCO BOX 250 COLMA, CALIF. 



Page 36 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



June, 194? 



THE GENESIS OF FINGERPRINTS 

I Continued from page 9 ) 

personal seal of the Bible-famed army-leader, Jaazaniah, 
but also exhumed outstanding examples of antique earthen- 
ware. The diggings here penetrated three distinct layers of 
debris, each representing the city and culture of a different 
era. In the lowest stratum were found numerous potsherds, 
some of which bore fingerprints which quite evidently had 
been impressed upon the once-soft clay as the original pot- 
ter's trademark. 

In the higher levels, each separated from the lowest and 
oldest by many centuries, were discovered other fragments, 
and some undamaged jars, similarly marked with digital 
impressions. Subsequent examination disclosed the re- 
markable fact that all of these vessels had been made by 
the same person. Receptacles formed by the artisan in the 
earliest city had braved the devastating invasions that 
decimated their natal-place, and humbly endured to be 
utilized successively by ensuing posterity. 

Could a venerable relic, such as one of these, find voice 
to tell its wondrous tale, how eagerly would curious 
modern ears hearken to the strange biography. A chronicle 
of conquest it would be, of fierce and heavy-browed men 
who smote with spear and sword. And through the peace- 
ful time, what stories would unfold of dark-eyed Ruths 
and Rachaels hasting to a lovers' tryst beside a befriending 
well, with the ever-present jar adroitly balanced upon a 
white and shapely shoulder. 

Or perhaps within the iniquitous den of some old 
alchemist or evil sorcerer, in what weird purposes may the 
jar have found usage? It could have been borne by a vic- 
torious soldier in Gideon's army at the historic battle of 
the jars and lamps, when he marched against the 
Midianites. 

(To Be Continued) 

Frank H. Dunham 



THE DOLL HOUSE 

SELECTIVE FOOD and PASTRY 
We Invite Your Patronage 



1427 EL CAMINO REAL 



SAN CARLOS. CALIF. 



Phone San Carlos 4 73 



Stanley Bongren. Prop. 



LAUREL COCKTAIL LOUNGE 



540 LAUREL STREET 



SAN CARLOS, CALIF. 



Service to His Majesty — The Baby 



H. R. Wood 



SANITARY DIAPER SERVICE 

EXCLUSIVE BABY LAUNDRY 

748-752 EL CAMINO REAL SAN CARLOS, CALIF. 



JOHN E. KERBER 

BAIL BOND BROKER 



I 



458 SELBY LANE 



MENLO PARK, CALIF. 



Phone Palo Alto 2-2231 

COOKS BILL SEA FOOD MARKET 

EL CAMINO REAL and ROBLE AVENUE MENLO PARK, CALIF. 
Compliments of 

THE RITEX COMPANY 

Manufacturers of Automatic Screw Machine Products 



J. R. WATKINS CO. 

YOUR WATKINS DEALER 



1821 FIFTH STREET 



BERKELEY, CALIF. 



Here's Mud in Your Eye 



2447 SAN PABLO AVENUE 



BERKELEY, CALIF. 



Phone Richmond 453 



Frank A. Silva 



RUDY'S PLACE 



TOWN HOUSE TAP ROOM 

AND LIQUOR STORE 
No Better Spot In Town - Where All Good Fellows Meet 



222 7 MACDONALD AVENUE 



RICHMOND, CALIF. 



Phone Richmond 3 182 



(Andy) Andrew B. George 



329 TENTH STREET 



RICHMOND, CALIF. 



Phone Richmond 5472 



GEORGE BROS 

BEVERAGE DISTRIBUTORS 



EVELYN'S 

COATS, SUITS, DRESSES, MILLINERY 



92 7 MACDONALD AVE. 402 TENTH ST., Carquinez Hotel BIdg. 
RICHMOND, CALIF. 



355 PORTOLA 



RICHMOND. CALIF. 



Delivery to Any Part of City 

S . W. A YOOB 

GROCERIES, FRUITS and VEGETABLES - BUTTER and EGGS 



2 146 THIRD STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



June. 1945 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 37 



MORE MILL VALLEY POLICE 
QUESTIONS 8C ANSWERS 

(Continued from page 14) 
private citi:;en and makes no record of the act, nor does the 
citizen. Has any violation of the law been committed? 

A. The provisions of the deadly weapons act relating to 
records of sales, refer to dealers and persons in the business 
of selling, leasing or otherwise transferring firearms, and 
do not apply to personal sales. 

Q. Can a search warrant be served at any time of day 
or night? 

A. A search warrant directs when it can be served. It 
cannot be executed in the night time unless the Magistrate 
has so directed in the warrant. 

Q. How young a child may legally be a witness? 

A. Every child over ten years of age is presumed to be 
a competent witness. There is no other limitation. When 
children are younger, the test is as to whether they have 
the mental ability to record impressions and repeat what 
they have experienced. Children as young as five and a 
half years have often been held legally competent. 

Q. If a Warrant of Arrest is delivered to an Ofiicer and 
he arrests the defendant, is he liable if the warrant is based 
on a complaint which turns out to be false? 

A. As the Officer had no knowledge of the false charac' 
ter of the complaint on its face, he was fully protected in 
making the arrest. 

Q. Two vehicles, in opposite directions, meet at a nar- 
row point on a steep grade where it is impossible for both 
to proceed. Which driver has the right of way and is the 
other driver legally bound to maneuver his vehicle so the 
other may pass? 

A. The ascending vehicle has the right of way. The 
descending vehicle must yield the right of way and must, 
if necessary, back his vehicle to a place where the other 
vehicle can pass. 

Q. A man commits a crime which is witnessed by only 
one other person who is not a citizen hut an alien resident 
of this country. May this alien make the arrest legally? 

A. Under the law, a private person may make such an 
arrest. He need not be a citizen and may even be an alien. 

Q. An Ofiicer with a warrant walked into a man's 
apartment saying: "I have a warrant for your arrest." The 
suspect asked, "Is my name on it?" Thereupon the Ofiicer 
showed him a warrant calling for the arrest of one "John 



Phone YUkon 0110 



JULLIARD INCORPORATED 

WHOLESALERS and IMPORTERS 

310 TOWNSEND STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



ARMOUR AND COMPANY 



SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone South San Francisco 143 7 

ROGER'S EL DORADO INN 

COCKTAILS 

107 GRAND AVENUE SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Phone South San Francisco 478 

GUERIN BROS. 

GENERAL CONTRACTORS 
208 SOUTH LINDEN AVE. SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Phone San Bruno 974 



Richard Delucchi 



RICHARD DELUCCHI 8c CO. 

BUILDERS 



420 SAN MATEO AVENUE 



SAN BRUNO, CALIF. 



Phone San Bruno 1353 



Mike Holland 



RIO COCKTAIL LOUNGE 



4 14 SAN MATEO AVENUE 



SAN BRUNO, CALIF. 



Phone San Bruno 3873 Mario Lama - Joseph Nutini - Mario Nutini 

TURF CLUB CAFE 

Specializing in Italian Dinners 
COCKTAIL LOUNGE 



715 SAN MATEO AVENUE 



SAN BRUNO, CALIF. 



HOTEL LAKEPORT 

JOS. DUKE. Owner 



LAKEPORT 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone 125 "COMPLETE"!!! Ceci & Ernie 

RAINBOW RESORT 

On Clear Lake, via Hopland Grade 

HORSES - CYCLING - BOATS - CABINS 
Wine and Dine by Candlelight 



Phone Millbrae 2718 Carl Sampson. Jr. 

"THE CROSSROADS" 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE - BAR - DANCING 

EL CAMINO at MILLBRAE AVE. MILLBRAE. CALIF. 

Phone JUniper 4-5937 

CLEVELAND LAUNDRY 



LAKEPORT 



CALIFORNIA 901 -92 I BRAZIL AVENUE 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Page 3S 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



June. J 945 



Doe." Has the suspect the right to refuse service and resist 
because the warrant did not specify his name. 

A. No. If the warrant is in fact intended for him and 
was so issued, the fact that he was not correctly named 
doesn't affect the validity of the warrant. 

Q. Vice Officers see a known prostitute enter her 
apartment with a suspected customer: they have no war- 
rant but knock on the door and demand admittance, say- 
me: "Open the door or we'll break it in." The prostitute 
does not open the door immediately and they break it in. 
Is this within the law? 

A. An Officer may break in to make an arrest after de- 
manding admission and stating the purpose for which ad- 
mission is desired. Since the Officers in this case did not 
state the purpose desired, their act was not lawful. 

Q. Would it be burglar>' to enter a chicken house to 
steal chickens? 

A. Yes. If it had walls on all sides and a roof, even if it 
also had on open door. 

Q. A man armed with a revolver threatens to kill a dog 
unless the owner gives him $10, and. under this threat, the 
owner does so; what is the crime? 

A. First degree Robbery. 

Q. Can a minor be given a death sentence? 

A. Yes. If he was over 1 8 when he committed the crime. 

Q. A citizen demands that an Officer give a traffic cita- 
tion to a violator and volunteers to sign it as the sole wit- 
ness and complainant. How should the Officer proceed? 

A. Citizens have no right to act in connection with 
citations. The citizen could arrest the violator and turn the 
prisoner over to the Officer. 

Q. A person spits at another but misses him. Is this a 
crime? 

A. Yes. A clear case of assault which is defined as an 
unlawful attempt coupled with present ability to commit 
a violent injury' upon the person of another. Any injury, 
no matter how slight, is a violent injury if it is accom- 
plished with some force, even though the force be slight. 
(To Be Continued) 



THE FINEST FOOD WITH DISTINCTIVE SERVICE 



YACHT CLUB CAFE 

Fine Wines, Cocktails and Liquors 

Reservations Appreciated 

NICE and LAKEPORT CUT-OFF 



Phone GArfield 8724 



A. GIURLANI & BRO. 

FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC FOOD PRODUCTS 
Specializing* in Olive Oils. Imported and Domestic Cheese 



53 7 FRONT STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone ORdway 12 72 



GILBOY CO 



SAN FRANCISCO 



666 ELLIS STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone GArfield 3 89 7 



Thomas Hadfield. Vice-President 



American Mutual Liability Insurance Co. 



Allied American Agency, Inc. 

FIFE BUILDING 



1 DRUMM STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone VAlencia 9 746 



PYRAMID HOUSE 

JOS. HOLLACK 



1341 EVANS AVENUE 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone GArfield 3 7 76 



Lee R. Parker 



HOTEL TIFFANY 



Steam Heat - Tub and Shower Baths 



269 OTARRELL STREET, near Mason Street SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone HEmlock 3 165 



L. J. Burley 



Industrial Hard Chrome Plating Co. 

SALVAGE WORK A SPECIALTY 
Specialists in Heavy Chrome Deposits 



1820 FOLSOM STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



HINCHMAN, ROLPH & LANDIS 

CHAPMAN & CO. 



THE SMOKE SHOP 



345 SANSOME STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone EXbrook 6486 



LAKEPORT, CALIFORNIA 



C. SCHILLING CO. 



Specializing in Italian Dinners and American Cuisine 



MILAN CAFE 

FINEST OF DOMESTIC AND IMPORTED LIQUORS 
Ask for Al or Bill; they will give the Best 



WINE MERCHANTS 



109 CLAY STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



LUCERNE. LAKE COUNTY 



Phone SUtter 3630 Manufacturers - Packers - Distributors 

E. F. LANE AND SON 

HONEY - MAPLE PRODUCTS - BEESWAX 
PEANUTS - PEANUT BUTTER 
CALIFORNIA 32 BEALE STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



]une, J 94 5 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 39 



PATROLLING A POLICE BEAT 

(Corittnued from page 18) 
that he has ever investigated; he certainly knew his busi- 
ness, as he so efficiently demonstrated to me, and he did 
not learn these techniques from practical experience. He 
probably was one of those boys who spent a little time 
each day in the study of the law and read in detail the 
description of murder cases occurring in other jurisdic- 
tions, in the daily newspapers. This story about the Sheriff 
substantiates the fact that through study of the law and 
the police experiences in other jurisdictions, that if you are 
faced with the problem of a major criminal case, although 
you have not had the opportunity of practical past prec- 
edent, you will be able to handle the case in a competent 
and efficient manner. 

It is the little things in a patrolman's duty that at times 
indicate his efficiency. You are patrolling your beat and 
you notice a defect in the sidewalk or public street. You 
fail to make a report of this apparent minor, though dan- 
gerous condition. A woman, with a baby in her arms, 
steps into this small hole in the sidewalk, falls and the 
baby is seriously injured. You feel sorry for the unfor- 
unate accident, partially due to your negligence, but you 
reason that it is "one of those things". The fact of the 
matter is that there is a law covering this particular type 
of negligence and the probability is that your city or 
town will be sued and the suit may terminate in a large 
judgment against your municipality. Where and what is 
the law that states this responsibility? Act 5149, of 
the General Laws of this state provides as follows: When' 
ever it is claimed that any person has been injured or any 
property damaged as the result of the dangerous or defec- 
tive condition of any public street, highway, building, 
park, grounds, works, or property, a verified claim for 
damages shall be presented in writing and filed with the 
clerk or secretary of the legislative body of the munici- 
pality, county, city and county, or school district, as the 
case may be, within 90 days after such accident has oc- 
curred. Such claim shall specify the name and address 
of the claimant, the date and place of the accident and 
the extent of the injuries or damages received. The section 
also states that your city attorney must act as attorney 
for the claimant, unless the claimant desires to employ 
other counsel, and that all fees incidental for the suit must 
be paid by the municipality. I have pointed out this par- 
ticular law to you to indelibly impress upon your minds 
the importance of spending at least 20 minutes a day in 
the study of the law. If you know the law, it will be a 



CARMEN'S UNION DIV. 1380 



I 179 MARKET STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



BUNNYS WAFFLE SHOPS 

Convenient Locations: 

400 GEARY STREET 14 7 POWELL STREET 

964 MARKET STREET 1 106 MARKET STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



MAILLEY SEARLES INC. 



300 SEVENTH STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



THE SILVER RAIL 



FRED M. BURKE. Manager 



972 MARKET STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



MATHEWS 8C LIVINGSTON 

INSURANCE UNDERWRITERS 



200 BUSH STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



V. B. R. 
DEL MONTE MEAT CO. 

Jas. Salemi 
75! HOWARD STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

BILL'S SPORTSMEN'S CLUB 



893 MISSION STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone CArfield 9804 



Orbe - J. Orbe, Props. 



St. Thomas 8C Puerto Rico Fruit Products Co. 



442 COMMERCIAL STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



JAI-ALAI CAFE 

SPANISH BASQUE DINNERS 

895 PACIFIC AVENUE. Corner of Powell Street SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone EXbrook 9849 



P. Vuillemainroy Phone EXbrook 6958 

PAUL'S AUTO REPAIR WESTERN ART CO. 

MASTER MECHANICS Photo Frames, All Types - Quality Work For Less 

63 1 CLAY STREET. Bet. Kearny & Montgomery SAN FRANCISCO 543 MARKET STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



Page 40 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



June, J 945 



step in the right direction towards making you a superior 
policeman. 

The bearing, appearance, grooming and general deport- 
ment of a patrolman is of the utmost importance. Bearing, 
dignity, calmness and the natural respect associated with 
the star and uniform and the authority of the people and 
the state which the patrolman represents is more than half 
the battle. Some of us, particularly when we are new in 
police work, become "drunk with authority". We become 
inflated with our own importance, and may, if we are not 
"cooled off" by understanding superiors, use the police 
tactics, to a degree of a member of the "Gestapo". Main- 
tain an impersonal attitude in the enforcement of the law. 
Remember that prosecutions are not conducted in behalf 
of John Doe, patrolman versus Richard Roe, defendant. 
Prosecutions are conducted in behalf of the People of the 
State of California and not the individual patrolman. 

When on duty in uniform keep in mind your personal 
appearance; we have already mentioned about proper 
grooming; clean uniform, clean linen, shoes shined, and 
metal polished. Pay particular attention to your posture; 
the buildings and lampposts on your beat do not need the 
support of your stalwart shoulders. You are on parade 
before the public; your every action is observed. When on 
duty maintain the posture of a "West Pointer". 

There are many irksome assignments for the patrolman 
in police work. We old-timers have had our share of them; 
street car strikes, waterfront strikes, watching picket lines 
in front of stores, parades, details for large gatherings at 
the City Auditorium; tiresome, irksome, fatiguing. It is all 
part of the job. Personally, I do not believe that policemen 
should be assigned to more than two hours on a fixed post 
detail without a short relief. When a person becomes tired 
he loses his alertness. When you are assigned to a fixed 
post detail stay put. The success of the whole police assign- 
ment may depend upon you. This type of detail does not 
come so often that we cannot put up with some incon- 
venience if it leads to the efficiency of the department. 

A patrolman should become familiar with the location 
of the police call boxes and fire bo.xes located on his beat 
so that no time would be lost in sending in a call for 
police or fire assistance; it is also a good idea to know the 
location of available private telephones so that they may 
be used in case of an emergency. 

This has been rather a long dissertation on the art of 
patrolling but when we consider that the patrolman is the 
bulwark of a police department, the suggestions may be 
of some value to the "front line" of police work. 

Phone UNderhill 0101 Daniel Dee 

DEE ENGINEERING CO. 

FIRE BRICK CONTRACTORS 

170 HOOPER STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone WAInut 9082 

ROD DALEY 

MARINA MEN'S SHOP 
2 172 CHESTNUT STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone MOntrose 9933 Milton Russell. Prop. 

NEW CORT CLEANERS 

CLEANERS 
1J08 20lh AVE.. Across Street from Post Office SAN FRANCISCO 



McLAREN-PARK GROCERY 

WINE - BEER - GROCERIES 
FRUIT - VEGETABLES 



298 MUNICH STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CHAS. P. HART TRANSPORTATION CO. 



1025 TENNESSEE STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



UNITED DRUG CO. 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

NEW COTTAGE HILL GROCETERIA 

FINE GROCERIES 

3798 MISSION STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

ANDREW and ASIMOS 

Wines, Liquors and Groceries 
163 SEVENTH STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

ACE HIGH 

WHERE GOOD FELLOWS MEET 
150 SIXTH STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

SOUTH BASIN GROCERY 



2847 INGALLS STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



STANDARD EGG CO. 



Wholesale Only 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



GRIFFITHS LUNCH 

Good Food - Reasonable Prices 

139 EIGHTH STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone VAIencia 10247 

DIAMOND INN 

HAS GOOD BEER 

25 74 THIRD STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

PUERTO RICO CAFE 

42 18 THIRD STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

LAZVATIN MARKET 

GROCERIES - BEER - WINE 



926 DE HARO STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA PUB TAVERN 

WINE - BEER - LIQUORS 



262 THIRD STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone UNderhill 4358 

R. & L. GROCERY 

Fresh Fruits and Vegetables and Cold Meats 
Complete Line of Beer and Wine 

1310 I8ih STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone DOuglas 3857 



"everything but the baby" 



E. J. FEISEL CO. 

Manufacturers & Wholesalers of Babies', Infants* & Children's Wear 
334 MISSION STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



June, 1945 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 41 



CHIEF COLLINS 

(Continued from page 7 ) 
J. A. Mansfield, Vernon Bradbury, Irvin Bedford, and 
H. R. Estes and Mrs. Page. 

Lieutenant Wood, who is the top man under the Chief, 
has been with the department since 1922. A native of 
Santa Cruz, he joined the regular army in 1913, saw 
service in Europe during World War I, did a little sea- 
faring and tried his hand as a cowboy, but finally decided 
if he wanted a permanent home he had better find some 
other line of endeavor. He decided a place on the Red- 
wood City Police Department would meet this idea and 
so he became a member. He proved a good officer from 
the start and has cHmbed to the highest rank next to the 
chief. 

He follows the policy of Chief Collins to serve with 
courtesy and give to all who apply for police advice and 
help the fullest attention and cooperation. 

They tell a story about Lieutenant Wood that illus- 
trates how far he will go in this regard. 

A short time ago a young soldier, returning from the 
South Pacific, entered police headquarters and the Lieu- 
tenant went to the counter to sec what he wanted. The 
visitor said he was an Oklahoman and was looking for 
another man from his native city in Oklahoma. 

Lieutenant Wood asked him the name of the man he 
sought. (He has a list of some 6000 names in his files of 
people residing in Redwood City.) The young man said 
he did not know the man's name. He added that his par- 
ents had written him to look the man up, but had failed 



Phone MArket 4613 



2 10 SIXTH STREET 



2 10 CLUB 



Harry Politis. Prop. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone UNderhill 9 12 1 



Nello Masetti 



BELL CLUB 



IT'S NOT THE MAN IN YOUR LIFE THAT COUNTS 
IT'S THE LIFE IN YOUR MAN 



164 EIGHTH STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone VAIencia 8704 



T. H. Blair 



CRUCIBLE BRASS FOUNDRY 

BRASS, BRONZE & ALUMINUM CASTINGS 
2255 FOLSOM STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone ATwater 3442 E. D. Alpen • Al Howe 

ALPEN & HOWE 

Auto and Truck Painting - Sign Work and Lettering 
2373 FOLSOM STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone Mission 949 1 

G . LANZA 

Sweet and Dry Wine and Beer 
Vermouth - Domestic and Imported - and Liquor 



Phone DOuglas 7883 

L. & L. MARKET 

Vegetables, Groceries, Dressed Poultry and Meats 
Wine, Beer and Liquors 

474 THIRD STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

GOLDEN CITY CLEANERS 

BEST WORK - REASONABLE PRICES 

5 177 THIRD STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone VAIencia 8661 



John Bluth. Prop. 



JOHN'S PLACE 



2201 19th STREET. Corner Vermont 



S.AN FRANCISCO 



Phone Mission 3270 

VITTORI BROS. 

FRUITS, VEGETABLES and POULTRY, FANCY GROCERIES 

382026 MISSION STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone ELkridge 172 1 

D. BASILI 3C SON GROCERIES 

Imported and Domestic 

GROCERIES, POULTRY and FRUITS 

6271 THIRD STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



LEONARD'S MARKET 



2626 SAN BRUNO AVENUE 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone DOuglas 9396 



Ted - Nick 



THE OLD GLORY CLUB 



All Kinds of Mixed Drinks by Expert Bartenders 
KNOWN FROM COAST TO COAST 



276 THIRD STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Grocery Phone RAndoIph 1753 



Butcher Phone DEIaware 1689 



ETALO MARKET 

Groceries That Are Fresh and at Reasonable Prices Always 
Meats - Fish - Poultry - Fruits - Vegetables 

2714 SAN BRUNO AVE. Parodi Bros. SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone RAndoIph 9200 



Guy Grosini 



THE OLD SHACK 



Service With A Smile 

2998 SAN BRUNO AVENUE 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone Mission 9122 



Emilio Picchi 



EMILIO'S CAFE 



COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

Reservations for Dinner by Appointment 

2502-2562 THIRD STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone VAIencia 3 04 1 

TALBOT REFINING COMPANY 

LUBRICATING OILS 
1449 CARROLL .AVENUE SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone VAIencia 2244 Luncheon - Steamed Clams Tony Devincenzi 

DEVINCENZI'S 4-MILE HOUSE 

Italian Dinners - Chiopino Dinners on Friday Evenings 
Wines - Cocktail Lounge - San Francisco's Oldest Landmark 



5301 THIRD STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone UNderhill 6122 



J. Mellen, Mgr. 



ATLAS STEAM CLEANING SERVICE 

Truck and Passenger Car Lubrication and Washing 
Chassis - Motors - Road Machinery - Paint Stripping 



5006 THIRD STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 555 SEVENTH STREET, bet. Bryant & Brannan SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone UNderhill 9480 

THE HUB TAVERN 

CEO. EMMETT, Prop. 
1680 MARKET STREET 



Phone HEmlock 9144 



M. Nello - S. Ciusti - V. Aiello 



THREE PAL'S CAFE 

LUNCHES - DINNERS - FINE WINES and LIQUORS 
Next to Home, It is The Best Place to Eat 

SAN FRANCISCO 3 15 1 17th STREET, bet. So. Van Ness & Folsom SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone WAlnul 173 7 



Phone HEmlock 2 742 



POST STREET 

AUCTION STUDIO 



THE SPERRY 8C HUTCHINSON CO. 



1863.1867 POST STREET 



Auction Every Wednesday 



SAN FRANCISCO 



1446 MARKET STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Page 42 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



June, 1945 



to give his name, but his folks said this man had married 
a young woman whose name, we will say, was Brown, but 
no first name. The Lieutenant, somewhat at a loss just 
where to start in his desire to give service, kept question- 
ing the boy about the letter he had received from home. 
The boy said the man he was seeking had been married 
about three months before and the woman he married had 
two children, and that in her native city she was a taxi 
driver. 

The .taxi companies were contacted but had never em- 
ployed any woman by the name or description given. 
Then Lieutenant Wood went to the Greyhound depot, 
and there he found there was a young woman who had 
been married a few months before, and that she had two 
children. She was located and was the wife of the man 
the returned soldier was looking for. 

Just before he left the country to return to the Jap- 
anese war :one, he called on Lieutenant Wood to thank 
him. He said: "I sure gave you a mighty little to work on 
but you sure did get someplace for me with what little I 
gave. When I was home I told my folks my experience 
and we all agreed that it was a pleasant surprise to find 
a police department so willing to help out a stranger in 
what might be called an unimportant matter. I'll surely 
never forget your kindness." 

Phone Redwood 87 

LOUVRE FRENCH LAUNDRY 



72 1 MAIN STREET 



REDWOOD CITY, CALIF. 



Phone Redwood 1698 



E. E. Engdahl, Prop. 



ENGD AHL'S 

FUNITURE - PAINTS - WALL PAPER 
2396 BROADWAY REDWOOD CITY. CALIF. 



Phone GRaystone 6600 Mrs. H. C. Tyrrell. Manager 

ARMSTRONG'S U DRIVE 

RENTACAR 

103 7 GEARY STREET, bet. Polk and Van Ness SAN FRANCISCO 

H.F. SLEEPER 

General Agent 
THE LINCOLN NATIONAL LIFE INSURANCE CO. 

5 19 CALIFORNIA ST.. Calif, and Montgomery SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone HEmlock 9656 



Hector Durieux 



Fender House and Standard Auto Wreckers 



1632 MISSION STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone GArfteld 683 7 



Mr. and Mrs. Edw. R. Dathe, Sr., Mgr. Own. 



SEABOARD HOTEL 

Best Value for the Money - 250 Rooms - Steam Heat 
Hot and Cold Water in Every Room - Showers, Tub Baths 



226 EMBARCADERO, opp. Piers 16 and 18 



SAN FRANCISCO 



POST & BRODERICK SERVICE STATION 

BEN GOLDSTEIN 



2399 POST STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



. . . Still at the Same Stand . . . 
BOLDEMANN CHOCOLATE CO 

Phone UNderhill 6948 

THOR . . . Washers - Ironers 

THOR PACIFIC COMPANY 

Factory Branch 

1434 HOWARD STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone UNderhill 2991 

J. C. FLETCHER 

Factory Representative and Service Engineer 



1415 FOLSOM STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



SAN FRANCISCO STEVEDORING CO. 



SMOKE SHOP 

BEER - CANDY - MAGAZINES 
945 MAIN STREET REDWOOD CITY. CALIF. 

POP'S PLACE 

MIDDLEFIELD RD. & DOUGLAS AVE. REDWOOD CITY, CALIF. 

WASHBURN 8C CONDON 

LIVESTOCK MARKET AGENCY 



35 BRANNAN STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



SO. SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



MAGNANI'S MARKET 

515 EL CAMINO REAL REDWOOD CITY. CALIF. 



JOE'S PLACE 

BEER - GROCERIES 



2202 MIDDLEFIELD ROAD 
Phone S. M. 5 0191 



REDWOOD CITY. CALIF. 
A. Sutter 



SUTTER'S UPHOLSTERING CO. 

Creators of CUSTOM-BUILT FURNITURE 
For More Than 10 Years 

22I5^EL CAMINO REAL SAN MATEO, CALIF. 



Phone GArfield 52 5 8 

MORGAN & SAMPSON 

SUPERIOR SELLING SERVICE 
869 FOLSOM STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone YUkon 1238 

O'BRIEN IRON WORKS 

Office and Works 
222 PERRY STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



HALLINAN MACKIN LUMBER CO. 

HARDWOOD LUMBER - PANELS - BOX SHOOK 



MONADNOCK BUILDING 



SAN FRANCISCO 



JACK PINSLER 

CIGARS and LIQUORS 

1698 MARKET STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

STAR POOL PARLOR 

POOL and BILLIARDS 

1555 WEBSTER STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone UNderhill 6705 

TONY 8C DANNY'S PLACE 

BEER - WINE - SOFT DRINKS 
186 THIRD STREET SAN FRANCISCO 548 NATOMA STREET 



June, 194S 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 43 



SCHOOL SAFETY PATROLS IN REVIEW 

(Continued /?-07?i page 13) 
Daniel Webster, Grant, Parkside, and Paul Revere. 

Third Battalion: Redding and JeiTerson tied; Dudley 
Stone and Fairmont tied; Grattan and Visitacion Valley 
tied; Pacific Heights, Francis Scott Key, and Columbus. 

Fourth Battalion: St. Brigids, St. Phillips, and Star of 
the Sea tied; St. Anne's, St. Dominic's and St. Paul's tied; 
St. Charles, St. James, St. John's, and St. Vincent de 
Paul's. 

Fifth Battalon : Fremont, John Muir, and 'Winfield Scott 
tied; Emerson and Raphael Weill tied; Sunnyside, Bay 
View, Marshall, and Golden Gate. 

Sixth Battalion: Alamo, Alvarado, and Sutro tied; 
Edison, Cabrillo, Franklin, Kate Kennedy, and Monroe. 

Seventh Battalion: Madison, Frank McCoppin, and 
George Peabody tied; Bret Harte and Sheridan tied; 
Garfield, Guadalupe, and Longfellow tied; Yerba Buena, 
Junipero Serra, and Glen Park. 

Eighth Battalion: Argonne, Lafayette, and Sherman 
tied; Andrew Jackson and Commodore Sloat tied; San 
Miguel, Farragut, Le Conte, and Starr King. 

Ninth Battalion: Bryant and West Portal tied; Com- 
modore Stockton and Hancock -Cooper tied; William 
McKinley and Washington Irving tied; Jean Parker, Ed- 
ward R. Taylor, and Cleaveland. 

Tenth Battalion: St. Agnes, St. Joseph's, and Sacred 
Heart tied; Most Holy Redeemer, St. Emydius, and SS. 
Peter and Paul's tied; Joan of Arc, Corpus Christi, St. An- 
thony's, and St. Monica's. 

Eleventh Battalion (Junior High School) : Roosevelt 
and Presidio tied; Aptos and Marina tied; Horace Mann, 
Portola, John Swett, and Francisco. 

Compliments of 

STERN 8C GRUPP 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 

MILLS BUILDING SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone WAlnut 9872 



We Deliver 



Phone HEmlock 0982 



Free Estimates 



W. E. LIVELY & SON 

Frame Straightening' and Wheel Alignment 

Official Brake Station 

160 HAYES STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone WEst 65 17 

Compliments of 

MME. L. LOUSTAU & CO. 

FRENCH LAUNDRY 

3650 SACRAMENTO STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone Mission 4423 Branches; Napa - Monterey 

ROTHSCHILD JEWELRY CO. 

Since 19 13 
DIAMONDS - WATCHES - JEWELRY - Payment Plan 

2578 MISSION STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



YNGOJO BROS. 

GROCERIES - MEATS - WINES - BEER 



15 50 WEBSTER STREET, corner Post 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone Mission 873 1 



C. B. Wilson. Manager 



C. B. 'WILSON ROOFING CO. 

Quality Roofs - Repairing - Damp and Water Proofing 
Enameling - Ships Coatings 



75 MONTCALM STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



IRVING SALES CO. 



3001 22nd STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone Mission 5736 

METZ CREAM DOUGHNUTS 

BEST QUALITY 

2 778 24th STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone Mission 9577 



Herb Jackson - Ralph Chiappetta 



SHUFFLE BOARD CLUB 



2 798 BRYANT STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Compliments of 

H. S. KOMOR 



2409 IRVING STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone EXbrook 7865 Res. Phone Los Altos 2059 

DALEY BROTHERS 

GENERAL CONTRACTORS 

426 BRYANT STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

CALIFORNIA CHAIN STORES ASSN. 

MONADNOCK BUILDING SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone EVergreen 9787 Frank 

FRANK'S FIREPLACE 

PIANO & SOLOVOX ENTERTAINMENT 
Where We Meet Again 

1840 HAIGHT STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone Mission 5218 

CRESCI SEA FOOD GROTTO 

Specializing in Crabs, Fish, Sea Food Cocktails, Oysters 



Popular Prices 
3 18 BAYSHORE BOULEVARD 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone ORdway 04 12 Electrical Construction - Air Conditioning 

CORY & JOSLIN, INC. 

CONTRACTING ENGINEERS 
Heating and Ventilating - Pumping Equipment - Power Plants 

5 12 GOLDEN GATE AVENUE SAN FRANCISCO 



MARTIN SHIP SERVICE 

2051 THIRD STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

CAPITAL RICE MILLS 

260 CALIFORNIA STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



A. OLIVER, The Trapper 

FURS 



2285 MISSION STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phones: SUtter 0387; Res. Mission 6504 



L. Balogh, Mgr. 



L. & M. PATTERN WORKS 

PATTERN MAKERS and MODEL BUILDERS 
45 5 FOLSOM STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



DEBS DEPARTMENT STORES 

2430 MISSION STREET 1643 FILLMORE STREET 

2062 MISSION STREET 13 18 STOCKTON STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



GOLDEN GATE POULTRY 



2254 THIRD STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Page 44 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



June, 194S 



BAY CITIES BUSINESS DIRECTORY 



Phone AShberry 7113 

STONE BROS. 

Home Furnishings 

2484 Shattuck Avenue Berkeley, Calif. 

Phone Hlghgate 4075 Henry G. Shapiro 

California Scrap Iron Corporation 

Plants Oakland. San Francisco, Pittsburg 
23 10 Peralta Street Oakland. Calif. 

Phone Piedmont 6600 Res, OLympic 5152 

HARVEY BLAIR AND CO. 

Really Investments - Property Managers 

3817 San Pablo Avenue Emeryville, Calif. 

Phone OLympic 8332 

L. J. KRUSE CO. 

Plumbing and Heating 
6247 College Avenue Oakland, Calif. 

Phone 5 00 

SAVIN'S DRUG STORE 

(Sav-in-Drugs) 

4th and Macdonald Ave. Richmond, Calif. 



Hhone Richmond 477 



Edna Crane, Mgr. 



E. C. CRANE 

Linoleum - Window Shades - Venetian Blinds 

Carpets - Rugs 
2011 Macdonald Avenue Richmond, Calif. 

CHELEMEDOS MARKET 

Groceries - Fruits - Vegetables 

Free Delivery 

1251 Solano Avenue Albany. Calif. 

THE CALIFORNIA 

Bottled Beer - Bottled and Bulk Wines 
Cigars - Cigarettes 

1716 Macdonald Avenue Richmond, Calif. 

Phone Richmond 192-J 

FINNISH STEAM BATHS 

Massage "for your health" 

Week Days: 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. 
5 1 5 Tenth Street Richmond, Calif. 

Ph. Richmond 2446 "A Complete Food Store" 

7th STREET MARKET 

Meat, Poultry, Fish, Groceries. Vegetables 

Cor. 7th and Macdonald Richmond, Calif. 



Phone Richmond 2 74 



v. E. Bergstrom 



W. F. FRASER, OPT. D. 

Optometrist 

919 Macdonald Avenue Richmond. Calif. 

Phone RAndolph 13 00 

N. J. FARRAH Department Store 

4458-60 Mission Street 

opp. Excelsior Avenue San Francisco 

Phone WEst 3226 

New Fillmore Beauty Salon 

Any Desired Hair Style 

913 Fillmore St., nr. Fulton San Francisco 



Phone Richmond 273 1 

MOSS ROSE BAKERY 

For Better Bakery Products 

720 Macdonald Avenue Richmond, Calif. 



Phone BAyview 652 7 



J. Wormser 



RELIABLE REBRICKING CO. 

Specializing in Rebricking Boilers 
Oil Burners and Furnaces Repaired 

3833 California Street San Francisco 

Phone GArfield 43 78 

A. M AD SE N 

Printing and Lithographic Machinery 

Mechanical Engineer 

126 Perry Street San Francisco 



Phone UNderhiU 4563 



Hugh J. Maclean 



MACLEAN'S MACHINE SHOP 

Diesel - Genera! - Automotive 

4 70 Eighth Street San Francisco 



PACIFIC FIRE INSURANCE CO. 



463 California Street 



San Francisco 



Phone Mission 3739 Night Call JU. 4-6812 

DR. WALTER E. SCHOTT 

DENTIST 

3 32 3 Mission Street San Francisco 

PIONEER SOAP CO. 



16th and Carolina Streets 



San Francisco 



THE WOODWORKING SHOP 



2 74 Shotwell Street 



San Francisco 



Phone Valencia 9638 Steve & Mary Gazzera 

MONTE CARLO CAFE 

Light Lunches, Sandwiches, Cigars 
Wines and Liquors 

1 703 Yosemite Ave, nr. 3rd St. San Francisco 

Phone VAlencia 9668 

SUNNYDALE WINE CO. 

wholesale Distributors 

2936 24th Street San Francisco 

Phone EXbrook 9898 Fannie Pedersen. Prop. 

PEDERSEN'S 

RESTAURANT and Bar 

499 Third Street San Francisco 

Phone ORdway 39 13 

FAIRMONT COFFEE SHOP 



1000 Bush Street 



San Francisco 



Phone MOntrose 5969 

WEBBERS SHOPPE 

Men's Wear - Children's Wear 

Ladies' Apparel 

68 West Portal Avenue San Francisco 



Phone MArket 9873 

HARRY'S CUSHION SHOP 

Truck Cushions - Tops and Curtains 

I 144 Howard Street San Francisco 

Phone HEmlock 426 1 G. Adame. Prop. 

CENTRAL MARKET 

Camiceria Y Abarrotes-Servicio A Domicilio 

429 Ninth Street San Francisco 

Phone MArket 2 100 

The American Ambulance Co. 

Mrs. Gus Sober, Proprietress 

146 Central Avenue San Francisco 

J. J. MOORE & CO., INC. 

SHIPPING MERCHANTS 
IMPORTERS AND EXPORTERS 

45 1 Montgomery Street San Francisco 

Fidelity 8C Deposit Co., of Maryland 



Financial Center BIdg. 



San Francisco 



Phone WAlnut 2869 

FREDERICKSEN HARDWARE 

Complete Line of Hardware 

3029 Fillmore St., nr. Union, San Francisco 

EXbrook 4005 Harvey Lum. Mgr. 

Andy Wong's 

Mission Trails Restaurant 

Restaurant 

500 Sutter St. at Powell San Francisco 



ALBERT SALON 



Sir Francis Drake Hotel 



San Francisco 



Phone GArfield 6738 



Waller E. Pixley 



HOB AR T 

Food Preparing Machines 

929 Mission Street San Francisco 



945 


BAY CITY 

Market Street 


MARKET 

San Francisco 


Phone GArfield 1854 

HOTEL 

108 Fourth Street 


IRWIN 

San 


Francisco 




Phone HEmlock 0475 

The White House Cleaners 

174 Fourteenth Street San 


dC Dyers 

Francisco 



Phone PRospect 94 74 Remo Durighello 

CARUSO'S 

Fine Italian Foods 
Home of the Rotary Cooker 

136 Taylor Street San Francisco 



J. F. PAGENDARM 



Phone RAndolph 7331 

We Own and Operate Our Own Cleaning Plant 

MOUNT DAVIDSON 
CLEANERS & DYERS 

WORK CALLED FOR AND DELIVERED 
Quality Service 

We Give S & H Green Stamps 

769 MONTEREY BOULEVARD 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Telephone GArfield 7010 

Connecting All Departments 

GLASER BROS. 

WHOLESALE 
CIGARS and TOBACCOS 

WINES— LIQUORS— CANDIES 



OAKLAND 
900 Harrison Street 



SACRAMENTO 
916 12th Street 



475 FOURTH STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



June, 194? 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 4-! 



Phone Mission 1267 

RALPH & FRANK'S ASSOCIATED SERVICE 

AERO BATTERIES — FISK TIRES 

2 5 th & VALENCIA SAN FRANCISCO 



CAL'S FOUNTAIN 



910 MARKET STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone EXbrook 6464 



Pure Distilled Water 



PURITY SPRING WATER CO. 

Spring Water from "Marvelous Marin" Co. 

2030 KEARNY STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone VAlencia !633 Open Day and Night 

MANHATTAN LUNCH CO. 

Quality Foods - Popular Prices 

2597 MISSION STREET, Comer 22nd SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone GRaystone 95 71 

MRS. JULIA BENNALLACK 



GUEST HOUSE 



1265 PINE STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



BUY WAR BONDS 
AND STAMPS 



Phone RAndolph 8535-8536 



Henry Greenberg 



BORELLO'S CLEANING & DYEING CO. 

CLEANERS OF QUALITY 

2695 SAN BRUNO AVENUE SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone EXbrook 9674 

THE HULA SHACK 



979 FOLSOM STREET 



BAR 

The Friendly Tavern 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone UNderhill 8135 



Albert Ish 



Compliments of 



MATSON NAVIGATION CO. 



Phone SUtter 3114 



U. S. PIPE 8C MANUFACTURING CO. 

PIPE - VALVES - FITTINGS - FABRICATING 



249 FIRST STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Compliments of 

EDWARD BROWN 8c SONS 

Pacific Coast Insurance General Agents 



432 CALIFORNIA STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Seeding • Transplanting • Growing 




CENTRAL UPHOLSTERING CO. 



1284 MISSION STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone RAndolph 9734 



Michael A. King 



RICHFIELD SERVICE STATION 



4300 MISSION STREET, Cor. Silver Avenue 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone RAndolph 5102 Alterations Our Specialty 

SMITH'S CLEANERS & DYERS 

SUITS CLEANED AND PRESSED 

6256 THIRD STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone DElaware 2411 

P. KANSORA 

STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES 

599 MOSCOW STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



SCAVENGER'S LUNCH 

BEER - WINE - GOOD MEALS 



1624 SIXTH STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone DElaware 6778 

TI-TOP-RODRIGUES 

BEER - WINE - GROCERIES - VEGETABLES 

598 ATHEAN STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone UNderhill 9464 

JOE'S PLACE 

All Kinds of Wine, Beer and Other Liquors 



1200 18th STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



LAST CHANCE 

BEER - SOFT DRINKS - SANDWICHES 
and GOOD FOOD 



366 THIRD STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



REDWOOD THEATRES, INC. 



988 MARKET STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



DAN E. LONDON, General Manager 



OCCIDENTAL PLATING WORKS INC. 

PLATING - POLISHING - OXIDIZING 
On All Metalware - Enameling 



2259 FOLSOM STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



HUGH F. HALL 



HOTEL ST. FRANCIS 

One of the World's Greatest Hotels 



22 70 THIRD STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



ATOMIZED METALS CO. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 81-83 SHIPLEY STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Page 46 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



June. 194S 



ROBBERY 



SAN FRANCISCO POLICE DEPARTMENT 

San Francisco, California May 25. 1945 

On May 23rd, 1945. at about 9:25 A. M., SOL RISKIN. owner and proprietor of the PIONEER LOAN OFFICE, at 419 
Kearny Street. San Francisco, was held up and robbed by two armed bandits at his place of business and diamonds, jewelry, watches, 
etc.. were stolen amounting to $40,000.00 There was also $1,200.00 in currency taken. 

MODUS OPERANDI:' The two suspects were waiting at the entrance to his place of business and when he opened up the store 
the two suspects followed victim into the store and told him it was a holdup and pointed their guns at him and then tied hira with 
his hands behind his hack with a white cord rope and made him lie on the floor. Then they asked him for the combination of the 
safe. He gave the combination to them but the bandits were unable to open the safe. They then untied the victim and made him open 
the safe and then retired him and placed him on the floor again. They then emptied all the jewelry into a brown leather handbag, 
telescope tvpe, size 24" x 14". \ 8". and left the premises. 

DESCRIPTIONS: No. 1 — White, Male — 35-40 years, 6' 0", 175-180 lbs., wearing hght grey suit, dark hat, well dressed, and 
used a blue steel .32 cal. automatic. 

No. 2 — White. Male — 27-30 years, 5' 6", 165 lbs., grey suit, dark hat. well dressed, and used a blue steel revolver. 
Kindly forward any information that may be obtained in connection with this crime to 

CHARLES W. DULLEA, Chief of Police. 

San Francisco, Calif. 



DESCRIPTION OF STOLEN PROPERTY 

1 .38 cal. Smith 6? Wesson Nickel Plated Revolver, Serial 

15226 
1 very small Ladies Lapel Swiss Watch with 5 diamonds set 

in enamel. 14 karat 
1 Ladies Platinum Wrist Watch, roses around dial, platinum 

bracelet attached with about 25 diamonds 
1 Swiss Stop Watch, of. split 2nd, No. 80470-70470 



12 



16. engraving on back, "Johnny 
old Watch, heavy, M 11791574. C 



Elgin R R Watch. 

Ham" 
Elgin Hunting Case 

32J839 
Watches, Hamilton. Illinois. Elgin, various sizes 
1 Gents Longines Wrist Watch. M 5870586, C T064883 
1 Waltham Gents Wrist Watch. M 39504. C 419601 
1 Hamilton Gents Wrist Watch, M SS42530. C S243613 
1 Hamilton Gents Wrist Watch. M 0117856, C 0964354 
1 Waltham Gents Wrist Watch, M 1246840 
1 Omega Swiss Watch (wrist), M 9516045. CS241704 
1 Gents Longines Wrist Watch, M 6021001, C 2024084. pink 

gold 
1 Bulova Gents Wrist Watch. M 7AP-2508695 
1 Lord Elgin Pink Gold Wrist Watch. M C443828, C 106837 
1 Lord Elgin Wrist Watch, M C378900, C E-437737 
1 Chnton Gents Wrist Watch, M CXH-882743 
1 Octo Swiss Wrist Watch, C 6512 
1 Girard Wrist Watch 

1 Waltham Gents Wrist Watch. M 430038. C L37076 
1 Ladies Pink Gold Wrist Watch, C RXM-8345. set with 5 

small diamonds and 5 rubies 
1 of. Howard Watch, M 97702 5, C 4419051 
1 Rolert Gents Wrist Watch. Cannot open on back: engraved 

"Jack from Scarlet". 
1 of. Hamilton Watch. M 1609112, C 869107 
1 Ladies Round Platinum Watch set with 34 diamonds around 

dial, black ribbon 
1 Ladies Platinum Oblong Square Watch set with about 27 

diamonds 
1 17J Gruen. Very Thin, pink dial, size 12, M 2-348353, C 

Gil 4669 
1 21 J Waltham Riverside, size 12, gents 
1 17J Elgin, gold filled case, size 12, diamond shape monogram 

covered up 
1 7J 14 K Gold Elgin Hunting Case, brass movement, size 6, 



M 6921409. C 64517 
2 Swiss Make, 14 K Gold Thin Models, one dial very dirty, 

open face (gents) 
1 18 K Howard, very heavy hunting case, size 16, M 57435, 

C 8740 (gents) 
1 18 K Key Winder make, enamel, size 10 
1 14 K Hunting Case Howard, gents, size 18 
1 Gents 19J Hunting Case, Elgin, size 12 
1 17J International, very thin. 14 K. size 12 
1 14 K Longines Gents Wrist Watch, set with 3 diamonds in 

dial, 8LN-38288, in long aluminum display case 
1 Eska 14 K gold. 17J sweep 2nd hand. Wrist Watch, pink 

dial and pink bracelet 
1 Eska Wrist Watch, 18 K gold water-proof steel, back sweep 

2nd hand, luminous dial. M 12136, C 18 
1 Pink 7J Swiss Gents Wrist Watch 
1 17 K Gold 17J Swiss Gents Wrist Watch 
1 17J Bulova Wrist Watch, nickel case 
1 15J Waltham Gold-filled Case Wrist Watch 
1 7J Swiss Wrist Watch 
1 7J Elgin Wrist Watch 
About 500 pieces assorted jewelry, described as Nuggets, Gold 
Dust. Gold Coins, Lockets. Chains. Charms, Bracelets, 
Pins. Cigarette Cases, Ear Rings. Pen y Pencil Sets, 
WM y YM Diamond Rings, Brooches, Cameo Rings 
and Brooches and other costume jewelry 
Gold Thimbles 

75 pairs of Gold, Diamond and Platinum Link Buttons 
Gold Pens and Pencil Sets 
Gold Russian Jewel Box, lYz-in. square, with gold cross and 

chain inside 
Shriner's Button set with 15 diamonds 
Numerous pieces of Antique Jewelry of various descriptions and 

Jewels 
Chinese Jade Rings 

Numerous Diamond Bracelets set with different jewels 
30 Gold Scarf Nugget Pins and various other Scarf Pins 
Numerous Gold and Platinum Watch Chains 

I large Sohd Gold Badge — star-shaped. 8 points, enameled inlav 
with number "56" stamped on back — about 3 inches in 
diameter 
1 50 assorated Ladies Rings with diamonds of different sizes 
50 Gents Signet Rings — plain and some set with various stones 
1 large Bar Pin (platinum) — 3 in x I/2 in., with about 78 
diamonds and large grey pearl in center 



N. CERVELLI & CO. 



3309 FILLMORE STREET 



S.AN FRANCISCO 



GEORGE M. PHILPOTT CO. 

Rock Drilling Equipment - Ball and Roller Bearings 

Compressor Rental Service - Pumps - Wire Rope - Pillow Blocks 

Oil Seals - Bronze Stock 



I 160 BRYANT STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone CArfield 1809 

ATKINSON-STUTZ CO. 

WHOLESALE LUMBER AND ITS PRODUCTS 
112 MARKET STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



CArfield 8417.8418 Jerome A. Solomon 

GENERAL FIXTURE CO. 

Counters - Stools - Booths - Crockery - Glassware 
Silverware - Utensils - - Sheet Metal Works 

HOTEL and RESTAURANT SUPPLIES 

COMPLETE INSTALLATIONS 

953 MISSION STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone \^Alnut 56^6 General Repairing 

THE UNION HARDWARE CO. 

Household Goods, Electrical Supplies, Paints, Glass 

Garden Tools, Keys 

MAYTAG WASHING MACHINES - HOT POINT APPLIANCES 

IRONRITE IRONERS 

2 162 UNION STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Telephone DOuglas 2 93 1 

DAN. T. CASSIDY 

CURTAIN, DRAPERY AND SLIP COVER MFRS. 

677 MISSION STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



June. 1945 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 47 



SUCCESSFUL STATE ALCOHOLIC 
BEVERAGE CONTROL PROGRAM 

California, and especially the San Francisco area, has 
pioneered in this nation's progress toward a successful 
alcoholic beverage control program, according to Com- 
missioner Alfred E, DriscoU, State Director of New 
Jersey's alcoholic beverage control department, and na- 
tionally known authority on control problems. Commis- 
sioner Driscoll has just completed a visit in Northern Cali- 
fornia, where he spoke before a group of law enforcement 
agencies at the State Building in San Francisco. 

During his stay in this area, Commissioner Driscoll told 
the enforcement officers he found conditions in the field of 
alcoholic beverage control here in excellent shape, and 
comparable with the best in the nation. He paid personal 
tribute to George R. Reilly, member of the State Board of 
Equali:;ation for this district, for his eiforts in helping to 
establish an "outstanding program of alcoholic beverage 
control" in the San Francisco area. 

Commissioner Driscoll said California is far ahead of 
other states in two important phases of control program — 
the curfew law and the handling of minors. The New 
Jersey liquor czar said California pioneered the curfew 
law, so that when it became national in scope this state was 
spared the confusion and ineffectiveness apparent in some 
other state. 

"I am convinced," Commissioner Driscoll said, "that 
we might have had far more strict regulation of the indus- 
try had not California pioneered with early closing 
measures. Had other states adopted the same policy when 
California did, there would not have been the problem of 
making the curfew effective when it became national in 
scope. 

"This state's handling of the minor problem also has 
been outstanding, and in looking over your records I find 
your intelligent handling of the issue has produced spec- 
tacular results. During my stay in this area I have made a 
survey of conditions, and in my travels throughout the 
nation I have found California far ahead of many states 
in its control program. I am familiar with the work done 
here by your board member, George Reilly, and he is to 
be congratulated upon the success he has achieved in the 
field of control on behalf of the public and the industry 
itself." 



Phone San Carlos 268 

SAN CARLOS PET 

HOSPITAL 

* 

SHIRLEY MARILYN SJARRING, D. V. M. 

• 
718 El Camino Real San Carlos, Calif. 



PENINSULA GARAGES 

R. H. Ratliff 
REDWOOD CITY, CALIF. 



No. 1— No. 2— 

450 Main Street 3101 El Camino Real 
Phone 3220 Night Phone 1214 Phone 3428 



Phone 3-9819 

NEW DEAL CIVIC 
CLUB INC. 

One of the Largest Dance Halls 
in the Country 

50 NORTH B STREET 
SAN MATEO CALIFORNIA 



Courtesy of 

INDUSTRIAL AND 
COMMERCIAL 
ELECTRONICS 

BELMONT, CALIFORNIA 



Phone San Carlos 555 


BAYSIDE OIL 


CORPORATION 


BRANSTEN ROAD 


SAN CARLOS CALIFORNIA 



Page 48 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



June, 194S 



Phone HEmlock 1480 



E. E. Brodhead 



W. S. WETENHALL CO. 

REINFORCING STEEL BARS 
Blaw-Knox Steel Floor Grating 

Office and Warehouse: 

17th AND WISCONSIN STREETS 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone OLympic 7530 

STUDEBAKER DEALER FOR ALAMEDA COUNTY 

MURPHY MOTOR 
COMPANY 

GERALD J. MURPHY, Owner 

3737 BROADWAY 
OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone Lowerlake 4Y3 

Enjoy Our 

CHICKEN DINNERS 

Dine and Dance Overlooking 

the Lake, and Enjoy Jim & 

Joe's Hospitality 

Swimming, Boating, Fishing and Cottages 
Box 266 

Clearlake Highlands 



Phone 6Y13 for Reservations 

THE LODGE 

"The Lodge of a Thousand Lights" 
Italian Dinners Famous from Coast to Coast 

Imported and Domestic Liquors 

CABINS - BOATING - FISHING 

Clearlake Highlands 

LAKE COUNTY 



Phone Richmond 3297 

BUCKHORN 
CAFE-TAVERN 

2233 MACDONALD AVENUE 
RICHMOND, CALIF. 



Phone Richmond 3301 

A. WINTERS 
Florist 

New Location - New Management 
BOB BOLES - MARVIN SHUPE 

1316 MACDONALD AVENUE 
RICHMOND, CALIF. 

We Telegraph Flowers Anywhere 



ANDY ANDERSEN'S 

CLEANATORIUM 
CLEANERS 

PRESSING WHILE YOU WAIT 
318 Sixth Street Richmond, Calif. 



Phone Richmond 3058 



L. Gardella, Prop. 



A MATHEWS G 

ARC WELDING GAS 

C WORKS S 

WELDING AND FABRICATING OF ALL KINDS 

ALUMINUM, BRAZING, CAST IRON, POT METAL 

STEEL AND ALL ALLOYS 

STUART WELDING SUPPLIES AND EQUIPMENT 

1527 Barrett Ave. Richmond, Calif. 



June, J945- 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 49 



NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY 
TRAFFIC GRADUATES 

Twenty-six police officers, including one from China, 
on June 13, were graduated from the Northwestern Uni- 
versity Traffic Institute's four-and-a-half-month course in 
traffic police administration in Evanston, Illinois. The 
class, representing the police departments of sixteen cities, 
six states and one county in the United States, and that of 
Chungking, China, received their diplomas at the 87th 
annual commencement exercises of Northwestern Uni- 
versity, when more than a thousand candidates for degrees 
and certificates from the University's schools and associated 
institutions assembled for the ceremonies at Deering 
Meadow. Robert E. Raleigh, acting director of the Insti- 
tute, delivered the formal charge to the graduates and 
presented the diplomas. 

This class brings to 247 the number of officers who have 
been graduated from the traffic police administration course 
since the Institute was founded in 1936. 

Class members from municipal police departments are; 
Liuet. Leo. T. Callaghan, Buffalo, N. Y.; Det. Willard J. 
Carlson, Miami, Fla.; Ptlm. James W. Clabby, Bridgeport, 
Conn.; Ptlm. Thomas W. Davis, Winston-Salem, N. C; 
Ptlm, John J. Guidici, Oakland, Calif.; Sgt. R. Chester 
Hessinger, Dayton, Ohio; Patrol Sgt. William Huebner, 
Milwaukee; Capt. S. K. King, Stockton, Calif; Sgt. Wil- 
liam H. Kipp, Cincinnati, Ohio; Lieut. Floyd A. Kline, 
Anderson, Ind.; Lieut. Herbert J. McGuire, New Haven, 
Conn.; Ptlm. Arthur B. Philpott, San Jose, Calif.; Special 
Traffic Officer Walter S. Schearer, Reading, Pa.; Chief 
Collision Investigator Ted R. Smith, Pasadena, Calif.; 
Ptlm. Raymond B. Valentine, Lower Merion Township, 



NEWMAN TOOL & DIE WORKS 



1001 24th STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



LEO'S PLACE 

A GOOD SPOT TO MEET YOUR FRIENDS 
598 VALENCIA STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

NUSBAUM WHOLESALE HARDWARE CO. 



871 FOLSOM STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone DOuglas 891 I 

LA SALLE GARAGE 

H. O. LITTLE. Proprietor 
981 HOWARD STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone HEmlock 4292 



Jane and Lee 



JANEY MAE'S BEAUTY SALON 



502 14th STREET, near Guerrero Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Frank C. Borrmann Steel Supply Co. 



815 BRYANT STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone Mission 8322 



Geo. A. Favre 



POTRERO TIRE SERVICE 

New and Used Tires and Tubes - Full Circle Recapping 

2720 23rd STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Ardmore, Pa.; and Sgt. Arthur P. Williams, San Francisco. 
The 194i fall course in traffic police administration will 
start September 10. The deadline for applications for this 
course is June 20. 











Home Loans for War Veterans 

The San Francisco Bank extends a cordial 
invitation to all War Veterans seeking 
home loans to drop into any one of its 
seven offices. We shall be glad to advise 
Veterans how to secure a 

GUARANTEED HOME LOAN 
under the Service Men's Bill of Rights. 

• 

IHE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

SA VINGS Inc. Feb. 10, 1868 ■ Mcmbtr Ftderal Dtpmt Ins. Corp. TR UST 

526 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 

SEVEN OFFICES— EACH A COMPLETE BANK 


' 









Page 50 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



June, 194S 



EIGHT ACE DETECTIVES HERE 
FOR BIG MEET 

(Continued from jpage 4) 
Springs, Ark., and Los Angeles arrived a week before 
the opening of the International Security Conference, and 
were sworn in as temporary members of the San Fran- 
cisco Police Department by Chief Charles W. Dullea. 
They served throughout the Conference. 
The eight men are : 

Lieutenant Daniel J. Campion and Detective Joseph 
Sullivan of the Pickpocket and Bunco Bureau of New 
York City: Inspector Jerr>' Watson of Hot Springs; In- 
spectors Edward Witr>' and Timothy O'Connell of the 
Pickpocket Bureau of Chicago, and Inspector Frank Keo- 
hane of the Robbery Detail, and Victor Penny of the 
Pickpocket Detail, Los Angeles, and Captain J. J. Grosch 
of New Orleans. 

All these men are specialists in their particular line 
of work and the word that they were going to be in San 
Francisco for the duration of the conference was calcu- 
lated to keep any bright guns from other states from con- 
verging on this city. 

They were assigned to Lieutenant Charles Maher of 
the Pickpocket and Bunco Detail and were scattered 
among the big hotels housing delegates and their aides. 

Inspector Keohane is a brother of Inspector John 
Keohane of the Check Detail under Lieutenant Maurice 
Riordan. He is rated one of the best men in the Inspec- 
tor's Bureau of our southern sister city. 
( Contijiued on piige ^2 ) 



BARTENDERS AND 
CULINARY WORKERS 

UNION No. 595 

• 

MAKE IT THREE OUT 

* 

BUY MORE 
WAR BONDS 

And Help Finish Off the Japs 

* 

607 MACDONALD AVENUE 
RICHMOND, CALIF. 



Phone South San Francisco 57 
R. D. Rasmussen, Operator E. O. Eckert, Mgr. 

Skyway Cafe 



BAR - COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

FINE FOODS 

• 

San Francisco 
Municipal Airport 

• 

COFFEE SHOP OPEN 24 HRS. 

Except Sundays - 8 A.M. to 4 P.M. 



i 

4 



S. W. Gann C. W. Gann R. G. Gann 
Phone KElIog 2-1042 

Gann Products Co. 

Established 1933 



Manufacturers - Packers 
Distributors 

FOOD PRODUCTS 
in Cellophane 

• * 

1240 EAST 14th STREET 
OAKLAND, CALIF. 



June. 1945 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 51 



Phone Belmont 794 

BOOTS & SADDLE 
Range Riders' Bar 

1428 EL CAMINO REAL 
* 

Phone 5-9944 

BOOTS & SADDLE 
LODGE 

COTTAGES and COCKTAILS 



LA HONDA 



CALIFORNIA 



Where there's fun for one there's 
FUN FOR ALL 



Compliments 

PA1\AMA1^IA1V 
DELEGATIOIV 

U. N. C. 1. O. 

COIVFEREIVCE 

SAN FRAIVCISCO 




Phones: R. C. 409-3 148 R. J. L. Currie 

CURRIE 

Manufacturing 

Company 

LINOLEUM 
AWNINGS 
SHADES 
VENETIAN BLINDS 
RUGS 
CARPETS 
DRAPERIES 
FURNITURE 

2408 EL CAMINO REAL 
REDWOOD CITY CALIFORNIA 



You and Your Friends Are Cordially 
Invited to The 

3 *** 

DINE AND DANCE 

Famous Chicken, Spaghetti and 
Steak Dinners 



298 EL CAMINO REAL 
MILLBRAE CALIFORNIA 

Phone Millbrae 2702 



Page 52 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



June, 194S 



ACE DETECTIVES HERE FOR MEET 

(Continued from page 50) 

On April 27, a dinner was held for the visiting eastern 
sleuths at Bimbo's Restaurant, Bay and Powell Streets. 

It was a feast properly sprinkled with the necessary 
liquid refreshments. 

Inspector George Page and Fred Butz had charge of the 
affair and they made it one the guests of honor will be 
talking about for a long, long time to come. 

Many members of the San Francisco Police Department 
were present and, in a foreword to the menu, Inspectors 
Page and Butz stated: 

"It isn't often that we police officers of San Francisco 
have the opportunity to greet brothers from other cities. 
But now we have that opportunity. It took a world up- 
heaval to bring us together and so we have a Champion, 
without the H. A. Sullivan — not John L., but one of the 
finest from New York City; Tim O'Connell and Ed 
Witrey, two fine gents if we ever spotted one; from Los 
Angeles Frank Keohane returns to this city, his old home 
town, with Vic Penny, a one-time ball player; from "Way 
Down South," New Orleans sends us John Grosch; from 
Arkansas, which has given the world Bob Burns as a one- 
man band, comes Jerry Watkins, a one-man police de- 
partment. We local "Cops" who have had the pleasure of 
meeting and to know and be with this "foreign element" 
are happy that, although it has taken strife and care to 
bring these great guys here, we are able to greet them as 
true and tried friends. May we meet again soon, when the 
troubles of this world have subsided and joy again reigns." 



Phone KLondike 2-0644 



The Alfred Hart 

Distributing 

Company 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 

Wholesale Liquor Dealer 



598 POTRERO AVENUE 
SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



The Seventh War 

Loan Drive 
Needs Your Help 

The Seventh War Loan Drive now 
in under way and the help of every 
American with an income is needed 
to make the Drive a success. The 
money from War Bond sales is neces- 
sary to carry on the war. It is helping 
pay for the planes, tanks, ships, am- 
munition and medical and hospital 
facilities for our fighting men. 

Collapse of the Nazi gangsters 
must not let us forget for an instant 
that there still remains a vicious and 
fanatical enemy in Asia to be con- 
quered. Our military leaders warn us 
that the war against Japan will be long 
and hard and that many billions of dol- 
lars will be needed before final victory. 

Your investment in war bonds serves 
a dual purpose. First, it pays rich divi- 
dends in the self-satisfaction of knowing 
that your money is helping to bring vic- 
tory a little closer. And, second, your 
savings in bonds will provide a postwar 
nestegg . . for the youngsters' ed- 
ucation . . for the new home or 
farm . . for a little business for the 
returning veteran or yourself 
and will provide against sickness or ac- 
cident. 

Remember the War is not over — 
BUY BONDS! 



Pacific Gas and ElectricGompany 

PJ 6X-645 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



TODD'S CLUB 

COCKTAILS 

. . . and . . . 

DANCING 




2068 San Pablo Avenue 
El Cerrito, Calif. 



Couipliitients of 



CALIFORNIA 

SPRAY CHEMICAL 

CORPORATION 




RICHMOND 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone Richmond 1411 

Richmond 
Produce Company 

Incorporated 

Commission Merchants 
Wholesale Fruit, Produce 



394 17th Street 
Richmond California 



CHICO 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Johnson 
Truck Lines 

Main Office 
RICHMOND, CALIFORNIA 



From: 

SAN FRANCISCO and EAST BAY POINTS, 

call ENterprise 10623 
From OTHER POINTS, call Richmond 3011 



See 


. 562, P. L. & R. 


U 


S. POSTAGE 




PAID 


San 


Francisco, Calif. 




Permit 3172 



Stohl, Nels S 

270 Claremont Blvd 
San Francisco, Cal 



-I 




^ 
•I 
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•I 

^ 

A 

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+ 
* 
* 
4 
4 
■* 
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4 
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41 



Compliments to Police and Peace Officers 
of San Mateo County 

STOP IN AT 

The 101 Club 

DANCING 8:00 P. M. TO 12:00 MIDNIGHT 
LUNCH 12:00 NOON TO 2:00 P. M. 
DINNER 5:00 P. M. TO 9:00 P. M. 



BUS STOP 

28TH AVENUE AND EL CAMINO REAL, 

SAN MATEO 
PHONE 5-9944 

CLARENCE BURNETT, Proprietor 



BURNETT'S BI-RITE 


SAN MATEO 


LIQUORS COMPANY 


CUT RATE LIQUORS 


Third and Ellsworth 


262 B Street 


San Mateo 


San Mateo 


Phone 3-9765 


Phone 3-4037 



CLARENCE BURNETT, Proprietor 



f■^.^^^^^^^^^^^^^Y^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^'^^^^^i■Y^^^^^•^^T^^^^^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^■^^^^^^^•^*'^^^^^^^t^^•^'^^■^*^^^TTTT^^TTTTTTTTTTTTT^•TTTT 



i 




AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 

OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA 





CAPTAIN MICHAEL GAFFEY 
New Police Commission Secretary 



AUGUST 1945 



AN OFFICIAL PUBLIC 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



MOLKENBUHR BROS. 

"REPUTATION EARNED" 





Seamon Molkenbuhr 



Val Molkenbuhr 



Distributors 

LENOX HALL JEWELRY 

Biltmore Luggage 
Entire Third Floor 

23 GRANT AVENUE 

Opposite Magnin's 



Phone VAlencia 8223 

Brooks 

Equipment 

Co. 

Pacific Coast Distributors: 

Consolidated Ball Tooth 

Universal Joints 

La Bour Pumps 
Thomas Power Couplings 

636 POTRERO AVENUE 
SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



HEmlock 9624 — Day or Night 

G. W. Thomas 
Drayage & Rigging Co. 

Incorporated 

GENERAL DRAYING 

SAFE AND MACHINERY 

MOVING 

LONG DISTANCE HAULING 

RIGGING 

114 FOURTEENTH STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 





Marine Diesel Engines 




Stationary Diesel Engines 




L O R 1 M E R 


D 


lESEL ENGINE 




COMPANY 




Sixteenth and Wood Streets 




Oakland 7, California 



August, 194 S 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page I 



Featured in This Issue 



Page 



San Francisco Police Click During UNCIO 



The Friday Holdup Man 

By Sergeant Harry Majors 6 

Finger Records in The Bible 

By B. C. Bridges 8 



Bay Counties' Peace Officers' Association . . 10 

FBI Police Academy Graduates Bay Officers . 1 1 

Captain Charles F. Skelly Dies 12 

Inspector William McMahon 13 

Captain Michael GafFey, New Secretary 

of San Francisco Police Commission . . 14 

Coast Guard Celebrates 155th Birthday . . H 

Some are "True" and Some are "False" 

— Rate Yourself 16 

Sheriff Broaddus of Mendocino County ... 17 

Praise Letters to Chief Dullea 18 

Editorial Page 20 



Northern California Police Communication 
Officers' Association 



21 



1908 Police Class Hold Banquet 30 

Identification Officers Meet 32 

Frank Lynch, Veteran Police Officer, 

In Bail Bond Business 40 



Pete Maloney Now Funeral Director . . . 



41 



Edward J. Wheeler 20 Years San Carlos 

Chief of Police 42 

Second Harrington Son Cited 43 

W. P. Wobber 111 . 45 

Annual Transfer of Captains 46 

Officer George Hagerman, Jr., Cited by General 48 

Willetts Chief of Police 50 



Directory 



The Editor is always pleased to consider articles suitable for publication. 
Contributions should preferably be typewritten, but where this is not pos- 
sible, copy should be clearly written. Contributions may be signed with a 
"nom de plume," but all articles must bear the name and address of the 
sender, which will be treated with the strictest confidence. The Editor 
will also be pleased to consider photographs of officers and of interesting 
^ents. Letters should be addressed to the Editor. 



SAN FRANCISCO POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Hail of Justice, Kearny and Washington Streets 
Telephones SUtter 2020 - 2030 
Radio Short Wave Call KGPD 



Mayor, Hon. Roger D. Lapham 



BOARD OF POLICE COMMISSIONERS 

Regular Meedngs, Monday, 8:00 p. m Hall of Justice 

Hon. Jerd Sullivan, President Crocker First Nat'l Bank 

Hon. John Wesley Howell 240 Battery Street 

Hon. E. L. Turkington Furniture Mart Bldg. 

Captain, Michael GafFey, Secretary; 
Room 104, Hall of Justice 



CHIEF OF POLICE Charles W. Dullea 

DEPUTY CHIEF OF POLICE Michael Riordan 

Dept. Sec'y Capt. John A. Engler Hall of Justice 

District Captains 

Central Joseph Walsh 63 5 Washington Street 

Southern Al, O'Brien Fourth and Clara Streets 

Mission Alexander McDaniel 3057 17th Street 

Northern John M. Sullivan 743 Ellis Street 

G. G. Park John A. Reed Stanyan opp. Waller 

Richmond F. J. McGuire 451 Sixth Ave. 

Ingleside....Al. Christiansen.. ..Balboa Pk., nr. San Jose Ave. 

Taraval John J. Wade 2348 24th Avenue 

Potrero Leo J. Tackney 2300 Third Street 

Headquarters Patrick J. Murr.w Hall of Justice 

Traffic Bureau M, E. Mitchell 63 5 Washington St. 

Bur. Inspectors B. J. McDonald Hall of Justice 

Supervising Captain of Districts..M. GAFFEY..Hall of Justice 

Director 

Bureau of Personnel James L, English Hall of Justice 

Director - Bureau of 

Special Services.. ..Insp. Percy H. KENEALLY....Hall of Justice 

Director of 

Juvenile Bureau Geo. M. Healy 2745 Greenwich St. 

Director - Bureau of Criminal 

Information George Hippely Hall of Justice 

Property Clerk Patrick J. Murray Hall of Justice 

Insp. of Schools Traffic Control.. ..Insp. Byron Getchell 
Big Brother Bureau Lieut. Harry Reilly 



WKen In Trotibie Call SUtter 20-20 

W iXCXl IXl L/OXiut Always At Your Service 



Page 2 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



August, 1945' 



HEmlock 7283 



Peter Maloney 

"Pete" 

Past President 

Police Widows' and Orphans 

Aid Association 



Now Associated With 

BARRY & McDonald 



Funeral Directors 



766 Valencia St. 



San Francisco 



EMERSON-NEWBERY 
COMPANY. INC. 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

and 

CONTRACTING 

ALSO MARINE WIRING 

55 New Montgomery St., San Francisco 

New York, Los Angeles 
Chicago, New Jersey 



HINCHMAN-ROLPH 
& LANDIS 



IN ASSOCIATION WITH 



CHAPMAN & CO. 



Supervising General Agents 
Insurance 



345 SANSOME STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Compliments to 



San Francisco Police Department 



VENUS CLUB 

DINING AND DANCING 
5 P. M. to 12 M. 

303 THIRD STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



! San Francisco 



"Efficient Police 

Make a City of 

Peace" 

I Established 1922) 




A Police News 

and Educational 

Magazine 

(Trade Maik Copyright) 



Vol. XXII 



AUGUST, 1945 



No. 2 



S. F. Police Click During UNCIO 



The United Nations Conference is a thing of the past, 
but its results will long be remembered, and the part that 
San Francisco Police Department played in this meeting of 
representatives of more than fifty Nations throughout the 
world will ever be a shining page in the history of this city. 

Throughout the conference the measures prepared long 



Chief Charles W. Dullea, working with the heads of our 
armed forces, the United States Secret Service and other 
governmental agencies having to do with the protection 
of our President, gave an example of police understanding 
that justifies his reputation as being one of the best Chiefs 
of Police this or any other city has ever had. 






Deputy Chief Michael Riordan 



Chief Charles W. Dullea 



Captain John Engler 



These Planned the Police Program jor United 'Hations Conference 



before the delegates arrived in April were put into effect 
and gave the utmost in safeguarding the men and women 
gathered here to prepare for the future peace of the earth. 
Not one serious crime was committed during the period the 
meeting was in progress. Not one case of a pocket being 
picked was reported to the police, and one knows that the 
first thing a man or woman does when he or she finds their 
purse taken from their person is to let the police depart- 
ment know about it. 

Not one untoward act was committed to disturb the 
peace of the people of this city which during the Confer- 
ence totaled close to a million people. 

This great record of crime prevention was climaxed 
by the arrival of President Truman to close the sessions. 



Aided by his key position men, such as Deputy Chief 
Michael Riordan, Captain John Engler, Captain of In- 
spectors Bernard McDonald, Captains Michael Mitchell, 
Michael Gaifey, Arthur Christiansen, Aloysius O'Brien, 
Alexander McDaniell, the late Charles F. Skelly, and 
Lieutenant Nels Stothe, President Truman was brought 
into the city from Hamilton Field, over a line of march 
that took the ofiicial procession through the streets of the 
downtown district, thence to the Fairmont Hotel which 
was the President's official headquarters. An estimated half- 
million people lined the streets to see our new Chief Execu- 
tive. Every cross street was covered by a foot patrolman, 
a motorcycle officer or men in squad cars, and so well was 
the parade planned that not a hitch occurred to delay in 



Page 4 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



August, 194) 



the least way the progress of the many automobile loads 
that followed the Presidential car. 

Forty motorcycles from the San Francisco Police De- 
partment acted as an honor guard. 

At the hotel a competent detail of experienced officers 
was on hand to see that the President could enter his 
quarters unimpeded. Further arrangements were made to 



He expressed his admiration for the San Francisco 
Police Department on his arrival at the Fairmont Hotel, 
where the Chief and his leading officers were gathered 
to see that every detail of their plans were carried out. 
On this occasion he addressed the Chief, Deputy Chief, the 
Captains and other officers present to the effect that he 
has seen many occasions where the police departments 




Captain of In,spf,ctors B. J. McDonald Captain Arthur Christiansen 



Captain Aloysius O'Brien 





Captain Alexander McDaniel ■ Captain M. E. I. Mitchell 

These Captains Did an Excellent Job of Policing President's Parade 



accompany him to the Municipal Opera House on the oc- 
casion of his attendance at the closing sessions of the 
Conference and the signing of the charter adopted hy the 
members of the Conference. 

On his departure from the city, President Truman was 
given a motorcycle escort to Hamilton Field and so pleased 
was he with the care and attention that went into the 
preparations for his visit, that he paused and shook hands 
with every officer, city and state, who made the trip. 



were put on their mettle to see that distinguished visitors 
in their midst were given every protection, "But what I 
have seen today excels anything I have ever seen before, 
and I know whereof I speak, for I have seen many demon- 
strations." 

Chief Dullea was highly pleased with the manner every 
man of the Department detailed to do his part in this great 
event, acted. He said after the arrival of the President he 
would like to shake the hand of every member who con- 



August, 1945 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page J 



trihuted so well to the smooth operation of the parade. 

Lieutenant Charles Maher and his Bunco and Pickpocket 
Detail consisting of Inspectors Harry Cook, Thomas Regan, 
Morris Harris, Charles Iredale, Louis Linses and Michael 
Chrystal sure kept the light-fingered boys from operating 
here. 

No single other member of the force was charged with 
as much responsibility as was Inspector Fred Bohr of the 
Hotel Detail, and the way he and his regular force con- 
sisting of William Hansen and George Wall and aug- 
mented by dozens of experienced members of the Bureau 
of Inspectors, looked after the care of the delegates as- 
signed to the leading hotels of this city was a swell job 
well done. 

Many letters have been received by Chief Dullea and 
we present a few of them extolling the Police Department 
for the great job it did in every phase of this, the greatest 
gathering of international delegates ending with the ar- 
rival of the man who leads the nation : 

Here are a few of the letters : 
From State Department . . . 

"I want to express my appreciation to you for all that 
you have done for us during the Conference. Your police 
force has done itself proud in the handling of many diffi- 
cult security problems in and around the Civic Center. 
I know of no instance in which any of your men were 
officious or peremptory, and apparently they always han- 
dled themselves with the good nature, tact and courtesy 
which seems to characterize the San Francisco Police. Our 
days in San Francisco have been very pleasant, and it has 
been a great pleasure working with you. I hope that when 
you are in Washington, you will give me a ring in the 
State Department as it would be nice to see you again. 
With best wishes, 

WiLLMM D. Wright, 

Administrative Secretary, 

United Nations Conference on International 

Organization. S. F. Opera House." 

Official Agent N. J. L. Pieper of FBI . . . 

"I want to take this occasion to thank you and the 
members of your force for the very fine assistance given 
us in connection with our responsibilities in the United 
Nations Conference. 

"Prior to the Conference and during the many weeks 
of the Conference, your representatives were most help- 
ful, and I do appreciate this fine co-operation. 
"Thank you for all you did. 

N. J. L. Pieper, 
Special Agent in Charge, 
Federal Bureau of Investigation, 
United States Dept. of Justice." 
* * * 

From Mayor Lapham . . . 

"The United Nations Conference on International Or- 
ganization has come and gone. Their nine weeks' stay 
with us put a heavy burden on the City and on its various 



departments; but the heaviest burden of all was put on 
the department you command. The problem of security is 
difficult enough when confined to ordinary City activities, 
but to impose on that the burden of security affecting 
leading representatives of fifty nations, is indeed another 




Mayor Roger D. Lapham 

matter. May I express to you, as Mayor, on behalf of all 
the citizens of San Francisco, our deep gratitude and 
appreciation for the way the officers and men of your de- 
partment conducted themselves. You had a job to do and 
you did it without fuss or feathers. I know our many 
visitors left San Francisco with the warmest feeling toward 
the City and many expressed to me their admiration of 
the efficiency and courtesy of the Police Departmeent. My 
heartfelt thanks to you — which please convey to all in 
your command. 

Roger D. L.aph.^m, Mayor, 

City and County of San Francisco." 

"I am attaching herewith a copy of a letter received 
from Lord Halifax, expressing appreciation for the many 
kindnesses extended to the members of the United King- 
dom Delegation during their stay at the United Nations 
Conference, and paying special tribute to the Police De- 
partment. Everyone appreciates a pat on the back, so I 
know you will be pleased to read this letter. 

Roger D. Lapuau, 
Mayor of San Frandsco" 

Letter from Lord Halifax . . . 

"I cannot leave San Francisco without expressing to you 
once more the gratitude which all the members of the 
United Kingdom Delegation feel to you and to the people 
of San Francisco for the great kindness and hospitality 
that has been shown to us while we were here. We shall 
( Continued on Page 34) 



Page 6 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 

The Friday Holdup Men 

By Sergeant H-ARRY J. Majors, Robbery Detail, San Francisco Police Department 



August, 1945 



It was the winter of 1943-1944 and the San Francisco 
Pohce Department was busily engaged in handling an in- 
crease of robberies. The Robbery Chart of the department 
invariably reaches its peak during the winter months and 
then drops to a lower level during the summer months. 
However, with the war situation at its peak and with an 
influx of every type of person from all over the United 
States in our city — the crime of robbery hit an all-time 
high. Naturally, Chief Dullea had all the members of his 
command instructed to be especially on the alert, and 
particularly during the early morning hours to stop and 
check all suspicious persons that may be seen roaming the 
streets at late and unusual hours. Radio patrol cars in 





decided to drive up and interview the man headed toward 
Page Street as he appeared to be in a hurry to get out 
of the vicinity. Meantime, the man in front of 100 Brod- 
erick Street walked south to Haight Street thence east on 
Haight. As they drove up alongside the man at Page and 




Sergeant Harry Majors 



Floyd Richardson 

Paroled in 1943 from Washington State Penitentiary. Old Time 
San Francisco holdup man and pal of Fowler. 



Broderick, Officer Driscoll being closer to him on his side 
of the car casually asked: "Where are you going?" Little 
did the officers suspect at the time that they were about 
due for one of the most hair-raising experiences of their 
lives. About the time Officer Driscoll finished his ques- 



every district were doing a splendid job of rounding up 
suspicious persons found at unusual locations at late hours, 
and many suspects and ex-convicts were picked up and 
held for investigation. "Cons" as a rule dislike being stop- 
ped by police officers at any time for many reasons. Per- 
haps some may have violated their parole and know they 
are wanted for such parole violations or they may be 
escapees from some penitentiary or jail or road camp. 
Such men are dangerous when stopped by police, es- 
pecially when they are armed, as they know if they are 
caught with firearms in their possession — right back to 
"BIG HOUSE" they go. 

Radio Patrol Officers Raymond A. Bokelund and Larric 
Driscoll were on their regular midnight patrol in the 
Park Police District, and at about 3:30 a.m. FRIDAY, 
January 14, 1944, they were driving north on Broderick 
Street they observed a man standing in the doorway at 
100 Broderick Street — the entrance to a large apartment 
house. At about the same time they observed a man walk- 
ing north on Broderick Street toward Page Street. They 




Leigh Haskell Fowler 

Escaped from Washington State Penitentiary in 1943 about the 
time his pal Floyd Richardson was paroled. 



August, 1945 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 7 



tion, the man whipped out a .45 automatic from his over- 
coat pocket and pointed it at DriscoU's head, and in a 
cool, but determined manner, he said: "If either of you 
make a false move Til let you have it." With that he 
opened the back door of the radio car and climbed into 
the back seat and placing his .45 to the back of DriscolFs 
head ordered the officers to turn around and drive over 
to Haight Street and pick up his friend. The officers sensed 
they had a real dangerous holdup man in the back seat of 
their car, and they weren't anxious to have another one. 
Officer Bokelund, with quick presence of mind told the 
holdup man that they thought his friend had turned west 
on Haight Street, so the bandit said: "All right, turn that 
way and pick up my friend and then we will give you boys 
a real time," After going a short distance on Haight the 
bandit found out he had been misdirected and he ordered 
the officers to make a U-turn and go back east on Haight 
Street, However, by this time the bandit's friend had 
disappeared. 

Now, he really got tough with the boys and ordered 
both of them to turn over their "heaters." By this time 
they were driving on the border of Golden Gate Park 
near Stanyan, First he frisked Officer Driscoll and got his 
gun out of his holster. During this short moment Officer 
Bokelund's quick thinking again frustrated the bandit. 
Bokelund managed to quickly slip his gun out of the 
holster and drop it to the floor of the car. When he 
searched Bokelund he found no gun and asked: "How 
come?" Bokelund said that it was only a traffic car and 
they only carried one gun between them. This apparently 
satisfied the bandit and he ordered them to drive on out 
Lincoln Way. Unfortunately at this late hour of the night 
on a cold January morning virtually no one was out that 
they might attract the attention of, or that might afford 
them an opportunity to get out of this embarrassing and 
tight situation. 

When nearing Second Avenue near Golden Gate Park 
the bandit observed the park through the mist and ordered 
Bokelund to stop the car. The bandit opened the back door 
and ordered Driscoll to come out with his hands up. Dris- 
coll, unarmed, got out as ordered and then Officer Boke- 
lund's quick thinking again saved the day — he asked the 
bandit if he could lower his hands to put on the emergency 
brake and the bandit agreed. He put on the brake and at 
the same time grabbed his gun and then as he got out of 
the car he took a hurried shot at the gunman. The gun- 
man's body was partially shielded by the open door and the 
bullet just knicked the metal window moulding of the car 
and saved the bandit from receiving a mortal wound. The 
bandit then returned the fire — things were in confusion; 
Driscoll was a non-entity without his gun, as the bandit 
and Bokelund engaged in the gun duel. Bokelund backed 
down the street, firing as he went, and got to the safety 
of a trolley pole. Meanwhile the bandit emptied his .45 
automatic and then used Officer DriscoU's gun in firing 
while he made his escape into the darkness of Golden 
Gate Park, Officer Bokelund then immediately got into his 
bullet-ridden radio car and called communications for 
assistance. When more officers arrived they made an ex- 



tensive search of the park but their quarry had vanished. 
Officer Bokelund gave a description of the suspect and 
the main thing he observed about the bandit was that he 
had "very piercing eyes," and that he would never forget 
that face again. The only injuries received in the gun duel 
were suffered by the Police Department automobile. 

Now we knew we had a real tough outlaw to deal with, 
and only a fair description. The accomplice who walked 
away in the other direction when the police arrived we 
had no description of whatsoever. A very meager source 
of information for the Robbery Detail to work on. Two 




Police car hit by bandit's bullets. Left, Officer Raymond A. 
Bokelund; right, Officer Lame Driscoll 

weeks later — Friday, January 28th, 1944, Mike Sutter, a 
groceryman, was opening his place of business at about 
7:50 a.m. at 300 Turk Street. Two men were standing at 
his doorway waiting for him to open up. He thought he 
had a couple of customers. But when these men whipped 
out ,45 automatics and told him to hurry up and open 
up the store and let them in he was taken by surprise. 
They immediately bound and gagged the victim after they 
got into the store. Just about this time, Mike Sutter's 
brother came into the store and one of the bandits pointed 
his gun at him, Gus Sutter was somewhat belligerent and 
grabbed the bandit's gun and in the ensuing struggle the 
second bandit struck Gus over the head with a blackjack, 
and the bandit's gun was discharged and the bullet pene- 
trated a can of pineapple juice on the shelf. The bandits 
then scooped the money from the cash register and frisked 
the victims and left with $475,00 in cash. In the struggle 
the bandits lost their hats. All the hats could show was 
that they were bought in stores in Tacoma and Seattle, 
Washington, 

Friday seemed to be an auspicious day for these bandits 
to carry on their work. The next inkling we had of this 
pair being at work again was on Good Friday, April 7, 
1944, when they held up Andrew Marty and his daughter 
in the White House Cleaners and Dyers at 174 14th Street, 
where they entered the premises with drawn automatics 
and ordered the proprietor and his young and beautiful 
daughter to lie on the floor, then they bound and gagged 
(Continued on Page 48) 



Page 8 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



August, 1945 



Finger Records in Bible History 

By B. C. Bridges, Superintendent, Bureau of Identification, Alameda Police Department 



The author of the accompanying article, which was 
written for the San Francisco Police Journal, is an inter- 
nationally recognized expert in identification. He is the 
author of the book, "Practical Fingerprinting," one of the 
most complete authoritative and up-to-date works on fin- 
gerprinting, published by Funk and Wagnalls Co., New 
York. 



(All rights reserved bv the author) 
Colorful and ever-new are the centuries-old themes 
of Scriptural lore. And amulets there are that still evoke 
those bright and mystic wonders of the past; the carven 
cartouche of a monarch's ring, some flagstones from a van- 
ished pagan temple, or thumb-marked shards of quaint, 
long-shattered pottery. They part the silent tapestries of 
time to reveal the light and animation of those ancient 




B. C. Bridges 

yesterdays. Palace, dwelling, market-place, and thorough- 
fare are alive with populous sound and movement. Clat- 
tering donkey feet bicker upon the smooth-worn roadways 
together with shuffling camel-pads. Vendors cry their 
wares; lightsome talk and laughter ripple from balcony 
and shaded garden. 

Within the broad and open courtyard of his home, a 
wealthy merchant displays his costly stock of rugs and 
vases. A splashing fountain dances near at hand, and slaves 
with food prepare his table for a meal. Dishes of silver 
gleam beside Egyptian glassware and painted jugs from 
Crete. 

In the adjacent kitchen, menials are busy at their char- 
coal ovens with their utensils of cookery, pots of brown 
and yellow clay, some glazed and decorated, water pitchers, 
and jars filled with oil, vinegar, and wine. 



A portly chef is discoursing patronizingly with his 
underling; "Behold this jar with the potter's own thumb- 
print upon its handle. My father's father was yet a strip- 
ling who fled for his life to the desert, with this very jar 
filled with water, when the city was taken. Well do I 
remember his tale of how he dwelt amid the wastelands 
with kindly herdsmen, while the soldiers cast down the 
king's palace, and all dwellings so that no stone rested 
upon another. They plowed the broken soil and scattered 
it with salt so that nothing there might grow. And all 
were slain ... all save my father's father." 

The truth of that old jar's dim history none now may 
know. And yet there still endures the thumb-print of a 
lowly potter, who placed his token there so long ago; and 
in its silent symbol, which has weathered the ravaging 
of time and conquest, is recognized the tacit and abiding 
dominance of the hand of man, that marks his work and 
shapes his destiny. 

One of the outstanding happenings in Bible chronicle 
deals with Queen Jezebel; and although terminating in 
sanguinary disaster, her vivid history adds yet another 
episode to the romantic annals of hands and fingerprints. 
As the wife and queen of King Ahab of Israel, she has 
frequently been depicted as an arch-type of malevolence. 
However it must be remembered that this version is large- 
ly dependent upon her story as related in the Second Book 
of Kings by her bitterest enemies. The relentless severity 
inherent in those narrators of Old Palestine, and especially 
when dealing with a rival faith, would hardly have tem- 
pered the tale with tolerance. 

In the light of impartial judgment, Jezebel deserves some 
concession, if for no other reason than for acting in con- 
sonance with her own beliefs and convictions. 

Her reign saw parlous times in Palestine; rulers sat 
their thrones precariously. Israel and Judah had separated 
as independent kingdoms, and their assailable isolation 
invited pillage. The Egyptians had invaded Judah, and 
King Ahab feared for his people. 

Resorting to precedent established by countless monarchs 
ere his time, he took in marriage a princess from among 
his traditional enemies, thinking to promote an alliance of, 
at least, neutrality. His choice of spouse allowed no half- 
way measures. Jezebel was young and she was beautiful, 
with enterprise reflecting impulse and high spirit. Not 
only was her father a priest of Astarte, then foremost of 
all pagan dieties, but also he was king of Sidom and Tyre, 
while her father's father was King Hiram, an equal with 
King Solomon, and co-builder of the famous temple. 

She was conscious of her aristocracy, and with reason. 
Jezebel was the daughter of a nation far higher in the cul- 
tural scale than was the uncouth tribe of Ahab; and her 
lawful lord and master was originally only a soldier's son 
who ruled a small rebellious nation in which the prophet 



August, 1945 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 9 



Elijah held religious dominance. Her natal-place had been 
a royal court of bright and pagan luxury, the focal point 
of science and of art. Her marriage politic was beneath her 
class, a disparity so hard for indulged and haughty women 
to endure. 

Jezebel, high priest's daughter, schooled in the voluptu- 
ous worship of Astarte, kept faith with her father and her 
gods; and King Ahab succumbed to the influence of his 
fair wife . . . "It came to pass . . . that he took to wife 
Jesebel . . . and reared up an altar to Baal . . . and made 
a grove ..." His history reveals Ahab as irresolute in re- 
ligion. He tried to worship all the gods in turn, and still 
hold friendship with Elijah, who was warring on the 
priests of Baal, and succeeded in slaying nearly five hund- 
red before Queen Jezebel threatened punishment. Then it 
was that the prophet fled to the wilderness to be sustained 
by ravens. 

For a time, Ahab's efforts toward national harmony with 
his neighbors brought prosperity and traffic friendship. 
The seeming prudence of his foreign policies mollified 
even the voluble and pessimistic priests of Jehovah, chang- 
ing their ranting censures to praise and forecast for good 
fortune. But prosperity brought envy to his neighbors, who 
coveted his thriving kingdom. The Syrians, led by Ben- 
hadad, came with vast hosts under thirty-two kings, and 
issued an ultimatum; "Thou shalt deliver me thy gold 
and silver, and thy wives and children." 

Counselled by his advisers to defend his kingdom even 
against this powerful coalition of his enemies, Ahab went 
forth, was victorious in several major encounters, and took 
Benhadad captive. However, he dealt kindly with his royal 
prisoner, and at last released him, thus incurring bitter 
denunciation from the uncompromising prophets. 

Three years later, while at war with the Syrians, Ahab 
met his death, and, for fourteen years, Jezebel ruled as 
regent for her two sons. It also is highly probable that dur- 
ing the twenty-two years which she spent as Ahab's queen, 
her's was the "power behind the throne". 

Her reign was wise and prosperous, and the nation 
gained in both wealth and power. But peace grew monoto- 
nous to the radical and fiery prophets; Elisha, successor 
to Elijah, the Tishbite, fomented an uprising. To lead the 
attack, he chose Jehu, a captain of soldiers, and anointed 
him as king. The surprise offensive won through the city 
gates, and the rebels entered to pillage and slaughter until 
the streets flowed red. King Joram, the eldest son of Ahab, 
Jehu slew ruthlessly. 

In spite of the traitorous massacre of her subjects, and 
her son's death by the invaders, Jezebel remained undaunt- 
ed. Spurning personal safety in flight or concealment, she 
". . . painted her face and tiered her head . . .", then stood 
m an open window overlooking the roadway, and waited 
the newly-made king. Dispassionate analysis of her de- 
portment suggests a conclusion more salutory that the 
Old Testament version. No love had she for Jehu, who 
had lately butchered her kindred and her son, and yet 
she sought to win his favor. Here is left little room for 
motive other than self-abnegation, for probability sug- 
gests that Jezebel hoped to gain the goodwill of Jehu only 



that she might temper the wrath of his hand against her 
people. 

None now may know her true emotions, which were at 
best but brief, for there below the soldier sternly gazed, 
scorning her invitation, and ordered her "cast down". 
Ignoble hands obeyed, quick to curry favor with the new- 
made ruler, and the queen fell to her death upon the 
flagstones before King Jehu's chariot so that "her blood 
was sprinkled upon the wall and on the horses . . . and 
he trod her underfoot ..." 

The Old Testament account of Jehu's wholesale destruc- 
tion of his opponents enumerates the eventual extermina- 
tion of seventy descendants of Ahab, and forty-two broth- 
ers of the King of Judah, together with all the known fol- 
lowers of Baal. The latter Jehu treacherously assembled 
at Samaria, ostensibly to celebrate a religious feast in 
which he pretended to join. When the great concourse of 
pagan worshippers had filled the temple, Jehu's soldiers 
put them all to the sword. There is little of the admirable 
in that rebel victory. 

As was customary, after the bloody and unequal con- 
test against Jezebel in the city of Jezreel, Jehu held a 
triumphal feast in jubilation of his dubious achievement. 
The narrative asserts that "when he had eaten and drunk 
. . ." he spoke to his military aides saying, '"Go, see now 
this cursed woman, and bury her, for she was a king's 
daughter". And they went to bury her, but found no more 
of her than the skull, and the feet, and the palms of her 
hands". 

Without, and probably within the palace, bodies of the 
victims were thickly strewn. Fierce and scavenger dogs, 
abhorred by the populace, had been ravenously devouring 
the corpses. Into this horribly bewildering shambles went 
Jehu's men to seek the body of a queen. And among those 
pitiable and mingled fragments, where vengeful swords had 
smitten and where voracious beasts had gorged, they re- 
covered all that could be recognized as that which once 
was Jezebel. 

Aside from its sordid significance, to the point in ques- 
tion, this case is one of prime importance that implies but 
one solution. In order to find these sought-for body por- 
tions, so sorrowfully similar to the many other bits of 
scattered flesh, the searchers must have had some clue for 
guidance; but these men. King Jehu's aides, were soldiers, 
and as such, inevitably had experience in law enforcement, 
which was a vital issue in those olden times of social 
turbulence. Reason insists that some means of identifica- 
tion must have been employed, and although the Bible 
history makes no direct mention of this in the story of 
Jezebel, the allusion to her hands and feet suggests that 
herein was included recognizable identity. 

It is improbable that the science of Dermatography 
then could have been highly specialized, but the evidence 
shows that Jehu's officers possessed knowledge which 
enabled them to verify those torn remains. 

In off^ering proof that Bible days saw recognition of 
the importance contained in hands and fingers, there is 
no need to over-tax credulity. The frequent and conclu- 
^Co7itinued on Page 36 J 



Page 10 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



August, 1945 



BAY COUNTIES' 



Peace Officers^ Association 



MEETINGS EVERY MONTH 



Chief Harold A. Zink, President 



Captain Bernard McDonald, Secretary-Treasurer 



For years one of the outstanding meetings of the Bay 
Counties' Peace Officers' Association has been the one 
held each summer at which the Chief of Police and his 
men of San Mateo were hosts. Since Inspector Robert 
O'Brien was elevated to the office of Chief following the 
death of Chief Thomas Burke, he has carried on the cus- 
tom, started by his former chief, by holding an outdoor 
barbecue. Formerly these barbecues were held at Coyote 
point. This year in July Chief O'Brien selected the old 
St. Mary's estates back of the county hospital north of 
Belmont, and the turn out was bigger than any former 




Chief Robert O'Brien 

meeting and the fare and program provided made it one 
that matched past gatherings. 

Chief O'Brien, Captain George D. Martin, Inspector 
Tom Connors, Sergeant Manuel Trinta and every mem- 
ber of the Department entired into the spirit of the occa- 
sion. Inspector Connor with other members of the force 
did the cooking and the chicken they turned out to the 
upward of 200 guests would have done credit to the handi- 
work of the chefs of San Francisco's top-flight hotels. 
There were red beans, potato salad and ice cream, with 
even plenty of butter. An there was coffee and plenty of 
other refreshments. 

The setting for the barbecue, which by the way, has 
been taken over by Axel Johnson for subdivision, is a most 
picturesque spot, away from the busy streets and markets. 

Assisting as host at this July meeting were Chief Jack 



Theuer of Burlingame and Chief Walter Wisnom of 
Hillsborough. 

These three Chiefs of Police introduced their mayors, 
other city officials and prominent guests, at the invitation 
of Chief Howard Zink of Palo Alto, President of the 
Association. 

Chief Zink on calling the meeting to order announced 
that Dr. Leo McMahon, who has been absent from many 
past meetings was on hand, and Dr. McMahon responded 
by telling some humorous stories for which he is famous, 
and he received a mighty hand from the large audience 
for these stories and the fact that he is able to attend the 
meetings again. 

Others presented to the guests were Sheriff James Mc- 
Grath, Chief Charles W. Dullea, former Chief of Bur- 
lingame John J. Harper, Chief L. E. Jones of Richmond, 
Sheriff Dan Murphy, all past presidents; Ward Walkup, 
who brought the sad news that his former fellow San 
Francisco Police Commissioner, William Wobber was 
confined in St. Francis hospital by illness; Chief O'Brien's 
father, John, Sr., and Sheriff McGrath's father, Nate 
Pieper, Chief Special Agent of the FBI, and Judge Max- 
well McNutt of San Mateo's Superior Court. 

Judge McNutt took the floor for a speech that was given 
in favor of his county's peace officers and was given a big 
hand by all present. 

The speaker of the day was Colonel Charles Steele 
provost officer for this area. 

He told of the small percentage of law and rules vio- 
lators in the United States Armed Forces and of the work 
that has been done by the Provost Department. He ex- 
plained that those convicted of serious offenses while in the 
service were given a chance to reform and be restored to 
service and he said that thousands of men have taken ad- 
vantage of this opportunity and are now doing and have 
been doing outstanding work. 

He said he was disappointed at the failure of so many 
men released from prisons to join the army or navy, to 
make the grade. 

He congratulated the San Francisco Police Department 
for the co-operation it has rendered his service, and he 
stated that the best M.P.'s were those recruited from 
Police Departments and Sheriff's Offices. 

The control of social diseases by the navy and army he 
said has reduced the two leading infectious diseases among 
the personnel of the two services to a remarkably small 
number. 

He said Chief Dullea has gone all-out in giving him 
(Continued on Page 27) 



August, 194 J 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 11 



FBI Police Academy Graduates 
Two Bay Area Officers 



After completing fourteen weeks of intensive training 
Captain Artel J. Lamoureux of the San Leandro, Cali- 
fornia, Police Department, and Deputy Sheriff Richard 
E. (Dick) Condon, of the Alameda Sheriff's Office, at 
Hayu'ard, California, graduated from the FBI National 
Academy in Washington, D. C, on Saturday, July 21, 
194'?. 

Director John Edgar Hoover of the FBI announced re- 
cently that diplomas were awarded to each of the graduates 
following addresses hy Tom C. Clark, Attorney General 
of the United States, and Thomas I. Parkinson, President 
of the Equitable Life Assurance Society of the United 
States 

The graduating class, which constituted the twenty- 
ninth session of the Academy, was composed of 78 repre- 
sentatives from state, county and local law enforcement 
agencies in 30 states and the Panama Canal Zone. 

The members of this graduating class received extensive 
training in the field of crime prevention and present and 
future traffic problems. The FBI's staff of experts also 
emphasized instruction on wartime law enforcement and 
problems likely to arise in the postwar era. 

Among the prominent authorities on child delinquency 
who lectured to the officers throughout the course were: 

Dr. William Healy, Judge Baker Guidance Center for 
Childhood and Youth, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Dr. Augusta Fox Bronner, Judge Baker Guidance Cen- 
ter for Childhood and Youth, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Dr. Arthur L. Beeley, Dean, Department of Sociology, 
University of Utah. 

Reverened Edmund A. Walsh, S. J., Georgetown Uni- 
versity, Washington, D. C. 

Honorable Matthew McGuire, United States District 
Court, Washington, D. C. 

Dr. James S. Plant, Director, Essex County Child Guid- 
ance Clinic, Newark, New Jensey. 

Honorable G. Howland Shaw, National Conference of 
Juvenile Agencies, Washington, D. C. 

Three weeks of the course were devoted to an intensive 
study of traffic engineering and traffic law enforcement 
work. Nationally-known experts in this field appeared 
before the class, including: 

John M. Gleason, Chief of Police, Greenwich, Conn. 

Captain William L. Groth, Virginia State Police. 

Harold F. Hammond, Director, Traffic Division, Na- 
tional Conservation Bureau, New York, New York. 

E. H. Holmes, United States Public Roads Administra- 
tion, Washington, D. C. 

Burton W. Marsh, Director Traffic Education and 
Safety, American Automobile Association, Washington, 
D. C. 

Theodore M. Matson, Director, Bureau of Highway 
Traffic, Yale University. 



Dr. Amos E. Neyhart, Pennsylvania State College. 

Mr. Wilbur Smith, Bureau of Highway Traffic, Yale 
University. 

Dr. Herbert J. Stack, Director, Center for Safety Edu- 
cation, New York University. 

Officials of the FBI and leaders in the law enforcement 
and teaching professions also appeared before the group. 
Other visiting lecturers were: 

Dr. Earl C. Arnold, Dean, Vanderbilt University Law 
School, Nashville, Tennessee. 

Walker Stone, Scripps-Howard Newspaper Alliance, 
Washington, D. C. 

Michael J. Godfrey, Acting Chief of Police, Hartford, 
Connecticut. 

Walter F. Anderson, Commander, North Carolina 
State Highway Patrol and the Highway Safety Division. 
Professor Albert Coates, Director, The Institute of Gov- 
ernment, Chapel Hill, North Carolina. 

Lt. Col. Homer Garrison, Jr., Director, Department of 
Public Safety, Austin, Texas. 

Dr. J. R. Heller, Jr., Medical Director, United States 
Department of Public Health, Bethesda, Maryland, 

Honorable Alexander Holtsoff, Special Assistant to the 
Attorney General.. United States Department of Justice, 
Washington, D. C. 

Joseph Kluchcsky, Chief of Police, Milwaukee, Wis- 
consin. 

Dr. A. Magruder MacDonald, Coroner of the District of 
Columbia. 

Bruce Smith, Acting Director, Institute of Public Ad- 
ministration, New York, New York. 

Captain Lamoureux is well known to the officers in this 
area, having been a veteran of the last war and with the 
San Leandro Police Department since 1930. 

Dick Condon, as he is known to his friends, has been 
with the Alemeda County Sheriff's Office as Deputy 
Sheriff since February, 1937. Since July, 1941, Condon 
has been Deputy Detective for his department. 

These two recent NPA graduates will join 62 other 
graduates. This makes California second only to New 
York in the total number of men graduated from the FBI 
National Academy. 



AVANSINO, MORTENSEN 8c CO. 

WHOLESALE FLORISTS 



175.177 FIFTH STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



EXbrook 6674 

DISTINCTIVE FURS BY 

IRVING KELLER 

MANUFACTURING FURRIER 

2 78 POST STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Page 12 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



August, 1945 



Captain Charles F. Skelly Dies 



Captain Charles F. Skelly died last June after an illness 
of a few weeks. In his passing the San Francisco Police 
Department lost one of its most intelligent and efficient 
commissioned officers. At the time of his death he was 
Captain of the Traffic Bureau, holding at the same time 




Captain Charles t. Skelly 

the office of secretary to the Police Commission, a job 
he had filled since March 21, 1907, with the exception of 
an interlude when he was executive secretary to former 
Mayor Angelo J. Rossi. 

Since January 28, 1902, when at 22 years of age he 
joined the Police Department, he had an important part 
in the development of the Department. He was a printer 
before he became a police officer, and he learned to be a 
stenographer, a calling that attracted the attention of his 
superiors shortly after he donned officer uniform. He had 
been called in to take down some testimony in a police 
trial and did the job so well he never went out on the beat 
again, being assigned to the office of Secretary of the Com- 
mission. Here he continued to attract favorable attention, 
so that in March, 1907, when a vacancy occurred he was 
given the top job. The fact that during the fire and earth- 
quake of April, 1906, he took all the police records into 
Portsmouth Square where they were saved from the con- 
flagration, didn't hurt his chances for the new post. Inci- 
dentally it might be stated here that because of Officer 
Skelly 's foresight in propeHy protecting the police records, 
the police department was the only branch of the city's 



government enjoying the preservation of their historical 
and legal data. 

Captain Skelly for years before prohibition, handled the 
license bureau in addition to his clerical duties with the 
Police Commission, and in the days when liquor licenses 
were handled by the Police Department that added chore 
was a most important one. 

He took all promotional examinations and progressed 
through all the ranks, being made a Corporal on June 6, 
1911, a Sergeant, June 28, 1915, Lieutenant, August 11, 
1919, and Captain on February 22, 1921. 

He served under former Chief William J. Quinn as 
Deputy Chief, being appointed to the position on April 
16, 1935, and holding the job until February 15, 1940. 
He served as executive secretary to former Mayor Rossi 
from March 2, 1942, to December 31, 1943. He was made 
Captain of Traffic when Captain Albert Munn retired for 
disability on March 26, 1944. 

In every assignment given Captain Skelly he discharged 
the duties imposed with loyalty, a keen understanding of 
what those duties were, an honesty that sets a record for 
all to emulate, and a knowledge of law enforcement from 
every angle and of police administration that was out- 
standing. 

During the 43 years he was a member of the Police Force 
he took a major part in its development, and he saw it be- 
come one of the best police organizations, with a record 
of crime suppression and criminal apprehension excelled 
by no other metropolitan police department. 

His funeral was held from the Star of the Sea Church, 
and a motorcycle honor guard escorted the remains from 
the Church to Holy Cross Cemetery. Men and women 
from every walk of life gathered to pay final respect to 
the departed Captain and there was a big representation 
from the San Francisco Police Department as well as from 
Oakland's Department. 



ANGELO J. ROSSI CO., INC. 

FLOWERS FOR ALL OCCASIONS 



45 GRANT AVENUE 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



MONROE-ANDREWS 

MEN'S WEAR 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



ROBINSON'S PET SHOP 



125 MAIDEN LANE 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Telephone GArfield 233 7 

P. G. MOLINARI 8C SONS 

Manufacturers of all Kinds of Italian Style Sausages 
Imported and Domestic Groceries, Otive Oil, Wines & Liquors 



373 COLUMBUS AVENUE 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Aiigtist, 1945 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 

Inspector William McMahon 



Page 13 



Few men in law enforcement have ever achieved the 
fine record of Inspector Wilham McMahon, who, last 
month died after a year's illness. Cited twelve times for 
meritorious conduct by the San Francisco Police Depart- 
ment Commissioners he did more than any other man of 
the Department during his more than twenty-four years 




Inspector William McMahon 

as a member, in bringing to account hold-up men, bank 
robbers and others who sought a livelihood by the gun. 

He was an uncompromising foe of the yegg and thug, and 
when once he was assigned to ferret out any of this ilk, 
he was tireless in his campaign to get his man, and always 
brought his man in. A well built man, blessed with a keen 
brain, absolutely without fear, he had an uncanny fund 
of knowledge on the ways of the so-called smart criminal 
who was never very smart when McMahon went on his 
trail. 

Inspector McMahon was born in San Francisco on 
March 20, 1892, and was educated in our local schools 
and followed the calling of an engineer before he joined 
the Police Department on January 17, 1921. He was as- 
signed to Company F and later transferred to Company 
C and Company E, but so ably did he work as a patrol- 
man and so apt was he in arresting burglary and robbery 
suspects that he only remained on the "street" for three 
years. He was brought into the old Detective Bureau on 
January 8, 1924, and from the first week of his new assign- 
ment he showed the stufi^ of which he was made. 

The first big case that drew general attention to his 
work was the capture of the notorious Bill O'Connors, big 
time daylight jewelery store and bank robber, who was 
taken in a gun battle in a hotel on Fifth Street near Mar- 
ket Street. 

He took an active part in the capture of McNab and 
Sampsel, bank robbers who spent their time between rob- 
beries along the Pacific Coast on a palatial yacht and in 



the exclusive and expensive resorts of the west coast. 

It was through the efforts of Inspector McMahon that 
kept these two murderous bank robbers from being released 
from prison where they were mixed up in several attempts 
to break out of Folsom and McNab later from San Quen- 
tin. In these jail-breaking attempts men were killed before 
the pair were overpowered. 

Later McMahon got a citation for arresting an auto 
thief after shooting it out with him. In February, 1930, he 
took part in the apprehension of two heavily armed hold- 
ups and in June 1929 he helped jerk out of circulation two 
heavily armed bank robbers. In 1934 he jingle-handed 
brought in two more robbers. 

Clyde Stevens and Albert Kissell, two bad hold-up men, 
incarcerated in San Quentin after being captured in San 
Francisco for a series of robberies, made a sensational es- 
cape from San Quentin in January, 1931. They were cap- 
tured later on Sherman Island on information gathered by 
Inspector McMahon, who was a member of the posse that 
captured the much-wanted pair up in the San Joaquin 
River. He was cited for meritorious conduct on other oc- 
casions and one of the latest was his arrest of Horace Davis 
in December, 1938. 

Inspector McMahon not only knew how to go about 
terminating the careers of men engaged in robberies, get- 
ting the evidence not only of crimes committed in this city 
but clearing many crimes in outside cities, but he was a 
wonderful man on the witness stand. He testified with an 
air of one who knew what it was all about, effective before 
a jury and always had the highest respect of the judges 
who heard the many cases he brought before them. 

He was "all policeman." During his nearly 2T years on 
the force it was not a means to gain a livelihood to him, 
it was his very life. He never knew about clocks or quit- 
ting times when he was on a case, and the long hours he 
put on the many jobs assigned him finally took its toll. 
Last year he suffered a relapse and so much had he given to 
the cause of law enforcement, which he had dedicated his 
very being, that he was unable to rally back to health. 
He was put on the Secret Service detail with Inspector 
Allan McGinn where he gained a little, because he could 
not stand to be idle, and against the advice of his many 
friends in and out of the Department he insisted on carry- 
ing on. These friends saw him gradually failing away, 
until he passed on in the presence of his wife. 

Inspector McMahon 's passing will leave a vacancy in 
the Police Department that will never be filled. He leaves 
a record that will last for many generations to come, and 
the people of San Francisco can thank him continually for 
giving them the security they enjoyed during his lifetime, 
by his acts in apprehending those who seek a living by 
force and violence. 

He was a mighty popular man among those with whom 
he worked. He was an unrelenting foe of the crook, yet 
he was fair and never did anything that was wrong or 
(Continued on Page 52) 



1 



Page 14 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS- JOURNAL 



August, 1945' 



Captain Michael GaFfey New Secretary of 

Police Commission 



Captain Michael GafFcy assigned to the position of Sec- 
retary to the San Francisco Police Commission, following 
the death of Captain Charles F. Skelly is rounding out 25 
years as a member of the city's Police Department. 

Since his appointment as a patrolman hack on April 
16, 1921, he has tackled this job of preservation of the 
peace with earnestness and intelligence, and with no spec- 
tacular outbursts he applied his efforts to go higher in 





Captain Michael Gaffey 

his chosen profession. Few men have progressed as far as 
he has in the twenty-four years or more he has been a 
police officer, or merited the advancements he has made. 

He was a railroad policeman when he joined the force, 
and he had the background of experience befitting one 
for law enforcement work on a metropolitan Police Force. 
He took all promotional examinations and passed well 
up on the list of eligibles. He was made a corporal Decem- 
ber 27, 1928; a Sergeant, April 6, 1931, a Lieutenant 
December 8, 1938, and a Captain, May 12, 1942. 

From the beginning of his career as a commissioned 
officer he attracted the attention of his superiors. When 
the Golden Gate Exposition was held on Treasure Island 
in 1940 he was a lieutenant assigned to the Central Sta- 
tion. The late Captain John J. O'Meara, who was detailed 
to head the force of officers charged with policing the Ex- 
position, selected Lieutenant Michael Gaffey to be his top 
assistant. The history of the splendid job the San Fran- 
cisco Police did in protecting the millions of visitors and 
keeping all crimes out of the great world's fair is well 
known and Lieutenant Gaffey had no little part in produc- 
ing this history. 

When he was made a Captain he was first assigned to 
Taraval Station and when the war got going and Potrero 



Station, with its setting in the City's teeming industries, 
called for an able commissioned officer to give the area 
the maximum of police protection. Captain Gaffey was 
selected for the job. He ably grasped the needs of the area. 
He had his men on their toes and the thousands upon 
thousands of workers engaged in shipbuilding, and other 
war essentials were never even delayed for a moment in 
getting to and from their jobs. He had a large part of the 
railroad yards to police, he had the care of the multitude 
of newcomers who found residence in the Potrero area, 
and he had a problem on his hand with automobile traffic 
during the peak-hours o{ the days. But his understanding 
and his knowledge of the job, resulted in everything going 
on day after day with nary a hitch or delay. 

So well did he do his work that when there was a va- 
cancy in the office of Supervising Captain of Districts 
Chief Dullea chose Captain Gaffey. He was appointed as 
Supervisor of Captains on March 21. 1944. In this spot 
he further exemplified his ability as a high class officer in 
every capacity his job called for. 

His selection as secretary of the Police Commission by 
Commissioners Jerd Sullivan, John Wesley Howell and 
E. L. Turkington is just another tribute to the thoroughness 
he has approached every assignment he has been given. 

The record of Captain Gaffey shows no instance where 
he has ever been called before his superior officers nor a 
single charge that would have brought him before the 
Police Commission. 

His advancement in the San Francisco Police Depart- 
ment is an example of the opportunity that is offered to 
every young man who takes up enforcing the law of the 
land as his life's work. It calls for character, courage, 
honesty, intelligence and hard study. That's how Captain 
Gaffey got where he is now. No politics, no pull; but on 
merit alone, doing well all tasks he has been given. 

Phone Piedmont 1826 

PIEDMONT LUMBER 8C MILL CO. 



35 1 40th STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone HIgate 7862 



J. Ulrich 



CALIF. ELECTRO PLATING WORKS 

Household Hardware, Auto Parts Polished and Refinished 
Gold, Silver, Nickel, Copper, Bronze, Brass Plating & Oxidizing 

1132 EAST I2lh STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 



SAN PABLO AUTO WRECKING CO. 



3285-91 SAN PABLO AVENUE 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone KEIIog 3-388S 



National Batteries 



ROY'S 



TIRE AND BATTERY SERVICE 
Recapping and Repairing — New Tires and Tubes 

1248 HIGH STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 



August, 1945 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 15 



Coast Guard Celebrates 150th Birthday 

By Mel Venter, Lieutenant, U.S.C.C.. Public Relations Officer 



The United States Coast Guard, oldest commissioned 
service in the nation, celebrated its 155th birthday on 
August 4th in a way the Japs don't like. 

Out in the far Pacific invasion fronts Coast Guardsmen 
will commemorate the occasion with renewed blows at 
the enemy. 

Their major assignments on the European front finished, 
they will mark another year of putting their fighting surf- 



home front — vastly increased with San Francisco Bay 
now the main funnel for shipment of men, munitions and 
supplies to the Pacific Fighting fronts — the Coast Guard 
is continuing to write a brilliant chapter in combat zones. 
In every major invasion since the sneak attack on De- 
cember 7, 1941 — be it North Africa, Sicily, Salerno, Nor- 
mandy, Guadalcanal, Tarawa, Leyte, Iwo Jima or Oki- 
nawa — fighting men with "USCG" emblazoned across 




H-HOUR! . . . American fighting men slog through the surf from a Coast Guard landing boat on a Pacific 
beach. Carrying Marine and Army forces ashore against withering enemy fire is one of the many war-time 
services of the Coast Guard, oldest commissioned service in the nation, which commemorates its 15 5th 
birthday on August 4. 



man's skill into difficult amphibious landing operations 
against the Japanese; manning troops, assault and supply 
ships; performing escort and convoy duties. Withal, they're 
not neglecting their traditional peacetime activities of 
protecting life and property on the seacoasts and water- 
ways, or their vital wartime assignments on Port Security. 

To be sure, there will be speeches throughout the na- 
tion by a grateful people. And there will be a glow of 
pride by Coast Guardsmen from here to Okinawa. But 
there will be no pause in the main job. 

Today, the 170,000 men and women wearing the Coast 
Guard shield on their right forearm have earned commen- 
dations from ranking Army, Navy and Marine officers, 
and from government, state and municipal ofiicials. 

While performing vital Port Security duties on the 



their steel helmets have manned tiny landing craft darting 
from giant transports to enemy shores. 

With a minimum of fanfare, the Coast Guard has per- 
formed its important war-time services. Few know that 
this was the first American service to take German pris- 
oners in this war; that a Coast Guardsman, helping in 
the rescue of Marines trapped behind enemy lines at 
Guadalcanal, won the Congressional Medal of Honor 
posthmously; that a Coast Guardsman was responsible 
for the capture of saboteurs who landed on Long Island 
from a Nazi submarine; that a Coast Guard "Splinter 
Fleet," made up of small 8J-footers originally designed for 
shore patrol — rescued more than 800 survivors of ships 
blasted by enemy fire at Normandy. 

(Continued on Page 45 ) 



Page 16 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL August, 1945 

Some Arc True and Some Are False --- Rate Yourself 



1. Sex crime convictions rank low because arresting 
officers fail to properly present such cases through lack of 
experience in the handling of such cases. 

2. Unless the burglar is armed with a deadly weapon 
or so arms himself while in the commission of the offense 
or assaults a person while in the commission of the offense, 
he cannot commit burglary of a dwelling house in the night' 
time unless the dwelling house is inhabited. 

3. Every person remaining present at a place of riot 
except public officers and persons assisting them in at' 
tempting to disperse the rioters is guilty of a misdemeanor. 

4. The Police Courts have jurisdiction of all cases of 
Assault and Battery. 

5. The circumstances under which an instrument (legal) 
was made may be shown to aid the court in its interpre- 
tation. 

6. The order of proof in criminal actions is regulated by 
law. 

7. In so-called "entrapment" cases both the officer who 
created the situation and the party arrested violate the law. 

8. Moral certainty is sufficient to establish the guilt of 
a felon. 

9. Of the California Codes, the Code of Civil Proced- 
ure deals only with the presentation and handling of cases 
in court and the Penal Code with crimes only. 

10. The maximum punishment for burglary of the first 
degree is the same as the maximum punishment for rob- 
bery of the first degree. 

n . If one person maliciously and willfully disturbs the 
peace or quiet of another peron by loud noise, the doing 
so is a misdemeanor. 

12. Failure of a sheriff to pay over fines coming into 
his hands according to law and within twenty days after 
receipt thereof is a misdemeanor. 

13. The maximum punishment for first degree arson is 
the same as the maximum punishment for first degree 
robbery. 

14. Major crimes have fallen off during the past five 
years. 

15. The phrase "night time," as used in the Chapter of 
the Penal Code dealing with the crime of burglary, is de- 
fined and has the same meaning as the words "night time" 
have in the Vehicle Act (California). 

16. Every person, except a police officer, having a pick 
lock in his possession when arrested is guilty of a misde- 
meanor. 

17. The driving away of the personal property of an- 
other is larceny. 

18. The stealing of a goat is grand larceny. 

19. Sex is the principal reason for the disappearance 
of minors from their homes. 

20. Every person who enters a house with the malicious 
intention of resisting an officer is guilty of burglary. 

21. Nighttime burglaries are first degree burglaries. 

22. Day time burglaries are of the second degree. 

23. A complaint for any misdemeanor triable in a Police 



Court must be filed within one year after its commission. 

24. If a police judge is satisfied that a public offense 
triable before him has been committed he must in all cases 
issue a warrant for the arrest of the accused. 

25. The crime of forgery has shown an increase during 
the past five years. 

26. The stealing of a mule valued at $150.00 is petty 
larceny. 

27. Second degree burglary may be committed in the 
night time. 

28. If a change of venue is legally granted, the case 
must be transferred to another justice or judge of the same 
county. 

29. For all public offenses the court must determine all 
questions of law which may arise in the trial. 

30. Accuracy, as to results, is the only difference be- 
tween ballistic and fingerprint identification. 

31. In police court proceedings the jury may sometimes 
decide questions of both law and fact. 

32. In a police court, after hearing all the evidence, the 
jury may render their verdict in court, without retiring, 
if they so wish. 

33. A complaint may include more than one allegation 
but every allegation made in a complaint must be proved. 

34. It is legal that a witness may refresh his memory in 
court from any memorandum which he may have in his 
possession, 

35. Neither party to a trial may impeach its own wit- 
ness. 

36. So-called "Contraband Control" is maintained for 
the securing of public revenue and the protection of public 
health and morals. 

37. In a trial, secondary evidence, as such, is not ad- 
missible. 

38. Common Law rules that penal statutes are to be 
strictly construed to govern our Penal Code interpretations. 

39. Words used in the Penal Code in the so-called "pres- 
ent tense," include the past as well as the present. 

40. Conditions may warrant charging dog stealing as 
grand larceny. 

41. "A" buys brass used by a railroad company but fails 
to use due diligence in the matter of ascertaining that the 
seller has a legal right to sell the brass. "A" is open to 
a charge of felony for this purchase. 

42. John Doe embezzles property in Oregon and is ar- 
rested in San Francisco on the charge. He may be tried and 
convicted here. 

43. Forging of numbers on an engine may be discovered 
because the stamping of the numbers caused chemical 
changes in the metal, when the automobile engine was 
being numbered at the factorj^ 

44. Every person who, in the City and County of San 
Francisco, saves any property from fire, and for two days 
thereafter willfully neglects to notify the Fire Marshal 
regarding such property is guilty of a felony. 

(Continued on Page 39) 



August, 194 J 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



Page 17 



Sheriff Broaddus of Mendocino County 



Mendocino county lias, as its chief law enforcement 
officer, Sheriff B. G. Broaddus, serving his first term in 
that office, having been elected at the election in Novem- 
ber, 1942. For nearly three years he has enforced the laws 
in the picturesque county with its many resources, such 
as cattle raising, lumbering, dairying and farming, and 
one of the leading communities in this state for recreational 
attractions, being noted for its fishing and hunting for 
small and big game. 

During his incumbency he has established a record of 
more than 95 % convictions of people arrested for crime. So 
well has he assembled evidence against men charged with 
offense he generally goes into court with a confession from 
the suspect who enters a plea of guilty, thus saving much 
expense to the taxpayers of the county. 

Sheriff Broaddus was born on June 16, 1900, in Santa 
Clara County, but later went to live in Willets with his 
father and mother. His father was a pioneer of Mendocino 
County and his mother, Mrs. Mar>' J. Broaddus was born 
in New York State. 

He was appointed Undersheriif of his adopted county 
on September 17, 1932, and soon became an authority 
on civil and criminal laws as well as a fingerprint expert, 
recognized throughout the state. 

Has always taken an active part in the social, fraternal 
and civic affairs of his county, and he maintains these activ- 
ities in his headquarters city, Ukiah. He is a member of the 
Masonic fraternity, the Eagles, Lions' Club and the 
Grange. 

During the early years of this World War he was 
chairman of the County Civilian Defense, and organized 
the citizens of his terrain, and carried the burden of the 
organization in a splendid manner. 

At the present time he is secretary of Zone 3, California 
Sheriffs' Association, and takes a prominent part in the 
affairs of that organization. 

As sheriff he maintains a fine bureau of identification, 
and a year ago last January he installed two-way radio in 
all his motor equipment, and has as all other law enforce- 
ment agencies, found that this addition has resulted in the 
saving of time and expense, and his work of enforcing 
the laws is made more efficient. 

His force of deputies include the following: 

Undersheriff J. Broaddus appointed last July 9, after 
serving with the United States Navy for 17 months over- 
seas. 

Chief Criminal Deputy — William A. White. Deputy 
White was formerly Chief of Police of Willets. and is a 
very thorough and able investigator. 

C. L. Hollingsworth, also former Willets Chief of 
Police, who is a very capable officer. 

Bailiff L. G. Morgan, who maintains the high standard 
established by the Sheriff's force. 

Sheriff Broaddus is married, his Vvife being the former 
Miss Lucy Ford, the daughter of a Mendocino pioneer 
family. They have three sons, all in the service of their 



country. 

First Lieutenant Arthur B., is in the Army Transporta- 
tion Corps, now on duty in the Pacific; 

William A. is a Naval Aviation Cadet, due to get his 
wings in a short time; 

Robert R. is a seaman first class with the United States 
Navy, now on duty on a Destroyer Escort in the South 
Pacific war area. 

Mendocino County is a law-abiding area and Sheriff 
Broaddus has during his some 23 years as a peace officer, 
done his share to make it such a peaceful place. 



Calpella Liquor Store 

Andy and Kay 

MIXED DRINKS 

PACKAGE LIQUOR 

BEERS — WINES 

DANCING 

CALPELLA, CALIFORNIA 



Phone 423 



Bill Ostini's Cafe 



LIQUORS — TOBACCOS 



UKIAH, CALIF. 



Phone 15 Ask for "Lo" or "Joe" 

See Us at the . . . 

Laytonville Cottage Court 

and 

Laytonville Mercantile Co. 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE 

GASOLINE & OILS 

Geige & Jting, Prop. 

LAYTONVILLE, CALIF. 



Page 18 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 

Praise Letters to Chief Dullea 



August, 194 J 



The following communications have been received by 
Chief Charles W. Dullea: 

"I am writing this letter to express my appreciation for 
the courtesy and cooperation shown me by Motorcycle 
Officer Walter Freylach, Co. K. Recently my automobile 
was stalled on a hill with the starter stuck. I asked the 
officer if he could help me and he very courteously came 
with me, and not only fixed it but showed me what to do 
in case it should happen again. Without his help I would 
have been in a most unfortunate position. 

Mrs. Audrey Davis, 

759 Sweeny Street." 

* * * 

"I have occasion to be very grateful for a favor extended 
by one of your officers (Officer Veston B. Williamson), 
but the favor was done under circumstances to that I did 
not learn his name, and being anxious to express my thanks 
I shall address them to you and express my pleasure that 
the officers of your department should go out of their way 
to be extremely courteous to persons unknown to them. I 
was invited by an Army Officer friend, to accompany him 
to one of the early meetings of the Conference in San 
Francisco. He told me that he would meet me at a certain 
corner of the Opera House. He had the tickets. When I 
arrived at Van Ness Avenue, I found that I could not 
cross the street without a pass and I naturally was very 
much concerned for fear that I would miss my friend and 
would be unable to get in. I explained my problem to one 
of your officers at the corner of Van Ness Avenue and Fell 
Street. He was good enough to ask me to describe my 
friend, and your officer then stated that he was crossing 
the street to the front of the Opera House soon, would find 
the Major who was my host, and would send him over to 
me. Your officer was kind enough to go to the trouble to 
locate my friend from my identification and to send him 
to the exact spot where I was standing. Through this 
courtesy, beyond the call of duty, I was thus able to attend 
the meeting of the Conference. Of course, I should have 
inquired the name of the officer, but I guess I was suffi- 
ciently concerned about the danger of missing the Confer- 
ence, that I forgot it. At any rate, I take this occasion to 
thank you. I do wish there were some way that I could let 
the officer know how very much I appreciated his assist- 
ance. 

Robert Littler, Attorney, 

1 1 1 Sutter Street, 

Little, Coakley 6? Lauritzen." 

* * * 

"San Francisco since Pearl Harbor has had an increas- 
ingly important wartime responsibility in respect to mili- 
tary operations in the Pacific. Many official bodies, organi- 
zations and individuals have taken a part in this commu- 
nity obligation. As Executive Director of the Housing 
Authority, I wish to thank you and the officers and men of 
the Police Department for the complete cooperation you 
have furnished the Housing Authority at all times. The 



splendid teamwork of all who have had a part in this un- 
dertaking made possible the results that brought forth a 
letter of commendation from Admiral M. S. Tisdale, USN, 
for this cooperation and support. 

John W. Be.'VRD, Execiuive Sect'y, 

Housing Authority of San Francisco." 

* * * 

"On Sunday evening. May 6, 1945, my niece. Miss 
Elaine Kahn, while crossing Geary Boulevard at 12 Ave- 
nue, was struck down by a hit and run drunk driver and 
taken to the San Francisco Hospital. I wish to thank the 
officers who were quickly upon the scene, namely. Sergeant 
James Erickson and Officer Aylward of the Richmond Sta- 
tion for their kindness and attention while Miss Kahn was 
awaiting the ambulance. Also to Sergeant Edward Mc- 
Laughlin and Sergeant Arthur Morrison of the Accident 
Bureau, for their rounding up of this driver and for their 
part in bringing this man before the Superior Court on a 
felony charge. Also for the splendid attention in keeping 
in touch with me to advise of the proceedings. In these 
days to render service, many items are sadly neglected, 
however, I am most proud to state that in this case, the 
representatives of our Police Department were strictly 
mindful to render the prompt assistance, which I believe 
is due our citizens. Again thanks for this great work of 
maintaining the standard of our Police Department in 
these trying days. 

Jesse K.\hn, Insurance, 

220 Montgomery Street." 

* * * 

"The Examiner — I personally — wish to express appre- 
ciation for your generosity toward making so successful 
the "I Am An American Day" Celebration here. It was 
a grand event. It was made possible only by contributions 
such as yours. 

Cl.\rence R. Lindner, 

General Manager, S. F. Examiner." 

* ♦ H: 

"At the regular monthly meeting of the Board of Man- 
agers of the Pacific Association of the Amateur Athletic 
Union, held last Thursday night, I was instructed to write 
you and the officers and members of the San Francisco 
Police Department, and thank you for the splendid co- 
operation and protection given to the runners in the San 
Francisco Cross- City Race held on Sunday, May 5, 1945. 
Throughout the entire length of the course, your men were 
on watch and made certain that traffic did not interfere 
with the welfare of the runners. This splendid cooperation 
was commented upon by both the runners and officials. 
Again thanking you and with kindest regards, I remain, 

Al S.^NDELL, Secretary-Treasurer." 

* * * 

"Mr. Harding McGuire, the Chief of the Homicide 
Division of this office, has requested me to advise you that 
he feels the results obtained in the Major Duncan Murder 
Case, resulted from your permitting my office to work with 



August, 1945 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 19 



the Inspectors of the Homicide Division of the PoHce Dc' 
partment. Mr. McGuire wishes me to tell you that partic' 
ularly. Inspectors Husted and Corassa were on call twenty- 
four hours a day with not only physical efforts but also 
giving to Mr. McGuire, the benefit of their many years of 
experience in your department. We feel that it has done 
more than any one thing to cement the fine relationship 
that has existed between the Police Department and this 
office. I would appreciate your communicating these senti- 
ments to Inspectors Husted and Corassa. 

Edmund G. Brown, 
District Attorney." 
^ ^ ^ 

"Once again I have the pleasure of writing to you about 
the 19th Annual Review of the San Francisco School 
Safety Patrol held at Kezar Stadium on Thursday, May 17, 
1945. The San Francisco Police Department, as one of the 
sponsors of the School Safety Patrol, has a right to be 
proud of the splendid work these young soldiers of safety 
are doing in protecting the lives of their classmates. I 
have heard so many fine comments about the Review at 
Kezar and the work which the Police Department is doing 
in this field, that I want to pass these compliments to you. 
The success of the review itself was, in no small measure, 
due to the fine work of Captain John A. Reed, who de- 
tailed officers at the busy intersections around Kezar Sta- 
dium, Captain Charles F. Skelly, who detailed Ofiicers 
Theodore Andrus and Edward J. Flynn to assist Inspector 
B. J. Getchell in the formation of the parade units and 
Officers Evan James, who also assisted Inspector Getchell, 
Lieutenant Nels S. Stohl, who again had charge of the 
Reviewing Stand, and, last but not least. Inspector Byron 
J. Getchell and Officer Joseph T. Kane, whose work with 
the School Safety Patrol throughout the years, has given 
to San Francisco, the outstanding patrol units in the nation. 
Again, our sincere thanks. 

Edwin S. Moore, Manager, 
Public Safety Department, 
California State Automobile Assn." 



"We are all too quick to criticize our public officials and 
on the other hand are altogether too slow in giving a word 
of commendation when deserved. Therefore, I would like 
to express my appreciation in the service rendered me by 
Officer Edward H. Wayda. On May 26, 1945, at 5:50 
P. M., I was attacked by the conductorette while a passen- 
ger on the No. 5 car and very badly scratched about the 
face. Officer Wayda, though not on duty, stepped in and 
arrested the conductorette. She was taken to the police 
station and I to the emergency hospital. He further follow- 
ed up the case by appearing at the police court the follow- 
ing Monday morning and testified against the conductor- 
ette. It is comforting to know, not particularly for myself, 
but for my wife and daughters, that officers of your de- 
partment are always ready to be of aid whether on or off 
duty. 

E. A. HUTCHINS, 

2090 Grove Street 



"Once again I offer my thanks and the thanks of the 
San Francisco Post Office; this time for your kindness in 
furnishing police officers during the display and sale of 
goods in connection with our annual auction of unclaimed 
parcel post matter. 

"The officers handled the crowd in an excellent manner 
and are a credit to your department. With repeated thanks 
and the best of good wishes. 

WiLLi.AM H. McCarthy, 

Postmaster." 

* * * 

"The members of the Commodore Sloat School Mothers' 
Club wish to thank Officer John Reilly, Taraval Station, 
for his untiring patience with the school children of our 
district. 

"We appreciate the ability with which he has handled 
the traffic situation at the corner of Junipero Serra Boule- 
vard and Ocean Avenue. The crossing has always been a 
source of worry, particularly with the mothers. They are 
pleased to have such a dependable officer stationed there. 
Jessie P. Nosm.an, Corr. Sect'y, 

Commodore Sloat School Mothers" Club." 

^ * * 

"We would like you to know how very much we appre- 
ciate the assistance we received from the San Francisco 
Police Department, Friday evening, June 1st, 1945, in the 
Chinese Community. All of the men assigned to that area 
to help with the United States War Bond Show were ex- 
tremely co-operative and most efficient. Will you please 
convey to all of them, our sincere thanks for their splendid 
cooperation. 

Mrs. Alex.ander W. F.averm.an, 
War Finance Committee." 

* * * 

"A short time ago I was involved in an automobile acci- 
dent in San Francisco. It occurred at Third and Bayshore 
Boulevard. At the time I was naturally ver>' distressed. 
The Traffic Squad came and the officer in charge was 
named Andreotti. I have never received more courtesy, 
kindness and consideration that I did from Officer Andre- 
otti With men like him serving, one cannot help but have 
a boundless respect for the officers of the law. 

Mrs. Melxille E. Wink, 
3S0 Dana Street, Palo Alto, Cahf." 
^ * * 

"On behalf of the students, teachers and myself, I wish 
to express our appreciation for the cooperation that you 
gave in detailing officers and patrolmen to help in the 
Twelfth Annual Field Day, Competitive Drill and Victory 
Drive of the Catholic Grammar Schools, at the University 
of San Francisco's Athletic Field, June 2nd, 1945. We 
wish to commend the work done by Inspector Byron Get- 
chell, as Referee, and Officers Joseph Kane, Theodore 
Andrus and Bartholomew Sullivan. We also wish to thank 
the following men from the Richmond Police Station for 
the work they did in clearing the line of march for the 
parade: Acting Captain Grover C. Coats, Lieutenant 
James Quigley, Sergeant Glen Hughes, Patrolmen John 
(Continued on Page 38) 



Page 20 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



August, 1945 



= San Francisco = 



IMlMMlil 



5=1 PEACE OFFICERS' 



(Copyright, 1931, 2-0 Publishinc Co.) 
Founded 1922 

Business Ofiice: 465 Tenth Street 

San Francisco, California 

Phone MArket 7110 

An Official Police News and Educational Magazine Devoted 
to the Interests of 

SAN FRANCISCO POLICE DEPARTMENT 
WIDOWS' AND ORPHANS' AID ASSOCIATION 
BAY COUNTIES' PEACE OFFICERS' ASSOCIATION 
PENINSULA POLICE OFFICERS' ASSOCIATION 
NORTHERN CALIFORNIA POLICE COMMUNICA- 
TION OFFICERS' ASSOCIATION 

Published Monthly by 

San Francisco Police and Peace Officers' Journal 

S. F. Police Short Wave Radio Call KGPD 

OUR FOREIGN EXCHANGES 

THE GARDA REVIEW 2 Crow St., Dublin, Ireland 

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IMPORTANT NOTICE — Do not subscribe to S. F. POLICE 
JOURNAL through agents unknown to you personally, or 
who cannot present proper credentials on our stationery. 

ADVERTISING RATES on application. 30 



CHARLEY STONE NOT DEAD 

In the last issue of the Pohce and Peace Officers' Journal 
there was an article setting forth that Chief Charles H. 
Stone of the State Bureau of Identification had died and 
his place was temporarily being filled by Chief J. H. Mc- 
Clelland of the Attorney General's office. 

Well we found out by phone and letters and word of 
mouth that Charley Stone is not dead, that he has simply 
taken his pension under the retirement act for state em- 
ployees. A letter from Chief Charles himself denied he 
had passed on, and insisted that he get the Journal regu- 
larly. Well, the only thing the writer can say about this 
regrettable story, other than we are mighty sorry it hap- 
pened, is to recall to Chief Stone that such a story got 
around once about Mark Twain, and he denied the story 
and lived many, many years afterwards. We hope and 
trust that the retired head of the State Bureau of Identi- 
fication matches Mark Twain in the years he can enjoy 
his well-earned pension. 



S. F. POLICE EXCEED BOND QUOTA 

The San Francisco Police Department exceeded its quota 
of war bonds during the Seventh War Loan drive which 
ended early in July. The Department was told to sell 
$750,000 in bonds, but when the final returns were in 



It was found the members of the Department had taken 
care of $1,250,000 worth of sales. 

The police campaign was in charge of Captain Michael 
Gaffey and he organized the membership into an effective 
team for disposing of these bonds, the sales of which furn- 
ishes the funds so urgently needed for the completion of 
the war against Japan. 

Chief Charles W. Dullea has received an "E" flag and 
citation from the U. S. Treasury Department for the fine 
achievement of his Police Department. 



NEW JAY-WALKING SIGNS 

One of the first official acts of Captain of Traffic 
Michael Mitchell in taking over this important position in 
the San Francisco Police Department, was the installation 
of some 50 large red and white signs to warn jay-walkers 
where they should cross the streets. 

This innovation which has the complete support of 
Commissioners Jerd Sullivan, J. Wesley Howell and E. L. 
Turkington, is designed to cut down the number of acci- 
dents occasioned by pedestrians stepping out into the 
streets from sidewalks between intersections. 

Commissioner Sullivan stated on the inauguration of 
the first of these signs placed on lower Market Street that 
over 70 per cent of the fatal automobile accidents have 
been people who disregarded the crossing rules. 

These new warnings are being placed conspicuously in 
crowded business and shopping centers for the good of the 
people. The idea, he said, is to get business people who 
run out for coffee during the day and busy women shop- 
pers to walk down the block to corner crosswalks instead 
of crossing just anywhere. 



CREDIT DUE THE POLICE 

As host city to the United Nations Conference, San 
Francisco's responsibility included provision for the safety 
of the distinguished visitors, and the San Francisco Police 
Department has earned the gratitude of guests and citi- 
zens alike for the manner in which it discharged this ob- 
ligation. 

Credit for the achievement extends throughout the 
department, from the police commission and Chief Dullea 
to every officer who participated in one of the most diffi- 
cult jobs in the city's history. 

Policing the conference was of necessity painstaking 
and thorough — but it was made as unobtrusive as pos- 
sible, consistent with safety. 

Tact was called for, as well as firmness, and the de- 
partment rose to the occasion when necessary with all the 
diplomatic finesse of the UNCIO delegates whose persons 
and property were successfully safeguarded. 

— San Francisco Examiner. 

sutler 6840 684 I 

F. B. RUSSI & COMPANY 

Growers - Receivers - Shippers 
VEGETABLES - FRUITS and PRODUCE 

Specializing in Artichokes. Sprouts, Asparagus, Broccoli 

427 DAVIS STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



August, 1945 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 21 




NORTHERN CALIFORNIA 

POLICE COMMUNICATION OFFICERS 

ASSOCIATION 

Henry L. Bogardus, President 
J. D. HOSSACK, Secretary-Treasurer 



The members of the CaHfornia PoHce Radio Associa- 
tion and the Northern California Police Communication 
Officers Association, met Friday evening, May 1 1th, at 
a restaurant on Fisherman's Wharf in Monterey, to enjoy 
a dinner put on for the fellows hy Fred Deetken of the 
General Electric Company. 

Chief Fred Moore of Monterey Police Department weh 
corned the group with a short talk on the value of Radio 
Communication to Police work. Charles Simpson was 
elected to act as chairman of the business meeeting Satur- 
day, May 12th. The balance of the evening was spent in 
a general get-together. There were about- sixty members 
attending this meeting. 

On Saturday, May 12th, the joint meeting of the 
NCPCOA and CPRA was called to order by Charles 
Simpson, acting chairman, in the Council Chambers of 
the City Hall, with introductions of the Presidents and Sec- 
retaries of both groups. Vice-President E. H. McKee, 
acting as President for the NCPCOA due to the absence 
of Henry Bogardus. Statements of the subjects to be dis- 
cussed were then listed by the members present and the 
program for the business meeting was then formed. 

The first subject was the recommendation of place of 
meeting for the National APCO Convention. After due 
discussion a motion was made by B. McMurphy and sec- 
onded by Merrill LeBouef that we recommend the con- 
vention to be held in Denver, Colorado, with Kansas City, 
Kansas, as a second choice. The motion was approved 
by vote. 

The change of CW procedure was discussed and upon 
motion by Fred Crowder and seconded by E. H. McKee, 
it was decided to follow the policy of APCO in this 
matter. 

It has become increasingly necessary that there be a 
definite line of division between the Northern and South- 
ern organizations of the state. Upon motion by E. H. 
McKee and seconded by Frank Logan it was decided that 
the line of division should run from East to West along 
the North County line of Inyo County, North County 
Ime of Fresno County and the North County line of San 
Luis Obispo County. Nevada to be in the NCPCOA area, 
with the exception of Clarke County, Nevada, which will 
be in the CPRA area. On boundary line cases, frequently 
releases will be required of both groups. 

Charles Smith discussed the difficulty of communication 
on the 1414 Kc channel, due to the large number of sta- 
tions using that frequency in Central California and 
asked support of the Associations in obtaining a differ- 



ent frequency for both Santa Barbara and Ventura Coun- 
ties. After discussion it was felt that some of the interfer- 
ence was due to improper operation and monitoring and 
upon motion by B. McMurphy, seconded hy William 
Whiting a joint committee consisting of three members 
from each Association is to be appointed to investigate 
the interference on the 2414 Kc channel. The members 
agreed that a new channel is needed and would help clear 
up some of the serious interference on 2414 Kc. 

Fred Crowder stated that the interference to Police 
Channels in the high frequencies from Diathermy and like 
equipment, was becoming very dangerous and the prob- 
lem was not being adequately cared for by the present 
rules of the Federal Communications Commission. He 
presented a resolution for consideration and upon motion 
by Charles Ellison seconded by W. H. Durham the mem- 
bers voted to adopt the resolution and forward copies of it 
to the FCC and APCO (See Attached). 

Assembly Bill Number 1426, which would call for the 
taxation and licensing of all radiomen by the state was 
reported by E. S. Naschke to be in a Legislative commit- 
tee on the 15th day of May. Several members stated that 
they had talked to the author of the bill, Mr. Vernon 
Kilpatrick and he had stated that there would he changes 
made in the wording of it. On a motion by William Whit- 
ing, seconded by Merrill LeBoeuf it was voted that the 
members in Sacramento keep in touch with the progress of 
this Bill in order that a committee might appear before 
the Assembly Committee to protest it and protect the in- 
terests of the radiomen engaged in Police Communications. 

At 12:40 PM the meeting was adjourned to the Casa 
Munras for luncheon, where the members had an oppor- 
tunity to review the subjects coming up for discussion in 
the afternoon. 

The meeting was resumed at 2:10 PM and the first 
subject to be discussed was the method of granting fre- 
quency releases. On motion by Charles Ellison, seconded 
by Robert Amsbury, the members voted that the power 
of the station and the antenna specification should be 
taken into consideration before granting frequency releases. 

Upon motion by William Whiting, seconded by E. H. 
McKee, the members voted to exchange minutes of their 
respective meetings in order that better co-operation on 
various problems may be obtained. 

The subject as a common name for both the NSPCOA 
and CPRA was discussed with no action taken. 

The need of a statewide salary survey was discussed 
by the members and on motion by E. H. McKee, seconded 



Page 22 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



August, J 94 J 



by W. E. Whiteman, it was voted the Secretaries of the 
CPRA and NCPCOA make such a survey and exchange 
findings. 

The standardization of radio number code for the en- 
tire state was discussed but no agreement was reached 
between the 10 signals and the 900 signals. 

Mr. Murphy gave a complete report on the Washing- 
ton hearing regarding police frequency allocations. He 
also pointed out that block system of allocation probably 
would be best m view of the inter-channel interference 
problems. Mr. McMurphy stated that we should do some- 
thing about protecting our channels in the ultra-high fre- 
quency bands. 

A general discussion followed and it seems that there 
is considerable interference being caused adjacent channels 
by FM stations. The interference from FM so far has been 
from Public Utilities and Government stations. 

Mr. W. E. Whiteman made a motion, that each group 
appoint a committee to start an organization consisting 
of all various users of ultra-high frequencies in their re- 
spective areas, this organization to co-operate in obtaining 
frequency assignments favorable to all concerned. Sec- 
onded by E. H. McKee. The motion carried unanimously. 

Art Sowle made a motion we recommend to APCO 
and FCC that block assignments of frequencies be made 
in the ultra-high frequency bands if possible. Seconded by 
E. H. McKee. Motion carried. 

Mr. McMurphy gave a complete description of the 
proposed state-wide radio repeater service as planned by 
the State Board of Education. He stated there might pos- 
sibly be an e.xtra channel on this system, available for 
police use. 

The members then discussed the need for standard oper- 
ating procedure throughout the state. 

A motion was made by Captain Ellison, seconded by 
George Burton, that a committee be formed to work out a 
standard operating procedure, to be presented to the State 
Peace Officers meeting. Motion carried unanimously. 

Mr. Calvert stated that we should see that we are better 
represented at Peace Officers" meetings, both local and 
state, in order to promote a better knowledge of our prob- 
lems. Co-operation on our part would assure us that our 
problems be properly presented by Communications Of- 
ficers, who know what they are talking about. 

The members agreed with the remarks, the general 
opinion being we should be more aggressive and see that 
we are heard by those with whom we work and strive 
for a better understanding of our problems. 

Sgt. McKee made a few remarks, thanking the City of 
Monterey and Mr. Simpson for the courtesies extended 
our meeting. 

Resolutions Adopted By Meeting 

Be it resolved by the California Police Radio Associa- 
tion and the Northern California Police Communications 
Officers Association in joint meeting at Monterey, Cali- 
fornia. May 12, 1945, representing all of the various 
law enforcement agencies in the entire State, that a formal 
recommendation be made to the Federal Communications 



SUtter 9910 



JONES SIGNAL SERVICE 



EDW.ARD L. JONES 



HOWARD «t BEALE STS. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



JOE DI MAGGIO'S YACHT CLUB 



FISHERMAN'S WHARF 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



GArfield 0835 



DR. WM. W. HOAGLAND 

DENTIST 



908 MARKET STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



BUY WAR BONDS 
AND STAMPS 

Phone UNderhill 826 1 

H. S. WATSON CO. 

Watson Spicer Flexible Shafts 

Walson-Brown Lipe Auxiliary Transmissions 

Brown-Lipe Transmission & Power Take-Offs 

Spicer Universal Joints 



1143 HARRISON STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Phone VAlencia 1342 

MISSION TIME SERVICE 

TANNER & HIRZEL 
Jewelers - Certified Watch Repairing 

3158 22nd STREET, bet. Mission and Capp SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone DOuglas 3 114 



Pacific Vegetable Oil Corporation 



62 TOWNSEND STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



PRECISION ELECTROTYPE CO. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



Commission, requesting all necessary measures be taken 
to eliminate the intolerable interference now experienced 
by the various services on the high frequencies from dia- 



I 



August, 194? 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 23 



thermy, and allied high frequency heating equipment. 

It is felt that due to the wide distribution of equipment 
of various manufacturers, together with the probability 
of interference originating outside the boundaries of the 
various agencies concerned, and capable of producing inter- 
ference for considerable distance, that this problem cannot 
be met by individual local ordinance. 

Therefore, we recommened that the Commission take 
appropriate action to require that: 

1. All new equipment manufactured be capable of a 
high degree of frequency stability on certain assigned 
channels. 

2. That a reasonably short transition period be allowed 
wherein all such apparatus now in use, or capable 
of being used, will be required to meet the standards 
of assigned frequency, stability and suppression of 
harmonics. 

3. An acceptable alternative would be the complete 
shielding of the room containing such equipment, 
together with adequate supply line filters to com- 
pletely eliminate all radiation. 

4. All such equipment should be licensed by and under 
control of the Federal Communications Commission. 

The above resolution was unanimously approved at the 
above place and date. 

(Signed) H. B. Calvert, Secretary 

California Police Radio Assn. 
J. D. HossACK. Secretary 
Northern California Police 
Communications Officers' 
Association. 

Members Present 

Ivan Hudston, Police Department, Piedmont, KQCP. 

Lloyd F. McKinney, Police Dept., Berkeley, KSW. 

Herman J. Schwandt, Police Dept., San Jose, KGPM. 

M. J. Barlich, Sheriff's Office, Monterey County, 
KQCO. 

Henri Kirby, Police Dept., San Jose, KGPM. 

Thomas F. Manion, Sheriff's Office, Monterey County, 
KQCO. 

E. S. Naschke, Calif. Highway Patrol, Sacramento, 
KADJ. 

R. Carl Anderson, Sheriff's Office and Police, San Ber- 
nardino, KSBC. 

Walter R. Keller, Dept. of Elec, Santa Cruz, KGZT. 

Wm. V. Stancil, "Motorola". 

Milo T. Hawkins, Chief of Police, Azusa, KIBR. 

J. B. Ashurst, Chief of Police, Pomona, KNFJ. 

H. "W. Ziegler, Police Dept., Pomona, KALM. 

Robert L. Amsbury, Police Dept., Whittier, KGHY. 

J. N. Hale, Police Dept., Montebello, KQFE. 

H. S. Culver, Calif. Highway Patrol, Los Angeles, 
KAWF. 

Geo. S. Maxey, Calif. Highway Patrol, Bay Bridge, 
KRBU. 

Merrill LeBoeuf, Sutter-Yuba, KADS. 

Chas. H. Cross, Calif. Highway Patrol, Bay Bridge, 
KRBU. 



Phone HEmlock 3732 

MISSION SALAD KITCHEN 

Delicatessen - Fine Salads - Groceries 

3 147 I6lh STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone EXbrook 4885 -86-87 



HOTEL GRAYSTONE 



66 GEARY STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone ORdway 7566 



Open Day and Night 



KING'S CAFE 

American and Chinese Dishes 

472 TURK STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Compliments of 

BOND CLOTHES 

POST and KEARNY SAN FRANCISCO 

Compliments of 

ROSENBERG BROS. 8C CO. 



334 CALIFORNIA STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Compliments of 

SIGNAL OIL COMPANY 



HOTEL HERBERT 
161 POWELL STREET 
Phone sutler 0567 



HOTEL SPAULDING 

240 OFARRELL STREET 

Phone GArfield 2715 



HOTELS HERBERT AND SPAULDING 

IN THE HEART OF SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone sutler 9908 



FeUx Abaigar 



SEVILLA CLUB 



Imported and Domestic Wines and Liquors 

12 15 STOCKTON STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

HOBART WELDER SALES & SERVICE 



DON T. CAST 



1 70 RUSS STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



BUY WAR BONDS and STAMPS 
SANITARY TOWEL SUPPLY CO. 



84 NINTH STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone DOuglas 9750 GinoGiometli 

GARFIELD MARKET 

1399 KEARNY STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

HALF MOON CAFE 

Where Good People Meet 
1401 14lh STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 

ORdway 484 1 

GOLDEN GATE THEATRE 

1 TAYLOR STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

Phone WEst 7669 

WILL KING'S POOL HALL 

POOL AND BILLIARDS 
SOFT DRINKS AND REFRESHMENTS 

I632V'2 BUCHANAN STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

CHRIS POOL HALL 

POOL AND BILLIARDS 



1249 FILLMORE STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Page 24 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



August, J 94 J 



N. Arthur Sowle, State of Nevada, KRNP. 

E. H. McKee, Calif. Highway Patrol, Sacramento, 
KADJ, 

W. E. Whiteman, Sheriff's Office, Santa Ana, KGHX. 
C. E. Simpson, Police Dept,. Monterey, KRLF. 
J. D. Hossack, Calif. Highway Patrol Bay Bridge, 
KRBU. 

Geo. W. Hipley, Police Dept., San Francisco, KGPD. 
Orval Wood, Sheriffs O&ce, Tulare County, KAZF. 
R. M. Schuler, Police Dept., Fresno, KGZA. 

B. M. McMurphy, Sheriffs O&ce. Alameda County, 
KPDA. 

A. J. Morgenthal, Police Dept., Oakland, KALT. 
Ray Gada, Sheriff's Office, Modesto, KASE. 
G. K. Burton, Sheriff's Office, Contra Costa County, 
KQCE. 

Wm. F. Koch, Dept. of Forestry. 

Mott Q. Brunton, "Link," San Francisco. 

Foster G. Strong, Police Dept., Long Beach, KQAO. 

Wm. E. Whiting, Sheriff's O&ce, Bakersfield, KACS. 

Chades Smith, Shenff's O&ce, Ventura, KFOJ. 

Robert D. Miller, Sheriff's Office, Los Angeles, KQBV. 

Glen Lewis, Police Dept., San Diego, KGZD. 

Frank E. Logan, Police Dept., San Diego, KGZD. 

Fred Crowder, Los Angeles Police Dept., KGPL. 

W. H. Durham, Los Angeles Police Dept., KGPL. 

C. W. Ellison, Sheriff's Office, Los Angeles, KQBV. 

F. I. Deetken, "General Electric Co.," San Francisco, 
W2XCI. 

H. B. Calvert. Police Dept., Pasadena, KGJX. 
* * * 

The regular monthly meeting of the Northern Cali- 
fornia Police Communication Officers" Association was 
held June 14th in San Jose with Henri Kirby as host. The 
members assembled at the San Jose Police Department and 
were then conducted to the Jennings Radio Mfg. Com- 
pany, where an outdoor luncheon was served to the group 
by the Jennings personnel. 

Wm. T. Brown, (W6ECO) Chief of Police of San 
Jose welcomed the members and guests with a short talk 
on the early situations experienced in police radio in 
Santa Clara County. 

Harry Engwich of the Radio Dept., State College at 
San Jose gave a technical talk on condensers, discussing 
the various types and their purposes and the desirable and 
undesirable features of the different dielectrics. He stated 
that he believed the Jennings Company would be able 
to produce a variable vacuum condenser sometime in the 
near future. 

Jo Jennings then gave a demonstration of the method 
used in the measurement of high-frequency R. F. voltage 
and the method of measuring low frequency high voltages 
and talked on the various problems experienced in the 
manufacturing of the vacuum condensers. 

The regular meeting was then called to order by Pres. 
Bogardus and the minutes of the joint CPRA and NCP- 
COA meeting were read and approved as read. 

Ivan Hudson was appointed by Pres. Bogardus to com- 
pile data for the APCO Directive. 



GLencourt 9824 



Clay Matthews 



MATTHEW'S BOWLING ALLEY 

NO LEAGUES 

Open Week Days 5:00 P.M. — Sat. and Sun. 12:00 Noon 
578 13th ST.. at JEFFERSON OAKLAND. CALIF. 



THE "YOUNG CHINA" 

NEWSPAPER 

i\ CLAY STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Phone WAlnut 3286 



Tom Nelson. Prop. 



DEW DROP INN 

WE SPECIALIZE IN CHICKEN DINNERS 

Steaks, Chops, Sandwiches — Beer and Cold Drinks 

1615 BUCHANAN ST. SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Phone Fillmore 2 42 I 



Chas. Sullivan, Prop. 



SULLIVAN LIQUORS 

WINES — LIQUORS 



1623 POST STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Fillmore 4344 

EDWARDS dc FLEMING GROCERY 

REFRESHMENTS 

1/66 BUCHANAN STREET S.^N FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Phone WEsl 9699 



Frank Logan 



VICTORY TAVERN & RESTAURANT 



1699 POST STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Phone RAndolph 1701 P. Ramacciotti, Prop. 

HILLSIDE GROCERY 

IMPORTED AND DOMESTIC GROCERIES 

WINES — LIQUORS 

Cor. HILLSIDE AND SIL\ER ST. COLMA, CALIF. 



sutler 9412 



L. Mungnani, F. Giannini 



MILANO INN 

E. S.ANSA 
1701 POWELL ST., Near Union SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

Phone GArfield 254 1 Panelli Bros. 

LIGURE SAUSAGE FACTORY 

Wholesale and Retail 
IMPORTED AND DOMESTIC PRODUCTS — WINES AND LIQUORS 

MI'S STOCKTON ST. SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Phone SUtter 9882 



A. Urrea, J. C. Romo 



TIJUANA CANTINA 

The Right Place to Meet Your Friends — Prompt & Courteous Service 

Best Wines & Liquors Served — Mexican Dishes — Music — Fun 
671 BROADWAY SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Telephone DOuglas 3042 

JULIUS' CASTLE 

302 GREENWICH ST.. Cor. Montgomery SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 
Phone DOuglas 2 789 

Lavezzo Bros. Bacigalupi and Brichetto 

Mfrs. of Ravioli, Tagliarini, Tortellini and Vegetable-ized Noodles 
Distributors of lOCr Semolina Paste 

14 17 POWELL ST. SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Phone GArfield 9363 



.A, Mechetti, Prop. 



THE GOLD SPIKE RESTAURANT 

All Kinds of Mixed Drinks — Wc Serve Only the Best 
ITALIAN DINNERS SERVED FAMILY STYLE 

527 COLUMBUS AVE. SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Phone EXbrook 9733 Ciccio Lo Piccolo 

CICCIO'S 

COCKTAIL BAR 
ITALIAN DINNERS DE LUXE— SPECIAL A LA CARTE SERVICE 

1707 POWELL ST. SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



August, 194? 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 25 



McMurphy reported on the progress of the Standard 
Procedure Manual and stated that a rough draft would 
be ready for discussion soon. 

The Standard Code was discussed by Mr. Lewis who 
stated that instead of each Department printing their 
copies the NCPCOA should print the code in standard 
form and offer it for sale to the departments who have 
adopted it. A motion was made by Hossack, seconded by 
McMurphy that a committee be appointed to act on the 
applications from departments for additions to the code, 
assign code numbers and undertake the publication of the 
code without further delay. The motion was voted upon 
favorably and Pres. Bogardus appointed the following 
members to the code committee: Ivan Hudson, Lloyd 
McKinney, Alvin Taggart and Jim Ruys. 

Discussion concerning the Diathermy interference then 
followed with all interested members taking part. Mc 
Murphy stated that such apparatus had been assigned 
frequencies of 13.66, 27.32 and 40.98 mc, however, it is 
doubted if any are crystal controlled. 

E. H. McKee requested the July meeting be held in 
Sacramento which was accepted. 

Chief Brown was nominated and elected as an Honorary 
member of the NCPCOA. 

Jo Jennings passed around samples of the vacuum con- 
densers manufactured in his plant and then topped the 
meeting off with a round of Cokes and a vacuum con- 
denser to everyone present. The meeting was then ad- 
journed and the members were conducted on a tour of 
the Jennings plant. J. D. Hossack 

Sec.-Treas. NCPCOA 
* * * 

The Elks' Club at Sacramento was the scene of the 
regular monthly meeting of the Northern California Police 
Communication Officers Association on July 12, 194'i'. 
Sgt. McKee was host at the luncheon served preceding 
the meeting. 

The meeting was called to order by Vice-President Mc- 
Kee, acting as President in the absence of President Henry 
Bogardus. Introduction of members and guests followed 
and Mr. Phil Davis, Deputy Director of the State Depart- 
ment of Motor Vehicles gave a short welcoming speech. 
Minutes of the previous meeting were read and approved 
as read. 

McMurphy reported on the progress of the Standard 
Operating Procedure Manual Committee and read the 
material now compiled. 

Discussion of the report then followed by the mem- 
bers present. 

Ivan Hudson reported for the Standard Radio Code 
Committee and stated that only one Department had re- 
quested the printed copies of the Code. Sgt. McKee stated 
that the California Highway Patrol is preparing a booklet 
on Selective Enforcement for Statewide distribution and 
it may be possible to include the code in this booklet. 

The approved membership application of Warren 
Schulthies was read and voted upon favorably by the mem- 
bers present. Schulthies is Assistant Radio Engineer at 
KRGX. 



Phone South San Francisco 1773 



VENTURI AND BALDI 

UNION OIL PRODUCTS 



BADEN & LINDEN AVE. 



SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Phone DElaware 44 7 7 

CASTLE GARDEN GROCERY 

Best of Groceries, Fresh Fruits, Vegetables, Italian Meats, Cheese, 
Bread, etc. — Wine and Beer — Delivery Service 

SCHOOL ST. at STATION AVE. (3 blks. W. of Mission) COLMA 

Phone RAndoiph 3 103 



ED 



SALIO W 



Black Loam & Top Soil — Fertilizer — Wholesale & Retail 

199 SCHOOL STREET DALY CITY. CALIF. 



HIgate 1286 



Repairing a Specialty 



JAMES H. SMITH 

PLUMBING & HEATING 
SEWER CONTRACTING 

612 ALICE STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 

Telephone South San Francisco 1874 

SEA CAVE RESTAURANT 

LUNCHES AND ITALIAN DINNERS — COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

935 BAYSHORE BOULEVARD SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone ELkridge I 72 1 

SAM'S GROCERIES 

imported and Domestic Groceries. Poultry and Fruits 

627 1 THIRD STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Phone 271 

SANTINI 8C ROCCUCCI 

FLORSHEIM SHOES 
306 GRAND AVENUE SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Pho 



1343 



John Faraudo. Prop. 



NEW BAY SHORE CAFE 



WE SERVE ONLY THE BEST OF FOODS 
ALL KINDS OF MI.iCED DRINKS 

2 10 GRAND AVENUE SOI.ITH SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



San Bruno 695 -J Robert E. Barnes. Manager 

LOCK WOOD TAXI'>ERMY STUDIO 

GAME HEADS - BIRDS - FISH - REPTILES 

EL CAMINO REAL MILLBRAE. CALIF. 



BRISBANE POOL HALL 



BRISBANE 



CALIFORNIA 



WESTERN METAL YARD 



701 3rd STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone DOuglas 5337 

MONSON BROS. 

GENERAL CONTRACTORS 

4 75 SIXTH STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

BUY WAR BONDS 
AND STAMPS 



MARKET STREET RESTAURANT 



2097 MARKET STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



WALTER E. DROBISCH 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 
MILLS BUILDING SAN FRANCISCO 



Page 26 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



August, J 94 J 



Discussion then followed concerning the qualification 
and possible limitation of membership of those holding only 
Radio Permits, On motion of Naschke, seconded by Lind- 
feldt, two such applications for membership were returned 
to the Board of Directors for consideration and recom- 
mendation. 

An informal technical discussion by the members pres- 
ent was held for a twenty-minute period. 

McKinney reported on the requests for additional Stand- 
ard code numbers and on motion by Lewis seconded by 
Hudson the new numbers issued by the code committee 
were approved. 

The last subject was the place of the next meeting. Art 
Sowle requested the next meeting be in Reno, but with our 
transportation problem it was necessary to take a "rain 
check" on Art's request. Lewis offered to attempt to 
arrange the next meeting for the State Prison at San 
Quentin. 

The meeting was adjourned at 3:30 p.m. 



Phone HEmlock 5322 



Paul Sanders 



RITEWAY EXCHANGE 



STARTERS - GENERATORS - FUEL PUMPS 
Ford Carburetors and Ford Distributors 

45 5 GOLDEN GATE AVENUE SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone VAlencia 9737 



GORDON W. PAGE 



PAGE'S CLUB 

"Where Old Friends Meet" 

800 SOUTH VAN NESS AVENUE. Corner 19th SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone DOuglas 6549 

ERIK G. ERNSTAM 



Contracting Carpenter - Cabinetmaker 



629 COMMERCIAL STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone PRospect 7234 

PETRY 8C BRANDT 

STUDEBAKER SPECIALISTS 

Equipped to Handle Anything from the Slightest Adjustment 

to the Rebuilding of a Studebaker 

1625 PACIFIC AVENUE. Near \an Ness SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone RAndolph 4445 



E. Rossi. Prop. 



ROSSI HARDWARE CO. 

Hardware - Household - Electrical Supplies - Tools 
Paints and Oils - Sporting Goods 

5 196 MISSION STREET, Cor. Niagara Avenue SAN FRANCISCO 



STANDARD EGG CO. 



2 190 FOLSOM STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone GArfield 1147 

SCHROEDER DRAY AGE CO. 

General Hauling - Carload Distribution - City Deliveries 
324 HOWARD STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

BUY WAR BONDS and STAMPS 
GLOBE MILLS 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone GArfield 4810 

DAN S. HEWITT 

INCOME TAX SPECIALIST 

206 SANSOME STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone EXbrook 2103 

PHOTO 8c SOUND, INC. 



R. MOHR & SONS 

883 MISSION STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



SUtter 9761 



Bill Matthews, Bob Koch 



TORINO CAFE 

RESTAURANT — BAR 

2237 POWELL ST. SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF, 

SHAG ROCK GROCERY 

I 190 REVERE AVE, SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Phone EXbrook 6143 



John C. Davis 



JOHN DAVIS 

FISHING TACKLE 

24 CALIFORNIA ST, SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

UNderhill 8100 

KENYON SPENCER, INC. 

ELEVATOR SERVICE AND REPAIRS 
1173 HOWARD STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



DOuglas 3262 



SHARKEY HAT CO. 



Manufacturers of 
MEN'S AND BOYS' CAPS — UNIFORM CAPS 

143 SECOND STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

M. C, Barulich & Co., Props, 

JACKSON MARKET 

GROCERIES — DELICATESSEN 
Fruits, Vegetables, Poultry and Fresh Fish 

1201 JACKSON ST,. Cor, Jones St, SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

UNderhill 6345 

W. A. HERSCH CO. 

OFFICE SUPPLY SERVICE 

1127 FOLSOM ST. SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



EXCELSIOR BAKERY 



4492 MISSION STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Phone SUtter 6454 



Cleaning Pressing 



I. MINTZ CLOTHING STORE 

PAWN SHOP 
Dealer in All Kinds of Articles for Fishermen, Cooks and Waiters 

206 THIRD STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF, 



ALTA ROOFING COMPANY 



976 INDIANA STREET 

977 BINFORD 



SAN FRANCISCO 
OGDEN, UTAH 



Phone GArfield 03 06 

BEIER 8C GUNDERSON CO. 

NEW AND USED OFFICE FURNITURE 

7 7 BATTERY STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Phone EXbrook 8723 

KORET OF CALIFORNIA, INC. 

Manufacturers of Ladies' Sport Clothes with Companion Blouses 
Sweaters and Suits by KORET KNITS 

611 MISSION ST. SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Phone GArfield 9965 



H. E, Russell, Prop, 



153 KEARNY STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



RUSSELL GARAGE 

COMPLETE AUTOMOBILE REPAIRING 

732 FOLSOM ST, SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



August, 1945' 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 27 



BAY COUNTIES PEACE OFFICERS 

(Continued from Page 10) 
every support asked for and paid tribute to other leading 
law enforcement officers for the great part they have played 
during this war. 

Captain of Inspectors Bernard McDonald, at the end 
of Colonel Steele's address, thanked the Colonel for his 
talk and told those present how splendidly Colonel Steele 
had worked with the San Francisco Police Department in 
turning over to and furnishing necessary information on 
the occasion of the arrest of a soldier or of one wanted 
for some crime in this city. He also thanked Chief O'Brien, 
Theuer and Wisnom for the fine locale and the excellent 
program and bill of fare for the meeting. 

Those who signed place cards at the barbeque tables 
were: 

San Mateo — Mayor Claude J. Hisschey, former Mayor 
F. P. Simmen, City Mgr. W. D. Soule, Councilman S. M. 
Speers, City Attorney E. A. Wilson, Coroner Wm. Cros- 
by, Park Superintendent S. P. Pitcher, City Clerk Wm. 
J. O'Farrell, J. H. Waher, Chief Robert O'Brien, In- 
spector Tom Connors, Building Inspector V. O. Davis, 
Thos. T. Kildsen, C. A. Coe, Mike Jackson, Frank J. Arjo, 
John Rinck, Internal Revenue; Joe Walsh and William 
P. Kyne, Bay Meadows; John B. O'Brien, father of Chief 
O'Brien, Probation Officer John S. Cowgill. 

Burlingame — Mayor Peter Dahl, Police Commissioner 
Allan Hunt, Councilmen L. H. Hanim, Leon O. Whit- 
sell, Allan Hunt and I. J. Roth; Chief Jack Theuer, Cap- 
tain John J. Hartnett, Lt. Commander John H. Encle- 
mann. Axel V. Johnson, former Chief John J. Harper, 
R. L. Stone, John McGrath, father of Sheriff McGrath. 

Redwood City — Judge Maxwell McNutt, Sheriff James 
J. McGrath, Chief C. L. Collins, Councilman G. W. Mc- 
Nulty, Deputy Sheriff Jack O'Brien, Controller Fred E. 
Beer, Thomas Tuite. Probation Officer Anthony Laval. 

Phone HEmlock 167 7 



PRospect 1133 



For a Happy. Carefree Evening 



THE ARISTOCRAT 



FOR YOUR FAVORITE DRINKS 
298 TURK ST.. Cor. Leavenworth SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



EXbrook 2910 



Emil Lamedrin & Sons 



THE CRAFTSMAN PRESS 

PRINTERS 

340 FIRST ST. SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Telephone YUkon 1894 

Central California Construction Company 

GENERAL CONTRACTORS 

116 ERIE STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Phone EXbrook 4898 — Res. ORinda 362 1 

E . J . LAND 

AUTHORIZED WATCH INSPECTOR FOR 
w, SOUTHERN PACIFIC CO.— WESTERN PACIFIC R. R. 

Watch Repairing with Care and Precision — Watches & Jewelry 
74> THIRD ST.. (Opp. Depot) SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Compliments of 

E. J. Willig Truck Transportation Co. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



565 BERRY STREET 



Phone Mission 7677 



COMMERCIAL TRUCK SERVICE 

CONTRACT HAULING 

2590 OAKDALE AVENUE SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



BUY WAR BONDS 
AND STAMPS 



Compliments of 

MARSHALL-NEWELL SUPPLY CO. 

SPEAR and MISSION STREETS SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



...ASK FOR... 

MONARCH FINER FOODS 

Sold by 
RETAIL GROCERS FROM COAST TO COAST 



Lou E. Probst, Stale Mgr. Phone CArfield 06 7! 



INDEPENDENT ORDER OF FORESTERS 



170 VALENCIA STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



SAMUEL S. PERRY 

World-wide Importations Since 1924 

535 MISSION STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Compliments of 

CASWELL COFFEE CO. 



642 HARRISON STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Compliments of 

INCANDESCENT SUPPLY CO. 



547 MISSION STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Bill Rogers 

CLUB VANDERBILT 

225 MASON STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Phone TUxedo 9635 

T. L. M. O. CLUB 

620 OFARRELL ST. SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Compliments of 

GRISON'S CHICKEN HOUSE 

2050 VAN NESS AVENUE SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Greetings to San Francisco Police 



JOE LEWIS 



19th HOLE DE LUXE 



i\0? CLEMENT STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Compliments 

WILLIAMS WALLACE CO. 

160 HOOPER STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



A. M. GELBUL 8C CO. 



704 MARKET STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



SUNSHINE CURTAINS 

Manufacturers 
CURTAINS STYLED FOR THE PACIFIC COAST 



740 MISSION STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Page 28 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



August, 194 J 



Hillsborough — Chief W. J. Wisnom, City Manager 
Earl P. Wilsey. 

San Bruno — Chief Bill Maher, Councilman Carl W. 
Hultberg. 

San Carlos — Mayor Al. H. Sagehorn, Chief Edward J. 
Wheeler, Police Commissioner Edward R. Burton. 

Oakland — Chief Robert Tracy, Captain of Inspectors 
H. F. Radbruch, Deputy Sheriffs John Greening and Wm. 

D. Terry, Harry Kelley and Thos. H. Keating of Moore's 
Ship Yards, Harold J. Cotton and Jerome J. Higgins of the 
State Bureau of Patrol. 

Alameda — Former Mayor Wm. F. Murray. 

Los Gatos— Chief R. M. Phillips, former Chief L. L, 
Feathers, Constable E. O. Woods. 

South San Francisco — Louis Belloni. 

Berkeley — Chief J. D. Holstrom and Officer Walter 
J. Johnson. 

Palo Alto— Chief H. A. Zink, Sergeant R. D. Fletcher. 

San Rafael— Chief Frank Kelly, Sheriff Walter Sell- 
mer. Councilman Perry, Captain Emory L. Dawson, 
C. H. P. 

Larkspur — Judge John Flor, O. R. Jensen. 

Richmond — Chief L. E. Jones. 

Piedmont — Chief William Pflaum. 

Washington, D. C— U. S. Custom Officers J. F. Oneill, 
K. G. Linden. 

San Anselmo — Chief Donald T. Wood, Harry Butler, 
editor Herald. 

San Francisco — Chief Charles W. Dullea, Captain of 
Inspectors Benard J. McDonald, Director George Hip- 
pely. Director James English, Criminologist Frank La- 
Tulipe, Sheriff Daniel Murphy, Former Police Commis- 
sioner Ward G. Dalkup, Lt. Col. Steele, Captain W. P. 
Als, and Captain Robert McKnight, U. S. Army Provost 
Marshal's Office; Captain H. L. Knowles, Intelligence 
Office, Fort Mason; Lieut. Kenneth W. Woolsey, U. S. 
Army; Nat Pieper, Harry VanPelt and John D. Sullivan, 
F.B.I. ; W. E. Schoppe and "Jimmy" Britt, National Auto 
Theft Bureau. Dan O'Connell, War Shipping Board; 
Chief D. Hayden and Herbert Schroeder, Pacific Tele- 
phone Co.; Chief Ed. C. Wood, Pacific Gas and Electric 
Co.; G. W. Kavaney, M. V. O'Hearn and C. E. Stoops, 
State Patrol Bureau; Al Helgoe, American Hawaiian 
Steamship Co.; Wm. P. Golden, C. R. Bricca, James A, 
Murphy, Dr. Leo. J. McMahon, J. C. Meinbriss, Pinker- 
ton's; Attorney Lloyd Cosgrove, Royal E. Handlos, Phillip 

E. Geauque, Robert H. Morse, W. M. Tener, United Air 
Lines; H. D. Lowe, War Council; Elmer G. Johnson, 
Harvey Crane, Jimmy Schmidt, Fred Murphy and A. 
Kilkeary, Fire Department; Milton Philashy, Allied In- 
vestigating Bureau; F. H. Gardner, Customs Agent; C. R. 
Danielson, Albert Rhine, Rex Leslie and Opie L. Warner. 




Bus. Phone DOuglas 5068 Res. Phone PRospect 8661 

HAPPY'S 

FRED LORENZETTl 

WINES AND LIQUORS 

73 1 COLUMBUS AVE. SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Sales Dept. — Phones G.Arfield 2057 — 2058 



John Sabini, Rep. 



SONOMA MISSION CREAMY, LTD. 

Manufacturers of 
"VALLEY-OF-THE-MOON" DAIRY PRODUCTS 

143 5 STOCKTON ST. S.AN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

Phone CArfield l<»52 Adele Prele. L. Dal Poggetto, Props. 

PANAMA CANAL RAVIOLI FACTORY 

RAVIOLI AND TAGLIARINI FRESH EVERY DAY 

We Sell For Less — And Quality, Too 
1358 GRANT AVE.. Cor. Green St. SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Telephone ORdway 4049 

PAUL KATZ 

SPECIALIZING IN UNIFORMS FOR LADIES 
466 GEARY ST. SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Phone EXbrook 4905 John Vander Laan 

VANDER LAAN PILING 8C LUMBER CO. 

2 16 PINE STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

Compliments of 

WILLIAM F. DWYER, M. D. 



3 50 POST STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Phone EXbrook 4862 

G A RT N E R 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

171 SECOND STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

EXbrook 8143 

FRANK KARP 

MANUFACTURING JEWELER 
Diamonds - Watches - Jewelry 

133 KEARNY ST.. ROOM 201 SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Telephone GAfield 44 17 

BROEMMEL'S PHARMACEUTICALS 

384 POST STREET. Fitzhugh Bldg. SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



JOHNSON LOCKE MERCANTILE CO. 



64 PINE STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



ATwaler 5672 

MOLLY'S CREAMERY 

FOUNTAIN SERVICE AND SANDWICHES 
BULK ICE CREAM 

1547 GUERRERO ST. SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

GArfield 9903 M. B. McDonough 

MAC'S PASTIME 

STEAKS — SHORT ORDERS — DRINKS 

Checks Cashed 
82 EMBARCADERO. Half Block from Ferry SAN FRANCISCO 

UNITED LUGGAGE 

846 MARKET STREET 

FINMAN'S LUGGAGE 

1072 MARKET STREET 
Telephone HEmlock 53 53 

A. E. HEFFNER TAILORING CO. 



2 109 MARKET STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



WALTER COLE 8c CO. 



500 ADELINE STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



August, 1945' 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 29 



SOME ARE "TRUE" AND SOME 
ARE "FALSE" 

(Continued from Page 16) 

45. First degree burglary can be committed in the day 
time, only if the person so doing is armed with a deadly 
weapon or so arms himself while in the commission of the 
burglary, or assaults any person while committing said bur- 
glary. 

46. Committed in the night time, a burglary of a dwell- 
ing house, might, under certain circumstances, be only a 
second degree burglary. 

47. The jury must reach a verdict on a case submitted 
to them before they can be legally discharged. 

48. A coroner's jury must, as a minimum, have nine 
jurors. 

49. There can be only one inquest on any one (dead) 
body. 

50. One of the principal uses of a so-called "Traffic 
Flow Map" is to show whether additional traffic patrol- 
men may be required or there is need of additional traffic 
lights. 

51. Each party must prove his own affirmative allega- 
tions. 

Telephone EXbrook 7745 

SCANDIA COMMERCIAL CO. 

IMPORTED AND DOMESTIC DELICACIES 

27-29 DRUMM STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

Phone CHina 1633 



Phone CArfield 3754 

PIEMONTE HOTEL 

WHERE GOOD FRIENDS MEET 
752 VALLEJO ST. SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

DOuglas I 153 Irene BuIIo, Proprietress 

BIMBO'5 

ITALIAN DINNERS — CRAB CIOPPINO 

2295-2299 POWELL STREET— 301 BAY ST. 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Telephone CArfield 93 18 

ALFRED AND SECONDO 

PURVEYORS OF TASTY FOODS & PALATABLE DRINKS 

885 BROADWA'I' SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Open 3 P.M. 'til 2 in the Morning, except Monday 

"EL JACALITO" 

The Most Typical Restaurant — Good Food, Service a la Carte 

GENUINE MEXICAN DINNERS 

Mason cable car at the door, MASON & BROADWAY, S. F. 



Phone SUtter 9948 



Cuido Poletti 



TITO'S CIGAR STORE 

CIGARS — CIGARETTES — CANDY — MAGAZINES 

1433 STOCKTON ST. SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



DOuglas 9939 



Ralph( Rivers) Lozano 



622 CLUB 

COCKTAILS 

The Bright Spot of Green Street 



622 GREEN STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Phone EXbrook 5 766 



u 



CAFE 



Marino and Pearl, Props. 
1371 GRANT AVE. SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Hubert Lew, Prop. Phone EXbrook 0742 



MONTGOMERY GARAGE 

General Auto Repairs, Greasing, Washing, Battery Charging 

Day and Night Service 
328 JACKSON STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Compliments of a Friend 



G. B. TORRE & SONS 

Dealers in BOTTLES, SACKS, ETC., SANITARY WIPING RAGS 

105-117 BAY STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Phone SUtter 93 16 



G. Lombardi, A. Simoni, B. Manfredi 



BUY WAR BONDS 



NORTH BEACH CAFE 

WINES— LIQUORS and BEER 
15 12 STOCKTON ST. SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



TEmplebar 3020 



Phone CArfield 8467 



Mary S. Arietta, Prop. 



HUBBARD AUTO PARTS 

NEW PARTS FOR OLD CARS 



MARY'S INN 

SELECTED WINES AND BEERS 



2618 TELEGRAPH AVENUE 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



528 GREEN ST. 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Phone HIgate 8001 Architects' and Engineers* Supplies 

EAST BAY BLUE PRINT and SUPPLY CO. 

Authorized Distributor for KEUFFEL & ESSER CO., of New York 

BLUE PRINTING - PHOTOSTATING 
1723 FRANKLIN STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone EXbrook 95 11 

BLACK CAT CAFE 

"THE SEACOAST OF BOHEMIA 
Au Chat Noir 

710 MONTGOMERY ST. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



TWinoaks 2727 



ABE COHN 

WHOLESALE BEVERAGES 



363 SECOND STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Telephone EXbrook 7544 

M. CAFFERATA 

TORTELLINI — RAVIOLI — TAGLIARINI 
IMPORTED AND DOMESTIC GROCERIES 

700 COLUMBUS .^VE., Cor. Filbert St. SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Phones: Office GLencourt 1 140 - Res. ANdover 6565 

Basil L. Smout Western Casket Company 



Telephone WEst 2 171 



J. Cazenave, C. Mirossou 



YERBA BUENA FRENCH LAUNDRY 



ALL WORK DONE BY HAND 



3300 BROADWAY 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



2 157 LOMBARD ST. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Phone KEllog 2-9126 William Tama, Mgr. 

BETTER SERVICE 

CLEANING AND DYEING 
Quality Work - We Call and Deliver 

1926 23rd AVENUE OAKLAND. CALIF. 

Phone TEmplebar 8139 If No Answer Call OLympic 5482 

OAKLAND CASKET COMPANY 



QUALITY 

2842 ADELINE STREET 



SERVICE 



Phone EXbrook 492 7 C. Santini, Prop. 

NEW EXPOSITION CAFE 

LIQUORS, WINES AND BEER 

532 GREEN ST. SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Phone GLencourt 9140 L. M. Cakebread 

CAKEBREAD'S GARAGE - 

AUTOMATIC SERVICE OF ALL KINDS 
Official Brake Station - Body and Fender Repairs 

OAKLAND, CALIF. 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 803 EAST 12th STREET 



Page 30 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



August, 1945 



II 



1908^^ Police Officers Class Hold Banquet 



On July 1, 1908, 11 young men were sworn in as mem- 
bers of the San Francisco Police Department. They were: 

George D. Bailey, Charles H. Bates, George W. Clark, 
Michael J. Coleman, Fred J. Collins, Peter J. Collins, Hugh 
H. Connor, Relfe DeBardelaben, Chester Diestel, Hugo 
Dietel, Robert Dower, Horace S. Drury, Daniel J. Enright, 
John F. Floyd, Elmer E. Fugit, Charles J. Gallatin, August 
J. Harry, Joseph E. Holmes, Thomas E.. Hurley, Henry 
C. Jagger, Harvey E. Johnston, Sylvan G. Lowenherg, 
Samuel Miller, Allan G. Moran, Joseph J. McTernan, 
Thomas F. Naughton, Francis J. O'Donnell, James O'Don- 
nell, Otto Pyrit;, John J. Quinlan, John Regallo, Henry A. 
Reilly, Harry A. Rose, George H. Ryan, Peter Smith, 
George Stallard and Frank Tracey. 

Back in July 1, 192i, the survivors of this list of officers, 
who have all served so well in the duties they assumed 
when they donned the stars of their calling, gathered for 
a banquet in Al Ramazzoti's Commercial Cafe down at 
22 nd and Merchant Street. It was decided that such meet- 
ings were to be repeated each iive years thereafter on July 
1st. In 1930 and 19.^5 the meetings were held in the Mark 
Hopkins hotel. In 1940 the boys who remained out of this 
big group had a gathering at the Mark, that included their 
wives and a gala time was enjoyed by one and all. 

On July 1 of this year the boys gathered at Ramazotti's 
cafe which has moved to Sansome near Broadway, now 
known as Mi Rendezvous, and ten of the original 37 ap- 
peared for this year's celebration. Lieutenant Reilly was 
chairman of the event, and he recounted the history of 
that class of police officers, and read the list of those who 
have passed on, and at the end of his speech those in at- 
tendance rose and stood in silence as a memorial tribute 
to their dead brothers. 

Those attending this year's observance were : 

George Bailey, retired; Sergeant Michael Coleman, 
Officer Hugo Dietel, Joseph E. Holmes, retired; Henry 
C. Jagger, retired; H. E. Johnson, retired; Lieutenant 
Samuel Miller, Allen G. Moran, retired; Otto H. Pyritz, 
retired; John Regallo, retired; Lieutenant Reilly, and 
Opie L. Warner, honorary member of the organization. 

Inspectors Charles J. Gallatin and George Stallard of 
the Pawnshop Detail, two of the only others now in active 
service, were unable to be present. 

Those of the class who have answered the last roll call 



moving iigure in the Mission Kiwanis Club, presented 
Lieutenant Reilly with a bottle of champagne to be opened 
by the last two survivors of the Class of 1908. The bottle 
his been properly deposited for this event. 

Host Ramazzoti went all-out in furnishing a wide va- 
riety of choice foods and the proper refreshments. 

The meeting adjourned until July 1, 1946. 



MICK KYRIOS 

GOOD MEALS 
From 6 A. M. to 6 P. M. 



461 ELEVENTH ST. 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Hlgate 9340 

JUNE'S GROCERY 

GROCERIES — COLD MEATS — BEER & WINE 

165 1 FOURTEENTH ST. OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Telephone Hlgate 4016 

CALIFORNIA RECREATION CO. 

BOWLING AND BILLIARDS 

Fourteen Alleys — Catering to Ladies and Beginners 

Twenty Tables — Pocket, Carom, Snooker 

15 15 San Pablo Avenue — 52 7 Sixteenth Street OAKLAND 

SCOTTY'S PONY MARKETS 

U. S. Government-Inspected Horse Meat for Human Consumption 
Five Convenient Stores — 607 Washington, 3329 Lakeshore and 5914 
MacArthur, Oakland; 3 171 College, Berk.; 8th & Barrett. Richmond 

Seattle, Tacoma. Portland, Los Angeles, San Diego. Las Vegas 

MILLS SALES COMPANY 

AUTOMATIC MERCHANDISING MACHINES 

Telephone Hlgate 0230 

1640 )8th STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 

CARNATION COMPANY 

FRESH MILK AND ICE CREAM 



Charles H. Bates, George W. Clark, Fred J. Collins, 
Peter J. Collins, Hugh H. Connor, Robert Dower, Horace 
S. Drury, John F. Floyd, August J. Harry, S. G. Lowen- 
berg, Thomas F. Naughton, Francis J. O'Donnell, James 
O'Donnell, Harr>' A. Ross, George H. Ryan and Peter 
Smith. 

It was decided at this meeting that the surviving mem- 
bers would meet annually from now on, and the next 
meeting will probably be graced by the womenfolk of the 
members. 

Mel Carr of the Muther Wine Company, 131, and a 



Mth AND DIVISION 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Piedmont 5960 



SILVA & JIMMY EVANS LIQUORS 



3212 COLLEGE AVE. 



BERKELEY, CALIF. 



Phone ANdover 1688 

L. F. WITHARM 

Sheet Metal and Heating - Coal, Oil, Gas Furnaces 
1718 EAST 12th STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 



August. 194^ POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL Page 31 j 



Telephone: Hlgate 9 116 Hlgate 2587 

JOHN'S HALF BARREL TIVOLI LUNCH 

CHOICE LIQUOR OF ALL KINDS FINE WINES AND BEER 

JAMES SANTRIZOS. Proprietor ^^ „ „, „, . ...„,, „ , 

The Best — Plenty Of It — And Ice Cold — Sandwiches 

1003 BROADWAY OAKLAND 7. CALIF. 468 TENTH STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Hlgate 9908 Telephone TEmplebar 6997 

ADELINE SEVEN C. ZUNINO MACHINE WORKS 

IMPROVEMENTS AND REPAIR WORK 

G. A. & D. E. FERRY, Props. „ . j .. , , o . . .. ■_ 

Uestgners and Manufacturers of Special Machinery 

115 1 SEVENTH ST. OAKLAND, CALIF. 1678 SIXTEENTH ST. OAKLAND, CALIF. 



TEmplebar 9649 Lonzie Byrd, Prop. Telephone Hlgate 9934 We Serve the Best 

CHICKEN ROOST STATE GRILL 

CHICKEN DINNERS— COLD BEER— MUSIC SPECIAL LUNCHES AND DINNERS 

"Where Friends Meet Til 2 A. M." Private Booths for Ladies 

903 FRANKLIN ST. OAKLAND, CALIF. 534 TENTH St., Bet. Clay & VX'ashington OAKLAND, CALIF 



CORREGIDOR TAVERN 

WINE — BEER 
SANDWICHES & LUNCH 

807 FRANKLIN ST. OAKLAND. CALIF. 



MARY VIERRA TAVERN 

Good Service — All Kinds of Liquors 

905 SEVENTH ST. OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone: GLencourt 8238 

NEW YORK CAFE 

CHOP SUEY, CHOW MEIN, NOODLES & AMERICAN DISHES 

919 BROADWAY OAKLAND, CALIF. 

TEmplebar 8298 HARRY, Prop. 



HARRY'S PLACE 



823 BROADWAY OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Telephone Hlgate 9235 Buzz Landi. Jim Tobin 



PEARL HARBOR CAFE MADISON SQUARE 



JUST A GOOD PLACE TO DRINK 

5 17 ELEVENTH ST. OAKLAND, CALIF. 



700 ADELINE STREET 
PEARL HARBOR LIQUOR STORE 

Off Sale Liquor Store i 136 SEVENTH ST., OAKLAND 

Phone GLencourt 0122 

Hlgate 9326 Rudy Hersh. Prop. 

SLIM JENKINS RUDY'S VIRGINIA CLUB 

GOOD FOOD-BETTER ENTERTAINMENT j„,, ^ Little Southern Hospitality 

Featuring Baked Ham— Fried Chicken— Steaks Finest of BEERS— WINES— LIQUORS— MIXED DRINKS 

1748 SEVENTH STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 723 BROADWAY OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Hlgate 3277 

Phone TEmplebar 9483 

NEW LIFE GROCERY ^^^^ SHEAN'S PLACE 

WINE — BEER 
BEER — WINE 

We Serve Meals at All Times 

1480 FOURTEENTH ST. OAKLAND, CALIF. 1000 JEFFERSON ST. OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone YUkon 193 1 Phone EXbrook 3489 — 4968 Mike Anslemi 

MONTEREY CHEESE CO. UNITED MELON DISTRIBUTORS 

DISTRIBUTORS OF FANCY CHEESE WATERMELONS - CASABAS - PERSIAN 

Distributors of Tomales Bay Brand Cheese BANANAS - HUBBARD SQUASH 

244 JACKSON STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 3 16-318 DRUMM ST.— 400 FRONT ST. SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Page 32 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



August, 1945 



IDENTIFICATION OFFICERS MEET 

A new group of law enforcement officers has recently 
been holding monthly meetings in the Bay Area, This 
group, tentatively known as the Bay Counties' Identifica- 
tion Officers" Association has a membership of forty-two 
which is drawn from an area radiating approximately sixty 
miles from the hub of San Francisco. 

The organization was formed to promote closer co-opera- 
tion in the work of identification, the exchange of ideas, 
and to foster better acquaintance and good fellowship, at 
the same time following the general design of the rules 
and regulations of the parent organization, the California 
Division of the International Association For Identifica- 
tion. Particular credit is due Lieutenant Walter Hawkin- 
son of the Oakland Police Department Bureau of Identi- 
fication for his interest and his efforts in first conceiving 
the idea of forming such an organisation and, secondly, in 
sponsoring its first meeting in Oakland, California. 

The group meets informally each month at a location 
selected by invitation from one of the members who acts 
as host and chairman for the occasion and who is respon- 
sible for the conduct of a program for the evening. 

The last meeting was held in San Quentin Prison, with 
Ward Estelle and Jack Brennan acting as co-chairmen. 
The attendance on this occasion was in excess of seventy 
— the Chiefs of Police of organizations representatives hav- 
ing been invited to attend as guests. 

During dinner they were entertained by the San Quen- 
tin Band and Glee Club after which the host. Warden 
Duffy, very interestingly told of the efforts and the prog- 
ress that was being made in the rehabilitation of the pris- 
oners. Prior to the dinner, the guests were escorted on a 
tour of the prison. 

The next meeting will be held on August 20, at 6:00 
p.m., at the Pacheco Hotel, Pacheco, with Lester J. Bower 
acting as host. At 'i : 1 5 p.m. those who so desire will be 
conducted on a tour of the new County Jail at Martinez. 

Attending were : Kenneth F. Jordan, San Jose Police De- 
partment; Ray L. Stoffels and Lester J. Bower, Contra 
Costa Sheriff's Office; Dale D. Atwood, Palo Alto Police 
Dept.; Fred Harnden, Alameda County Sheriff's Office- 
Lt. R. T. "Bob" Sherry, Berkeley Police; B. C. "Bert" 
Bridges, Alameda Police Dept.; Lt. Timothy Burke and 
Frank LaTulipe and Jack Ross, San Francisco Police; Ser- 
geant John Virango, Albany Police Dept.; Jack Doyle, 
Assistant Chief Emeryville Police; Edward R. Couch, 
Benicia Police Dept.; Inspector Chas. M. Clawson, Pitts- 
burg Police Dept.; George Ackerman, Antioch Police 
Dept.; Robert Mandeville, Antioch Police Dept.; George 
Wildes, Pittsburg Police Dept.; Edward Motta. San Lean- 
dro Police Dept.; Leavitt Baker, Jr., San Rafael Sheriff's 
Office; W. A. "Bill" Snare, Marinship, Sausalito; Ser- 
geant Frank B. French, Sausalito Police Dept.; Harry L. 
Oliver, 'Vallejo Police Dept.; Everett Chamberlain, Vallejo 
Police Dept.; Willard Smith, Richmond Police Dept.; 
Thomas Keating, Moore Dr>' Dock Co., Oakland; Chief 
Deputy June O. Pritchard, Sheriff's O&ce. Fairfield; Wal- 
ter Hawkinson, Oakland Police; and the following Patrol- 
men from Oakland Police Dept, : Sid Brown, Cad Cham- 



bon, Tom Cooney, John E, Davis, Robert Donnell, Frank 
Fiala, Arthur J, Hendricks, George E, Johnston, Earl 
Rumetsch, William Sowersby, Magner Thompson, Harold 
G, Wright; Eugene Noel, Berkeley Police Dept.; Capt, 
Jesse Jackson, New Service Div,, Police Dept. Oakland. 

Phone KEllogg 2-1833 



ED'S AUTO PARTS 



OAKLAND, CALIF, 



Phone TWinoaks 3866 



Ride a Bike for Health's Sake 



HANK AND FRANK 

East Bay's Leading Bicycle Academy 
For Fun and Economy . . . Ride a Bike Around Beautiful Lake Merritt 



1267 FIRST AVENUE 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



ST. JAMES RESTAURANT 



233 CALIFORNIA STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Tel. DElaware 0740 



HAIGHT'S ASSOCIATED SERVICE 

Prewar Service — Washing, Polishing, Lubrication, Tires, Accessories 
Complete Auto Service 



MISSION & SCHOOL STS. 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Res. Ph. DElaware 3071 



Ranch Ph. R.Andoiph 0446 



P. CAFFERATA & CO. 

Growers and Dealers in All Kinds of Vegetables 



Colombo Market. 6IS Front St. 
GArfield 9998 



Stalls 86-87 Clark St. 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Phone Hlgate 9335 



Dave Brandt 



BON TON BUFFET 

AND LIQUOR STORE 
NOW SERVING DINNERS 



r9.|8l GRAND AVE., bet. Webster & Harrison, OAKLAND, CAL. 
Phone GLencourt 1218 



DURANT PLUMBING 

Plumbing - Heating - General Jobbing - Estimates Furnished 



1012 WEBSTER STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone GLencourt 686 1 



HOGAN LUMBER CO. 

Wholesale and Retail — Quality Service — Insulating, Plywood, 

Roofing Mater*al, Lumber and Mill Products Since 18SS 

Millwork - Sash Doors 



SECOND AND ALICE STS, 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



August, 1945- POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL Page 33 



PODESTA & BALDOCCHI National Wooden Box Association 

FLORISTS 

224-226 GRANT AVE. SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 53 NEW MONTGOMERY STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



Compliments of _, _ ooc/i 

Phone WEst 9856 

S & J MARTY 

CIVIC CENTER HOTEL — 20 12th STREET 

ELM HOTEL— 354 EDDY Famous Concy Island Sandwich Shop 

CHASE HOTEL — 12 78 MARKET 

All in Downtown San Francisco 

2077 CHESTNUT STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



iivij uii ^Ati. cr <" NT . Phone RAndolph 1046 Wm. J. Strahm 

UNderhill 6426 E. C. Norton ^ ^ 

WALLER GARAGE STRAHM MOTORS 

GAS-OIL-AUTO REPAIRING AND SERVICING GENERAL AUTOMOBILE REPAIRING 

370 WALLER ST. SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 4420 MISSION STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Phone RAndolph 9680 B. D. De Wayne 



VICTOR CI I JR '''^'' '° '"^^ ^^^''y - Closea Monday 

DE WAYNE CACTUS GARDENS 

RARE CACTI and SUCCULENTS 
Collectors Specimens - Retail, Wholesale 

283 THIRD STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



1340 BAYSHORE BLVD. SAN FRANCISCO 



Phones: MArket 5300 - 3301 -n. ^. ^ ,, ta\» o i d n -ru- m- n- u* ■ \n 

Phone GArneld 6814 Paul Pagni C. 1 hiery Illio Giachim, Mgr. 

OSTLUND & JOHNSON 

•' ST. JULIEN RESTAURANT 

Manufacturers and Contractors 

NOON LUNCH - COCKTAIL LOUNGE 
BANK, STORE and OFFICE FIXTURES 

De Luxe Evening Dinners - Also A La Carte Service 

1901-05 BRYANT ST. SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

140 BATTERY STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



LAWRENCE WAREHOUSE CO. 

FIELD WAREHOUSE UNION ICE COMPANY 

37 DRUMM STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



GREENWOOD-RAGGIO & CO. ttxttt^ct^ T^Ar^Tcrr^ txtct m a xrr^c t-r^ 

UNITED PACIFIC INSURANCE CO. 

Home Office: Tacoma, Washington 

1501 RUSS BUILDING SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

206 SANSOME STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



Tel. EXbrook 0064 Cable Address "Havisideco" 



Phone Mission 9346 

HAVISIDE COMPANY 

Established 18/1 
Salvage and Derrick Barges — Ship Chandlers — Sail Makers SODA FOUNTAIN LUNCH 

Ship Riggers GROCERIES - DELICATESSEN - BEER - WINE 

40 SPEAR STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 2640 24th STREET, cor. Potrero Ave. SAN FRANCISCO 



Telephone CArfield 3613 George Niven Syl. Sarrat SUtter6185 SKyline6959 F. Del Grande 

NIVEN 8i SARRAT COMMISSION BOX COMPANY 

WHOLESALE FLORISTS NEW and SECOND HAND BOXES and CRATES 

Growers - Shippers — Orchids - Gardenias ouiddcdc rvn- r-ADi r>Ar. i <-.tc 

Bay Area Distributors Marin Ant Cups SHIPPERS OF CARLOAD LOTS 

195 FIFTH STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF, 610 FRONT ST.— 117 CLARK STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Page 34 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



August, 194? 



S.F.P.D. CLICKS DURING U.N.C.I.O. 

(Continued from Page 5 ) 
all carr>' away with us an enduring memor>' of this beau- 
tiful city and of its generous people who have done so 
much to add to the pleasure of our stay. I would like to 
add a special message of thanks to the Police, whose cour- 
tesy has been as unfailing as their efficiency. 
Lord Halifax 
United Kingdom Delegation 
San Francisco Conference." 

From Fairmont Hotel . . . 

"I want to take this opportunity of thanking you for the 
manner in which you handled the crowds and kept order 
in and about the Hotel Fairmont during the President's 
visit here. I have never seen any crowds handled with so 
httle confusion and excitement as during the past twenty 
four hours. I certainly want to tell you what a wonderful 
job you and your officers have done here. 

F.MRMONT Hotel Company, 

Benj. H. Swig, Pres." 
* * * 

Attorney-General Robert Kenny . . . 

"Your handling of the difficult police problems in con- 
nection with the World Conference was superb. 

"I know the intelligence and the planning that you put 
into this vital task, and I also know of the skillful aptitude 
of your staff entrusted with this important detail. 

"With the eyes of the world on San Francisco during 
that period, carelessness or awkwardness in the responsibil- 
ity would have been very noticeable. The magnificent way 
in which your security problem was administered is surely 
a model to go by for all such significant events. 

"In conveying my admiration and congratulations to you 
for outstanding achievement, I would like also if my senti- 
ments were made known to your capable assistants. Cali- 
fornia is proud of the performance of the San Francisco 
Police Department, and it has made its efficiency known 
among every member of the United Nations Conference 
on International Organization. 

Robert W. Kenny, 
Attorney General, 
State of California, 
Department of Justice." 

Phone HIgate 192 7 



DUCHESS SANDWICH COMPANY 



2403-03 GROVE STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Andy NX'ong Presents 



( ( 



THE DRUNKARD" 



Nightly 8:30 (Excepting .Monday) 

GREEN STREET MUSIC HALL 

GREEN AT STOCKTON ST. SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

Phone V'Alencia 3 74 7 

Your Best Bet Is — 

SEABISCUIT LIQUOR STORE 

WINE— BEER— LIQUORS 

3 10 BAYSHORE BOULEVARD SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

JAS. J. GARTLAND 

SUPERVISOR 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 
DOuglas 2 182 

LILLI ANN CO. 

COSTUMES 



973 MARKET STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



FEDERAL MOGUL CORP. 



250 14th STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Compliments of 



D A S C O 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone EXbrook 7380 New Construction: Mariposa Street Plant 

MARTINOLICH SHIPBUILDING CO. 

DESIGNERS - BUILDERS - REPAIRERS 

Five Marine Railways - Pier 52. Plant 



PIER 52 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Compliments of 



Phone HEmlock 9264 



For Over 25 Years The Best 



DINWIDDIE CONSTRUCTION CO. 



RENON BAKING COMPANY 

UP-TO-DATE and SANITARY - QUALITY - SERVICE 



1330 HOWARD STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



Telephone EXbrook 75 44 

M. CAFFERATA 

TORTELLINl - RAVIOLI - TAGLIARINI 

Imported and Domestic Groceries 

700 COLUMBUS AVE. SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



il 



August, 194? 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 35 



GRaystone 4010 



SPEED'S LIQUOR STORE 

GREG & BEN 



Western Piping 8C Engineering Co. 



912 GEARY STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 119 KANSAS ST. 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



LUCKY STRIKE 



MEANS FINE TOBACCO 



Phone SUtter 5 743 R. P. Giovannoni W. G. Giovannoni 

GIOVANNONI BROTHERS 

Wholesale Produce Dealers 
Specialties: Fancy Potatoes, Onions and Garlic 



286 WASHINGTON STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



ALBERT PICARD 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



TECHNICAL FISHERIES CO. 



1332 EVANS AVENUE 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Phone SUtter 0475 



CHAUFFEURS' SOCIAL CLUB 



3233 22nd STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Phone WAInut 4505 



Henry Van Randall, Prop. 



ONYX CAFE 

FINE FOOD OUR SPECIALTY 



1640 POST STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Phone YUkon 05 5 9 



IDENTIFICATION PHOTO SERVICE 

Identification Cards and Badges Sealed in Plastic - Passport and 

Application Photos - Copying and reducing discharges. Birth 

Certificates, etc., to wallet size and sealing them in plastic. 

Photo Print Copying 



SUBMARINE SIGNAL COMPANY 

BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 

86 BEALE STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF, 

BUY WAR BONDS 
AND STAMPS 



Phone KEUog 4-5010 



Jes B. Smyers 



JAY BEE GARAGE 

COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE 



FERRY BUILDING 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. i^q, FOOTHILL BLVD. 



OAKLAND, CALIF, 



Phone GArfield 7207 

Hough Patent Boiler Feed Checks — Lane Life Boat 

Walter Kidde & Co., Inc.; Rich Smoke Detecting System; Lux Fire 

Extinguishing System; Selex-Zonit Fire Detection System 

HOUGH & EGBERT CO. 

Sales Agents for Marine Equipment 



Compiiments of 

J. T. THORPE 8C SON, INC. 

FIRE BRICK CONTRACTORS 



311 CALIFORNIA STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



941 SIXTEENTH STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



MACNSON'S 




CONTRACTING ENGINEERS 

151-161 TEHAMA STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

Phone GArfield 3 195 Samuel Sao Marcos. Prop. 

NEW LISBON RESTAURANT 

66 JACKSON STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



^THE KEY-LUCK TO REALTV 



((§)? BROKERS TJ lii.Wifci jdP^ Im ^■■_. 



I^rMT,, 



2067 SUTTER ST. WEst 1100 SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

suiter 9602 Tony Nicoletti 

MARKET GRILL 

2 13 WASHINGTON STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Page 36 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



August, 1945 



THE GENESIS OF FINGERPRINTING 

( Continued from Page 9) 

sive references throughout both Testaments leave no room 
for doubt. Paul the Apostle signed his letters with his 
fingerprints. It is known that many of his texts were dic- 
tated, and in the sixteenth chapter of Romans, the twenty- 
second verse records assertions from his amanuensis: "I. 
Tertius, who wrote this epistle, salute you in the Lord.' 
However, Paul was graduated from the seat of his coun- 
try's academic learning, and by any standard, was a man 
of erudition. It is possible that his voluminous writings, 
perhaps together with defective eyesight, made a secre- 
tiLTy's aid acceptable. 

At any rate, Paul concluded his transcriptions with 
an incontestable autograph, his fingerprints. This import- 
ant fact is personally recorded by him in the third chapter 
of Second Thessalonians, wherein the seventeenth verse 
reads: 'The salutation of Paul, with mine ov.-n hand, 
which is the token in every epistle; so I write." And a 
somewhat freer translation of the ancient language gives 
this version: "My name, Paul, is written by my own hand, 
and my fingerprints are recorded upon every letter". Also 
in the sixteenth chapter of First Corinthians, the twenty- 
first verse reads; "The salutation of me, Paul, with mine 
own hand". 

In view of his educational background, this habit of 
the apostle would indicate that in those days, at least the 
better informed citizens had learned something of the actual 
science of skin markings; and it is clearly understood that 
even in Paul's time, the symbolic importance of hands and 
fingers had been a subject of common knowledge for many 
previous milleniums. 

Interesting indeed is verse nine from the thirteenth 
chapter of Exodus, which reads: "And it shall be for a 
sign unto thee upon thine hand . . .". And one of the 
most remarkable Bible recognitions of dermal indices is 
found in the forty-ninth chapter of Isaiah, the sixteenth 
verse: "Behold, I have graven thee upon the palms of my 
hands . . ." 

Harry A. Barbour 

RICHMOND SPORTS CENTER 

Bowlinsr . • • Billiards . . . Snack Bar . . Lounges 

llth and CUTTING BOULEVARD RICHMOND, CALIF. 



Phone Richmond 863 



Chas. Graves 



SPIERSCH BROTHERS 

Your Plumbers and Metal Workers Since 1902 
FURNACES, AUTOMATIC WATER HEATERS and CIRCULATORS 

Jobbing Properly Attended To - Estimates Given 



320 THIRTEENTH STREET 



RICHMOND. CALIF. 



Telephone DOuglas 9536 Max flc Joe Diaz 

When You Visit North Beach Don't Miss the Best 

CLUB BOHEMIOS 

TYPICAL MUSIC AND ENTERTAINMENT 
1216 STOCKTON STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



HOTEL LAKEPORT 



JOS. DUKE. Owner 



LAKEPORT 



C.JiLlFORNlA 



Pho 



■COMPLETE--!! 



Ceci & Ernie 



RAINBOW RESORT 



On Clear Lake, via Hopland Grade 

HORSES - CYCLING - BOATS - CABINS 

Wine and Dine by Candlelight 

LAKEPORT CALIFORNIA 

THE FINEST FOOD WITH DISTINCTIVE SERVICE 

YACHT CLUB CAFE 

FINE WINES, COCKTAILS AND LIQUORS 

Reservations Appreciated 
NICE and LAKEPORT. CUT-OFF 



THE SMOKE SHOP 

LAKEPORT. CALIFORNIA 
Specializing in Italian Dinners and American Cuisine 

MILAN CAFE 

FINEST OF DOMESTIC AND IMPORTED LIQUORS 
Ask for Al or Bill; they will give the Best 



LUCERNE. LAKE COUNTY 



CALIFORNIA 



MICKEY INN 



1449 FOURTEENTH ST. 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



HALF MOON CAFE 

HOME COOKING 
OPEN ONLY THREE HOURS A DAY 



1520 WOOD STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Carl Ahlberg, E. Lomfiecht 



FRANKLIN CAFE 



829 FRANKLIN ST. 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone G.Arfield 5263 F. Maggiora 

GLORIA SAUSAGE COMPANY 

IMPORTED GROCERIES — WHOLESALE & RETAIL 
Bet. Stockton St. fie Columbus Ave. 
635 VALLEJO ST. 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



August, 1945" 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 37 



DITTO SALES 8c SERVICE CO. 



681 MARKET STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



HIL VILLA TOURIST CAMP 

MODERN MOTOR APARTMENTS ' 

HUNTING - FISHING - SWIMMING ' 

PRIVATE TOILET AND SHOWERS 

Cabins $1.50 up 

I 
On Redwood Highway. 10 miles north of Willits j 



Phone 5 



W. K. McAllater - E. Loosley 



THE GRAY LINE, INC. 



RICHFIELD GARAGE 



GAS - OIL - AUTO REPAIRING - WELDING 



741 MARKET STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



GArfield 7823 



C. N. ROOS MAIN AND STATE STS. 



WILLITS, CALIF. 



SWIFT, LTD 



MEN'S WEAR 



TWO-EIGHTY POST STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



TOSCA CAFE 

"The Meeting Place of North Beach" 



AL'S REDWOOD CLUB 

Most Popular on the Redwood Highway 

AL GREENBERG, Prop. 



HOTEL WILLITS CORNER 



WILLITS, CALIF. 



Telephone Laytonville 1 



LAYTONVILLE GARAGE 

E. E. ELLIOTT 



312 COLUMBUS AVE 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Phone Richmond 700 



Mac & Ernie 



OWL-TAXI BILL CAB SERVICE 

MARSHALL T. WHITE - ALLEN A. KRELL 



RICHMOND 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone 12 



CARPENTER EQUIPMENT CO. 



950 NORTH STATE ST. 



UKIAH, CALIF. 



Phone Laytonville 8-F-4 

LONGVALE MERCANTILE STORE 

GAS, OIL, GROCERIES & U. S. POSTOFFICE 
Harvey & Vera Martin, Props. 

LAYTONVILLE. CALIF. 

SHANGRI-LA 

SPECIAL CHICKEN DINNERS 

ALL PASTRIES HOME MADE 

MODERN CABINS 

PRICES REASONABLE 
8 Miles North of Willits on Redwood Highway Rt. 2, WILLITS 



WILLOW SPRINGS AUTO COURT 



LAYTONVILLE. CALIF. 



Telephone 168 W. 



H. D. ROBERTS 

JEWELRY — HEARING AIDS 



106 WEST STANDLEY ST. 



UKIAH, CALIF. 



Phone: Sleepy Hollow Court 



Delicious Candies & Chocolates 



SLEEPY HOLLOW VILLAGE 

FOR A GOOD REST STAY WITH US 

NINA VOSSENKAUL — GEORGE TATARINOFF 

On Redwood Highway, 9 miles North of WILLITS. CALIFORNIA 
Phone 104 

PORTLOCK HARDWARE 

FULLER PAINTS - GENERAL HARDWARE 

PLUMBING & ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES 

SPORTING GOODS 

107 SOUTH STATE ST. UKIAH, CALIF. 

Phone 2-Y-l 1 

BIG OAK TAVERN 

LIQUORS - DINE - DANCE - GOOD TIME FOR ALL 

Meals At Reasonable Prices 

Where Everyone Meets 

CALPELLA, CALIF., ON 101 HIGHWAY 



SUtter 0262 



AUTO COURT and UNION "TS" SERVICE STATION 
CABINS — Prices Reasonable — Hot Water and Showers LEONE'S CAFE 

General Repairing. "The Best In Italian Cuisine" 

8 Miles North of Willits WILLITS. CALIF. 464 BROADWAY SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Page 38 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



August, 1945' 



LETTERS TO THE CHIEF 

('Continued from Page 19) 

O'Leary, Lloyd Peebles and Patrick Gleason. We were 
sorry that a previous engagement kept you from attending 
hut hope that you can be with us next year. 

Major Peter T. C.\rey, 
Physical Director." 
* * * 
"On behalf of the Mission Kiwanis Club, I wish to 
thank you and your staff for your attendance at our 
luncheon, I can assure you that the members appreciated 
Deputy Chief Riordan's remarks as well as your own and 
at any time the Mission Kiwanis Club can be of any serv- 
ice to Captain George M. Healy in his work with the Ju- 
venile Department, we will be glad to help you. 

M. S. Carr, Program Director, 
Mission Kiwanis Club." 



Phone UNderhill 0101 



Daniel Dee 



DEE ENGINEERING CO. 

FIRE BRICK CONTRACTORS 



170 HOOPER STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



HIgate 9554 



Mr. and Mrs. P. Mirande, Props. 



AZTEC HOTEL 

NICELY FURNISHED ROOMS 

Steam Heat, Hot and Cold Water in Every Room 

583 EIGH TH STREET OAKLA ND, CALIF. 

Phone TEmplebar 074 7 



Theodore Pappas, Prop. 



GREEK-AMERICAN GROCERY 

IMPORTED & DOMESTIC GROCERIES 

All Kinds of Liquors — Agency for Greek Newspapers & Ptg. 

489 EIGHTH STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone TEmplebar 0856 Lawn Mowers Sharpened 

STANDARD SAW WORKS 

General Saw Repair and Grinding Shop - Resaws - Narrow Band 

Saws Brazed, Set and Filed - Circular Saws Gummed, Retoothed. 

Swaged and Filed - Band and Circular Saws in Stock 

818.20 FRAN KLIN STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 

Phone KEllog 2-9722 

SCOTTY'S IDLE HOUR 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE 



310! EAST Mth STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone TWinoaks 2244 Sea Foods to Take Home 

For the Finest Sea Food Dinners Visit 



FISHERMAN'S PIER 



OAKLAND SEA FOOD GROTTO 

Cocktail Lounge — We Cater to Banquets 

FOOT OF FRANKLIN ST, OAKLAND, CALIF. 



HIgate 9939 



Frank Silva 



COURT CAFE 

FINE LIQUORS 



502 WASHINGTON STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF, 



TEmplebar 9503 

OAKLAND CHOICE MARKET 



718-20 WASHINGTON STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone GLencourt 02 9 S 

WILSON AUTO LAUNDRY 

STEAM CLEANING — MOTOR, CHASSIS 

321 TENTH STREET OAKLAND, CALIF 

Phone Piedmont 0133 Formerly Brower Pharmacy 

MULLEN'S 

PRESCRIPTION PHARMACY 

40th and BROADWAY OAKLAND, CALIF. 



THE ALAMEDA EXCHANGE 



BAyview 4591 

BENJAMIN EDLIN REALTY CORP. 



2448 CLEMENT STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Phone GArfield 14 76 

THE VON HAMM-COMPANY, LTD. 

CAPITAL AND SURPLUS, OVER $3,000,000.00 

215 MARKET STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF, 



Phone PRospect 6300 



C. L. D'.Albert - Al Malpas 



AMBASSADOR HOTEL 

200 CAR DRIVE-IN GARAGE 
55 MASON AT EDD'l' STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

DOuglas 5 122 

COOK & HARMS 

Manufacturers Agents and Brokers 
FOOD PRODUCTS 

268 MARKET STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

Phone Mission 4970 

SMITH MARKET 



900 22nd STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Phone HEmlock 072 1 



ALEMITE CO. OF NORTHERN CALIF. 



601 TURK STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Phon? UNderhill 4824 



L. RIZNIK & CO. 



UNIFORMS 

171 GROVE St.. at Van Ness, Opp. City Hall 



SAN FRANCISCO 



General Potato and Onion Distributors, Ltd. 

2 16 DRUMM STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



200 CLUB 



THIRD and HOWARD STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF, 



Phone Mission 0236 LOUIS A. CERNHARDT 

GERNHARDT-STROHMAIER CO. 

STOVES and STOVE REPAIRS 

Refrigerators, Washing Machines, Ironers, Water Heaters, 

Room Heaters, Linoleum 

MISSION STREET. Corner I8lh STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



HUNKEN'S ELK MARKET 

1183 OFARR ELL STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Phone YUkon 23 14 

GERMAIN SEED AND PLANT CO. 



5 1 7 DAVIS STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



9 MARKET STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



CALDWELL DRESS MFG. CO. 

For Sale in All Important Bay Area Stores — Ask For Them 

Boost San Francisco Pay Rolls 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

EXbrook 4091 

DAVIS FURNITURE CO. 

COMPLETE HOME FURNISHERS 

UPHOLSTERY MANUFACTURERS 

855 MISSION STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



August, 1945 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 39 



Dine and Dance at . . . 

ED'S BUNGALOW 

Specializing in Fine Italian Dinners and American Dishes 

BEER - WINE - LIQUORS 

CLEARLAKE OAKS. Lake County CALIFORNIA 



Telephone GArfield 77 18 

FLORENCE RAVIOLI FACTORY 

FRESH RAVIOLI, TAGLIARINI & TORTELLINI DAILY 
Imported and Domestic Groceries 

14 12 STOCKTON STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



ACME INN 

DRINKS YOU LIKE - DINING - DANCING 



DOYLE'S INN 



CLEARLAKE HIGHLANDS. Lake County 



CALIFORNIA 24th AT CHURCH STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Phone Nice 1 71 



Beard & Brown 



SPORTSMAN HARBOR 

Complete Fishing Facilities. Boats and Motors, Modern Cabins, Gas 

Good Foods - Soft Drinks - Beer and Wines 
NICE. Lake County CALIFORNIA 



BUY W A R BONDS 
WAYSIDE INN 

BILL and FLORENCE PHILABAUM 
CLEARLAKE HIGHLANDS. Lake County CALIFORNIA 

J. C. Miller. Manager 

AUSTIN'S RESORT 

on CLEARLAKE 
Boating, Swimming, Dancing, Fishing, Cabins, Camp Grounds 

CLEARLAKE HIGHLANDS P. O. CALIFORNIA 

Davis Minor, Owner 

HARBOR INN 

Good Food and Fine Liquors - Reasonable 
CLEARLAKE PARK. Lake County CALIFORNIA 



Phone Clearlake Oaks I 



Mrs. Henrietta Rice, Owner 



BEEHIVE CAFE 

Cabins - Grocery - Finest of Meals and Liquors 
P. O. BOX 80 CLEARLAKE OAKS. Lake Co.. CALIFORNIA 

Tel. K-32 and B 240 

REX CLUB & BUCKHORN CLUB 

W. Halvorseth, Proprietor 
ON LAKEPORT ROAD VIA HALFORD GRADE 
Phone DOuglas 3890 

S & K SALES COMPANY 

FACTORY DISTRIBUTORS 



GEORGE'S FRUIT MARKET 



1086 VALENCIA STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



GEO. A. KARRAS 

SANDWICH SHOP 



9 32 A MARKET STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Mission 2576 

J. H. KRUSE 

LUMBER. HARDWARE, MILL WORK. SASH, DOORS, 
MOULDINGS, WALL BOARDS 

23rd and FOLSOM STREETS SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

ORdway 042 1 

THORA B ARR 

SPIRITUAL PSYCHOLOGY 

1301 CALIFORNIA STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



VULCAN MACARONI CO. 



445 DRUMM STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



GRaystone 0632 



EDMOND M. DELORT 

UPHOLSTERING — DECORATING 



1470 SUTTER STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



GArfield 96 16 II a.m. to 8 p.m. Daily except Saturday and Sunday 

Sam's Grill and Sea Food Restaurant 

Famous for 
Rex Sole a La Sam, Deviled Crab, Clams, Camille 

561 CALIFORNIA STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

Phone DEIaware 1669 

Compliments of 

ETALO MARKET 



450 BRYANT STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 2714 SAN BRUNO AVENUE 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Phone SUtter 9498 



Jack McVeigh, Prop. p^o^^ TUxedo 3223 



5. E. WEINBERG. Prop. 



THE CENTER CAFE 

The Best of Everything 
BEER - WINE - LIQUORS and LUNCHES 

50 EMBARCADERO SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



MERRY DRUG COMPANY 

PRESCRIPTION DRUGGISTS 

Prompt and Courteous Service 

COR. JONES & O-FARRELL STS. SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



DR. EDW. J. BUCKLEY 



JENISON MACHINERY CO. 



2494 MISSION STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 900 TENNESSEE STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



John D. Cordoni, Prop. 



PILOT BAR 



MARINA BOWL 

BUFFET LUNCH 
365 EMBARCADERO STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. ,725 FILBERT ST. SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



M. SCHUSSLER & CO. 



ODEON CAFE 

Incorporated 
714 FOLSOM STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. ,50 POST STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



DOuglas 4 106 - 4 107 

MONTE CARLO WINE CO. 10 9 9 CLUB 

WINE AND LIQUOR DEALERS Where The Crowd Always Meets 

7 17 \ALLEJO STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 1099 MISSION SAN FR.ANCISCO. CALIF. 



Page 40 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



August, 194S 



FRANK LYNCH, SON OF VETERAN OFFI- 
CER, IN BAIL BOND BUSINESS 

Frank Lynch, the son of retired Sergeant John Lynch, 
has opened a Bail Bond and General Insurance Agency, 
at 621 Washington Street. Sergeant Lynch served his 
entire time in the Department, forty years and twenty 
days, in the Southern Station. He is still hale and hearty 
despite his eighty years, and has been enjoying his pension 
since November 1, 1931. Coincidently, is the fact that on 
the day he was appointed, October 12, 1891, he was told 
to go to the star-maker at 621 Washington Street, and 
fifty-four years later his son opened his Bail Bond Office 
at this same address. 

Frank Lynch recently left the State Service after ten 
years. For over nine years he was connected with the 
Franchise Tax Commission as Senior Information Clerk, 
and Income Tax Examiner. A short part of the time he 
served as Investigator for the California Highway Patrol. 

He was educated at the St. Mary's College and Mar- 
quette University. 

Widely known in San Francisco Lynch is active in 
St. Mary's College Alumni and has been a member of 
the Board of Directors for the last five years, besides 
serving a term as treasurer. He is also a past president 
of Mission Council Y. M. I. and a member of B. P. O. E. 
No. ?. 



PROF. 'WONG YEEN 

HERB PREPARATION FOR ALL AILMENTS 

Hours; 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. 



409 1 0th STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone Hlgate 1092 

BAY CITY IRON 'WORKS 

ENGINEERS AND MACHINISTS 
FOURTH and WASHINGTON STS. OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Phone GLencourt 9870 Fred Schlenker 

MOTOR PARTS COMPANY 

AUTOMOTIVE PARTS 

2424 WEBSTER STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Telephone TEmplebar 784 5 



Antonio Ferro 



BAY CITY BOTTLE SUPPLY COMPANY 

New and Used Bottles of All Kinds 

Corks, Kegs and Sterilized Wiping Rags 

230 CASTRO STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Telephone GLencourt 1889 Res. Hlgate 6089 

HANZEL AUTO BODY WORKS 

A COMPLETE COLLISION SERVICE 

Tops, Painting, Towing, Radiators, Fenders 
23rd and WEBSTER STS. OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone TWinoaks 2244 



Matt Franicevich 



FISHERMAN'S PIER 

OAKLAND SEA FOOD GROTTO 

Sea Foods to Take Out — We Cater to Banquets — Cocktail Lounge 
FOOT OF FRANKLIN STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Office EXbrook 4715; Res. DElaware 6658 



H. NOBLE 



SERVICE 'WOOD CARVING 

CHAIR, CABINET, ARCHITECTURAL 
JIG SAWING— WOOD AND METAL 

124 FOURTH STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



SUtter 4488 



H. L. WEICHHART 



Weichhart-Fairmont Manufacturing Co. 

METAL PRODUCTS— TOOLS — DIES— MACHINE WORK 

237 NATOMA STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

A. M. GILBERT 8C CO. 



WHOLESALE JEWELERS 



704 MARKET STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



HENRY BARTH 



FRED HUTTEMANN 



MIKE'S TAVERN 



I4th ST. & VAN NESS 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



SUtter 0657 DODGE 

HORSEFORD BROTHERS COMPANY 

DODGE TRANSMISSIONEERS 

944 FOLSOM STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



ORdway 9110 



Ray Colt. Resident Manager 



DEWALT HOTEL 



You Will Feel at Home at the Dewalt 

201 LEAVENWORTH ST. SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Phone PRospect 5338 



Gus S. Childress, Manager 



SNAP ON TOOLS CORP. 

Manufacturers: SNAP-ON BLUE-POINT 
Aircraft, Automotive and Industrial Tools 

2 76 GOLDEN GATE AVENUE SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

UNderhill 3950 Harry McCune 

HARRY McCUNE SOUND SERVICE 

RENTAL — SERVICE 

10 BRADY STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

GArfield 5944 

W. M. GUSTAVSON 

District Mgr. International Accountants Society, Inc. 

A Correspondence School Since 1903, Chicago. 111. 

93 1 RUSS BUILDING SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

Telephone UNderhill 0192 

GARRETT M. GOLDBERG PAINT CO. 

Manufacturers Since 1906 
1019 MISSION STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

DOuglas 4810 B. G. Rowe 

NATIONAL LOCKSMITH CO. 

AN EXPERT LOCKSMITHING SERVICE 

167 JESSIE STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

Phone GRaystone 9797 

WEE CLUB 

1342 PACIFIC AVE. SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



HONOLULU CAFE 



Carmelita-Robb Swaby. Owner 



562 GREEN STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Phone TEmplebar 02 80 - 02 81 



James G. Molakides, Prop. ORdway 7377 



GOLDEN BRAND PRODUCTS 

BURGERMEISTER — A Truly Fine Pale Beer 

42 7 E. 12th STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 



SAMBADA'S LIQUOR STORE 

Since 1933 



1346 PACIFIC AVENUE 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Hlgate 9564 



H. Michels 



HENRY'S OVERLAND BUFFET 

WINES - BEER - SANDWICHES 

101 BROADWAY OAKLAND, CALIF. 



BOB DE GRILLA 

833 MARKET STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



August, 194S 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 41 



PETE MALONEY NOW FUNERAL 
DIRECTOR 

"For 26 years Pete Maloney was a memher of the San 
Francisco Police Department, then decided to be a candi- 
date for the office of Sheriff of the city and county of San 
Francisco. In that election he received close to 70,000 
votes for his first time out. 

"During Pete's 26 years, he founded many organizations 
such as The South of Market Boys' Association, The Sun- 
rise Breakfast Cluh, the San Francisco Shut-in Association, 
which had to do with mdigcnt shut-ins. He took 800 people 
over to the World's Fair on Treasure Island in wheel chairs 
and automobiles. 

"He also founded the first big Mothers' Day Breakfast 
in San Francisco, the Fathers' Day Breakfast Club and 
the Christmas Party for the underprivileged kiddies in 
the City Hall. 

"He has been associated with humanitarian work for 
25 years, at present is one of Harry B. Smith's active work- 
ers in his One Man War Bond Drives. 

"Pete has recently became associated in the funeral 
directing business with P. J. Barry who has been a promi- 
nent funeral director in this city for many years. 

"We wish Pete lots of luck and success in his new en- 
deavor. 

"Pete was elected president of the Widows and Or- 
phans Aid Association on its 50th Golden Jubilee and did 
quite a lot of work for this association over the years." 

Compliments ol 

PACIFIC OXYGEN CO. 



2205 MAGNOLIA STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



HIgale 0645 ROUGH DRY SERVICE 

SUPERIOR FRENCH LAUNDRY 

Mending done, socks darned, buttons sewed on free of charge on 

finished and pound finished work 
22nd and POPLAR STS. OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Phone WEst 2816 

MYRTIE'S LIQUOR STORE 

COLD BEER and WINE— CIGARS — CIGARETTES 

1756 BUCHANAN ST. SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone EXbrook 0682 

GEO. KARAVAS BROS. 

THE SCHOONER 

233 THIRD STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone UNderhill 5276 



E. A. Fuller. Mgr. 



VENICE CAFE 



Phone UNderhill 4490 Maurice Fisher 

You will like our improved method of Scientific Cleaning 

CIVIC CENTER CLEANING & TAILORING 



Mixed Drinks Our Specialty 

3074 1 6th STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



Mission 4720 



Mme. J. P. Bourdet 



THE LACE HOUSE FRENCH LAUNDRY 

WE CALL AND DELIVER 

3036 24th STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



JOHN PINSLER CIGAR STORE 



61 McAllister street 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



DOuglas 7891 

ROBERT KIRK, LTD. 

37 POST street SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

PRospect 1061 



JONES CAFE 



AMERICAN AND CHINESE DISHES 
Best Food in Town — Open Day and Night 

ill JONES STREET, near O-Parrell SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



MODERN GROCERY 

165 SEVENTH STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

BALDWIN HOTEL 

32 1 GRANT AVENUE SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

SOUTH OF MARKET HAVEN 



SEVENTH STREET at MISSION 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



CHUTES TAVERN 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



AT THE BEACH 



Compliments 

HARVEY AMUSEMENT CO. 



Phone Mission 4348 



Robert Postler, Prop. 

RELIABLE PAINTING CO. 

PAINTING AND DECORATING 
PAPERHANGING 

3248 19th STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Phone HUmboldt 0728 



Al Santoni 



AVENUE AUTO WRECKING 

NEW AND USED AUTO PARTS 
We Buy, Sell and Exchange Used Cars 

3 120 SAN PABLO AVE. OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone Piedmont 1 103 



Felix Croce 



CROCE'S ROMA RESTAURANT 

REAL ITALIAN DINNERS . . . COCKTAIL BAR 



5036 Telegraph Ave. 
495 FIFTY-FIRST ST. 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone WEst 9829 



Allen Perry 



1 200 CLUB 

WEBSTER AT EDDY SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Phone EXbrook 5288 



Cantegrit & Laline, Props. 



HOTEL GOLDEN EAGLE 

Newly Furnished Rooms — Reading Rooms — Open All Night 
Hot and Cold Water — Bath and Shower 

BROADWAY & MONTGOMERY SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

RAndolph 9716 



1698 MARKET STREET 



STUMBLE INN 

SAN FRANCISCO HILLSIDE BLVD., at CASTLE ST. COLMA, CALIF. 



Page 42 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



August, 1945 



EDWARD J. WHEELER 20 YEARS 

AS SAN CARLOS CHIEF OF POLICE 

Police Chief Edward J. Wheeler of San Carlos, August 
1, observed his 20th anniversary as head of the depart- 
ment which he organized in 1925. 

Chief Wheeler, the first city employee in San Carlos, 
moved to his present home at 1340 Cherry Street, in 1922, 
and joined the volunteer fire department in which he served 
as fire chief since 1923. 

His 21 years' service as fire chief ended in May, 1944, 
when he retired from the non-salaried office. 

When the police department was organized on August 
1, 1925, Wheeler was elected chief. 

Under his leadership, the police department has grown 
from the one-man force necessary to safeguard San Carlos' 
then 600 residents, to a staff necessary to police the present 
population of more than 7,000 persons. 

A native of San Francisco where he was horn 53 years 
ago, Chief Wheeler was employed by a large drayage firm 
before he moved to San Carlos. 

Living with him at his home are Mrs. Wheeler, their 
daughter, Mrs. Myrtle Allman, a daughter-in-law, Mrs. 
Edward A. Wheeler, and a grandson, Edward J. Wheeler, 
II. 

The Wheelers' son is currently with the Seabees in the 
Pacific. 

Chief Wheeler is an active member of the Elks, Lion's 
Club, San Carlos Masonic Club, and Free and Accepted 
Masonic Lodge 168 in Redwood City. 



Telephone DOuglas 9914 



CHARLES 



ADLOPHE 



PARIS LOUVRE 

FRENCH RESTAURANT 

Le Rendezvous Des Gourmets 
Closed on Wednesday 



808 PACIFIC AVE., nr. Stockton St. 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Telephone CArfield 93 15 



Established 1907 



HOTEL DE ESPANA 

AND RESTAURANT 

( Euskaldun Etchea) 
Fermin Huarte - John Bordalampe, Props. 
Headquarters for Wood. Sheep, Cattlemen 

781-783 BROADWAY SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



DOuglas 7023 



Finocchio Bros. 



NEW TIVOLI RESTAURANT 

Accommodations for Special Parties and Banquets 
Finest Italian Dinners — Our Own French Pastry 



M38 GRANT AVE. bet. Green and Union 



SAN FRANCISCO 



EXbrook 2 503 



GEORGE G. OLSHAUSEN 



ATTORNEY AT LAW 



1303 MILLS TOWER 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



PETE'S LUNCH 

MEXICAN DISHES 



WEst 8686 WAlnut 5895 

RUTH DELANEY 

LICENSED REAL ESTATE BROKER 

INSURANCE 

1715 EDDY STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Phone EXbrook 565 1 

S. H. GREENE 

MANAGER SIMPLICITY PATTERN CO. 
109 NEW MONTGOMERY ST. SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

Telephones \Alencia 9 1 02 & \Alencia 2 864 

MISSION CARPET & FURNITURE CO. 

Linoleum, Rugs, Carpets, Rubber Tile 
Furniture, Stoves, Refrigerators, Armoflor 

2301 MISSION ST.. at l^^th SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Phone VAlencia 4727 



Trinidad Villaban 



MI RANCHO GROCERY 

TORTILLAS, TAMALES and CHORIZOS 
Service a Domicilio 



335 1 20th STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



EXbrook 3849 — Res. Phone PRospect 83 14 

KLENSKY BEAUTY SALON 

INDIVIDUAL COIFFEURS — DISTINCTIVE HAIRCUTTING 

PERMANENT WAVING 

150 POWELL ST.. Suite 406 SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



PRICE BUILDING SPECIALTIES CO. 



35 GILBERT STREET 



SAN FR.ANCISCO, CALIF. 



Phone DOuglas 2838 



ALFRED DEL CARLO 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 



550 MONTGOMERY STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Phone ORdway 54 78 

GIFFORD AUTO GLASS COMPANY 

AUTO GLASS REPLACEMENTS 
Authorized Libbey Owens Ford Dealer 

694 GOLDEN GATE AVE. SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

DOuglas 5681 

H . T . DAVIS 

OF W. G. DAVIS & SON 

AUTOMOBILE INSURANCE ADJUSTERS 

340 PINE STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

SKyline 35 15 

GILLAN LUMBER AND HARD'WARE CO. 



3931 GEARY BL\ D. 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Phone UNderhill I 160 



THE VIA VI COMPANY 



50 FELL STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



BOWSER INC 



468 9th STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Phone SUtter 4535 



J. H. POMEROY & CO., INC. 

GENERAL CONTRACTORS 



333 MONTGOMERY' STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



SHEWAN-JONES. INC. 

LEJON BRANDY - LEJON VERMOUTH 

CHATEAU LEJON RED AND WHITE DINNER WINES 

HARTLEY BRANDY - HARTLEY DRY SHERRY 

PACIFIC FELT COMPANY, INC. 

Manufacturers - Distributors 
of Quality Cotton and Wool Products 



366 EDDY 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 700-798 YORK STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



August, 1945 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 43 



SECOND HARRINGTON SON CITED 

It falls to the lot of few of the millions of parents of 
men in our fighting forces to have two sons cited for ex- 
traordinary service by their highest commanding officers. 
The San Francisco Police Department has a father who has 
two sons who have won thir merited honor. He is Officer 




Lt. Eugene Harrington 

Walter E. Harrington attached to the Central company. 
In the last issue of the Police and Peace Officers' Journal 
we presented an account of the official citation being 
awarded to Lieutenant Walter D. Harrington, by his 
division commander for his actions in the European war. 

Since then Officer Harrington has received word that his 
second son, Lieutenant (j.g.) Eugene USNR, has been 
commended by Vice Admiral T. C. Kincaid, commander 
of the Seventh Fleet of the U. S. Navy. The commendation 
states that Lieutenant Harrington distinguished himself 
by his excellent services as a torpedo officer on the U. S. S. 
Destroyer R. P. Leary (D.D. 664), by enabling his vessel 
to deliver an accurate and effective attack on the enemy 
while under gunfire in the Southwest Pacific. 

Lieutenant Harrington's destroyer took part in the foh 
lowing engagements: Saipan, Tinian, Palau, Leyte, battle 
of Surigo Straits (where his ship got credit for sinking a 
Jap battleship) , Luzon, Lingayan Gulf, Iwo Jima and Oki- 
nawa. His destroyer and crew are now taking an active 
part in Japanese home waters. 

The young officer his been in the Navy for three years 
and has spent the past 15 months in the far Pacific area. 
He was born in San Francisco, attended St. Ignatius High 
School and graduated from the University of San Fran- 
cisco. He is married, his wife being the former Helene 
Murphy, daughter of the late Joseph, former editor of the 
Labor Clarion. 



THE BARREL INN 



MORCK BRUSH MANUFACTURING CO. 



236 EIGHTH STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Phone DOuglas 3 740 Dies, Jigs, Fixtures, Special Machinery 

LATHE TOOL WORKS 

Fine Model and Experimental Work, Gear Cutting, Toolwork, Etc. 

GENERAL MACHINE WORK 
3 7 CLEMENTINA ST. SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



STUART OXYGEN CO. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone Fillmore 24 14 



Established 1890 



CAREW 8C ENGLISH 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS 

Memorial Chapels 
MASONIC at GOLDEN GATE AVE SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

Compliments of 
GRAND LODGE OF CALIFORNIA 

Order Sons of Italy in America 

678 GREEN STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

Phone DOuglas 824 1 

ANCHOR BRASS WORKS 

Rt^pairing - Jobbing - Manufacturing 
£xp:^rt Gauge Testing and Repairing 

187 STEUART STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

Phona HEmlock 1432 Manufacturers of Leather Accessories 

ACME LEATHER PRODUCTS 

Specialists in Leather - Die Cutting - Eyeletting - Lace and 
Strap Cutting - Embossing 



170! FOLSOM STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



INDEPENDENT LITHOGRAPH CO. 

NATRALITH 



ALABAMA at SIXTEENTH ST 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Compliments of 

CHARLIE'S AND BILL'S PLACE 

1898 FOLSOM STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

NORTHAM WARREN CORPORATION 



13 FOLSOM STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



BAUER SCRAP IRON 



YARD 21 MORROW STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Tel. MArket 0266 



Res. Mission 2013 



VAN NESS SOUTH GROCERY 

E. OTTOBONl. Prop. 



601 VAN NESS. South Cor. 17th 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



UNderhill 0800 



Res. Mission 726 I 



F. G. Lundberg 



PIONEER PIPE COMPANY 

RECONDITIONING AND NEW PIPE 
CASING, VALVES and FITTINGS 

634 TOWNSEND STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Phone HEmlock 6112 

SHAW MANUFACTURING CO. 

MACHINERY & PRODUCTION MANUFACTURING 
Jig, Die, Tool, Gauge & Fixture Makers 

334 SO. VAN NESS AVE. SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF, 

Phone UNderhill 2 722 

MIAMI BUFFET 



139 ELLIS STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



I 7th & FLORIDA STREETS 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Page 44 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



August, 194S 



BAY CITIES BUSINESS DIRECTORY 



California Savings and Loan Co. 



RANG'S GARAGE 



H. 8i M. GROCERY 



673 Market Street 



San Francisco 6601 Mission St. 



Daly City 



499 Douglass Street 



San Francisco 



Ph. UNderhill 5 89 1 Cash & Carry. Delivery 

DROHER COAL CO. 

Quality Coals. All Kinds, Big Savings 

Milorganite, the Ideal Fertilizer 

1331 Folsom Street San Francisco 

Phone C.Arfteld 959\ 

FERRY GARAGE 

Washing, Polishing, Greasing, Repairing 

24 Drumm St.. at Market San Francisco 



KEUogg 0652 



A. Jensen 



BAY CITIES FORGE CO. 



1038 2 3rd Ave. 



Oakland 



JAMES SHOE REPAIRING 

First Class Work Guaranteed 

2176 Chestnut St. San Francisco 

Phone MOntrose 2 726 

Art Tuggey's West Portal Hdwe. 

Plumbing — Home wares — Repairing 
Electrolux Refrigerators 

66 West Portal Ave. San Francisco 



W. TAPPENBECK 

SAUSAGE MANUFACTURER 

3 119 24th Street San Francisco 

SUtter 1341 

R. & J. DICK CO., INC. 

Mechanical Power Transmission 
Appliances and Supplies 

5 10 Bryant Street San Francisco 

CArfield 2090 

WAYNE R. MILLINGTON 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 
Central Tower San Francisco 

Phone PRospect 9860 Al & Leo La Rocco 

LA ROCCA'S CORNER 

"This Is It" 

95 7 Columbus Ave. San Francisco 

Compliments of 

Alhambra 5c & 10c Store 

2246 Polk Street San Francisco 

CArfield 3522 

American Electrotype Company 



329 Fremont St. 



San Francisco 



Tel. DOuglas 2554 

C. FIDICHIERO 8C CO. 

Imported and Domestic Groceries 

Wines and Liquors 

444 Union Street San Francisco 

Compliments of 

JOE JUDNICK'S INN 

590 San Bruno San F rancisco 

JACK FORBES' PANTRY 

1 72 Fourth Street San Francisco 



Metz Cream Doughnut Shop 

2778 24th Street San Francisco 



Phone VAlencia 6764 

O. M. CORBETT 

Expert Taxidermist - Game Head Specialist 

32 16 Mission St., at Valencia, San Francisco 



EDMUND LOEWY &. CO., Inc. 



130 Sutter St. 



San Francisco 



TUxedo 266 1 

MILTON PIERCE ROPP 

Vocational Guidance 

450 Geary Street San Francisco 

GArfield 0068 

Kaplan's Army 8C Salvage Store 

Wholesale & Retail Clothing, Shoes, Luggage 
Radios, Sporting, Fishing, Camping. Riding 
Goods 250 3rd St., San Francisco 

Tel. MArket 1323 Open Sundays and Eves. 

KING BROS. BOOK STORE 

NEW, USED & UNUSUAL BOOKS 
If you can't secure the book J'ou want, try us 
1224 Market Street San Francisco 

HOTEL THOMAS 

971 Mission Street San Francisco, Calif. 

SUtter 63 4 1 

ELINOR ARNOLD 

Personal Introductions 
For Refined Single Ladies and Gentlemen 

703 Market St,. Room 1214. San Francisco 

BLOU-SLIP CO. 

OF CALIFORNIA 
865 Mission Street San Francisco 

Granucci's O. Baldacci 8C Co. 

Grocery Dept. Grand Market Meat Dept. 
Imported-Domestic Groceries, Fruits, Vege- 
tables, Choice Meats 13 75 Leavenworth St. 



LIBERTY HOTEL 



Bus. DElaware 5644 Res. ELkridge 145 5 

Mission Bedding 8C Upholstering Co. 

Chesterfields and Chairs Recovered and Mod- 
ernized - New Chesterfields With Sprngs 
472 7 Mission Street San Francisco 

ORIENTAL GEM COMPANY 



Phone Mission 9080 



George Petersen 



Geo. Petersen 8C Sons Furniture Co. 

Complete Home Furnishings for Every Room 

494 7 Third Street San Francisco 



Phone Mission 7228 



Chas. Keane, Prop. 



KEANE'S MARKET 

Choice Meats - Free Delivery 

925 Cortland Avenue San Francisco 

Phone HEmlock 2032 All Work Guaranteed 

EDW. PETOUD 

Swiss Watchmakers and Jewelers 

1756 Mission St., nr. 14th St.. San Francisco 

VIENI-VIENI CAFE 



13 13 Stockton Street 



San Francisco 



PENINSULA DRUG CO. 



682 Third Street 



San Francisco 



Phone EVergreen 9669 

EMMETT'S AUTO REPAIR 

Emmet t DeSaussure 
636 Shrader Street 
Bet. Haight & Waller San Francisco 



GIL'S DELICATESSEN 



3200 Sacramento Street 



San Francisco 



Tel. ORdway 3933 

FAYLEEN'S 

LADIES WEARING APPAREL 

15 12 Polk Street San Francisco 

WARREN A. SLOAT ' 

GAS - OIL - TIRES - BATTERIES 



3 00 So. \an Ness 



San Francisco 



J. J. O'CONNOR 

FLORIST 

Cor. 2 5 th & Mission Sts. San Francisco 

J. C. MOORE CO. 

GROCERS 



Phone sutler 1671 



Chas. ,A. ^'oung Co. 



THE YOUNG COMPANY 

Marine & Industrial Wire Rope, Splicing, etc. 

840 Harrison Street San Francisco 

Phone ORdway 7866 

LUCERNE APARTMENTS 



46 Kearny Street 



San Francisco 766 Sutter St., nr. Jones 



San F: 



rancisco 



Phone MArket 393 I 



Master Painters 



LEEPER 8C REINHARD 

Duco Painting - Lettering Striping 

1465 Stevenson St. San Francisco 

A. & J.. LEVIN 

Leather Goods and Trunks 

5 66 Market Street San Francisco 

Phones: SKyline 814 1 - B.Ayview 283 7 

GOLDEN GATE NURSERY 

6726 Geary Blvd. at 3 1st Avenue 

Main Nursery: 5 16 42nd Ave. at Geary. S. F. 



LOVELADY GROCERY 

Fruits - Vegetables 
Beer & Wines - School Supplies 

485 30th St Mission 1619 San Francisco 

Phone RAndolph 9790 Joe «c Hank 

VELLONE'S 

Beer - Wines - Liquors 

28 I 6 Diamond Streeet San Francisco 

Tel. San Bruno 172 1 .AI. DeFabia. Prop. 

"AL'S SPAGHETTI SHACK" 

Al's Spaghetti, 35c - Hamburgers, 10c 
FRUIT MARKET 

13 00 El Camino Real North Millbrae 



August, 194S 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 4'i 



W. p. WOBBER ILL 

William P. Wobber, a member of the Police Commis- 
sion for some four years under former Mayor Angelo 
Rossi, has been confined to St. Francis Hospital, where his 
condition is reported improving. 

One of the city's important figures in real estate hold- 




WiLLiAM P. Wobber 

ings, and co-owner of "Wobber's", one of the leading 
printing businesses in this city, which also operates a sta- 
tionery store on Market Street, during his term as a police 
commissioner devoted a lot of time to his important job for 
which the pay is very insignificant. He is a native San 
Franciscan and for this reason he did all he could which 
was plenty to see that the town remained free from all 
major crimes. He was popular with the members of the 
Police Department and with the peace officers of the bay 
area, being a member of the Bay Counties' Peace Officers' 
Association, and at the last meeting of that organization 
the announcement of his illness caused sincere regrets 
among the large attendance. 



COAST GUARD BIRTHDAY 

(Continued from Page JJj 

To help Port Security activities, thousands of patriotic 
Americans answered the call and enlisted in the Coast 
Guard Auxiliary and Temporary Reserve, performing 
tasks formerly done by regular Coast Guardsmen, releas- 
ing these men for combat duty at sea. Ten thousand 
women have donned the silver shield as members of the 
Coast Guard Spars. 

The Coast Guard is truly living up to its name, "Semper 
Paratus — Always Ready." 

Telephone DOuglas 4070 

ALBERT PICARD 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 

FINANCIAL CENTER BLDG. 
405 MONTGOMERY STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Phone sutler 7427 

TLOH FOOD SHOP 

To Please You, an Ambition - Making Friends Our Religion 
240 CALIFORNIA STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Phone MArket 2910 

BETTER VALUE MARKET 

GROCERIES, FRUITS and VEGETABLES 

COR. 18th and CONNECTICUT SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Phone YUkon 2905 

LANTERN FOOD PRODUCTS CO. 

SOY SAUCE MANUFACTURERS 

246 FRONT STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Phone Mission 4914 

SO. SAN FRANCISCO TALLOW WORKS 



1420 EVANS AVENUE 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



LENORA DRESS COMPANY 

MANUFACTURERS 



73 1 MARKET STREET, Room 404 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



CONTINENTAL BAKING CO. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone ORdway 5246 



G. Tofanelli 



A. ROMEO FISH & OYSTER CO. 

CABLE OYSTER DEPOT 

12 79 PACIFIC STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



MAJESTIC SMOKE SHOP 



1798 GEARY STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



WEST COAST LIFE INSURANCE CO. 



605 MARKET STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Phone WEst 1552 Bric-a-Brac, Furniture, Etc. 

Mrs. Victoria Miron Misfit Parlors 

Positively Pays the Highest Prices for Ladies* and Gents' Second- 
Hand Gowns, Dresses and Suits. Also New Furs. 

1750 GEARY ST.. bet. Fillmore & Webster SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone EXbrook 1940 

ATLAS ELEVATOR COMPANY 

MANUFACTURING - REPAIRS - MAINTENANCE 

417 SIXTH STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Phone UNderhill 7161 Sheet, Rod, Wire, Tube, Rivets, Wire Cloth 

R. J. LEAHY CO. 

Brass, Copper, Bronze and Nickel Silver Products 

486 EIGHTH STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Phone SUtter 7874 



ESTHER ROTHSCHILD 

COATS, DRESSES and SPORT WEAR 



420 POST STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Phone MArket 1711 



Established 1885 



A. Quandt 



A. QUANDT 8C SONS 

PAINTERS and DECORATORS 



3 74 GUERRERO STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Page 46 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



August, 1945 



ANNUAL TRANSFERS OF CAPTAINS 

The annual shifts of Captains of the San Francisco 
Police Department inaugurated a year ago by Police Com- 
missioners Jerd Sullivan, J. Wesley Howell and E. L, 
Turkington was postponed this year until after the United 
Nations Conference. But last month seven Captains were 
moved from one station to another in accordance with the 
newly adopted policy of rotating commissioned officers to 
different districts annually. 

Captain Michel Mitchell, v.'ho did such a splendid job 
of commanding the hundred selected men for policing 
the conference area, was detailed to fill the vacancy as 
Captain of Traffic, occasioned by the death of Captain 
Charles F. Skelly. Captain Mitchell was in charge of 
Taraval District at the time. 

Captain Joseph Walsh was moved from Potrero Station 
to Central and Captain Arthur Christiansen was sent from 
the latter to Ingleside. Captain Aloysius O'Brien who has 
for years so well policed the Northern District, was sent 
to Southern, and Alexander McDaniell of Southern was 
transferred to Mission. Captain Leo Tackney who has 
made the Mission district a law-abiding area of the City 
is now at Potrero. Captain John M. Sullivan from Ingle- 
side to Northern. 

Captain John M. Wade who has for years been property 
clerk was sent to Taraval and Captain Patrick Murphy is 
now holding the position as head of the City Prison staff. 

Supervisor of Captains Michael Gaffey has been ap- 
pointed Secretary of the Police Commission, a job filled 
so ably by the late Charies Skelly for nearly forty years. 

Captain John Reed of Park and Captain Frank McGuire 
of Richmond were not affected by this latest change. 



Compliments of 

PRESIDENT FOLLIES THEATER 



60 McAllister street 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



AARON GOLDBERG THEATRES 

PEERLESS THEATRE — Third Street near Mission 

NEWSREEL THEATRE — Next to Warfield 

SILVER PALACE THEATRE — Market Street Opposite Grant Ave. 

REGAL THEATRE — Market Street near Paramount Theatre 

NEW NEWSREEL THEATRE — 1118 Broadway, Oakland 



THE MIRROR 



63 TAYLOR STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Telephone GArfield 5946. Long Dist. GArfield 8764. Teletype S. F. 2 1 

PALMER C. MENDELSON CO. 

Palmer C. Mendelson — Edward M. Zeller 
DISTRIBUTORS OF CALIF. FRESH FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 

I DRUMM STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Compliments 

SIMONS 8c BOGER CO. 



86 THIRD STREET 



S.AN FR.ANCISCO. CALIF. 



GArfield 3 129 



Joseph Carcione - Russell Perkins 



BANK of AMERICA BLDG. BARBER SHOP 



819 BANK OF .AMERICA BLDG. 
Montgomery & Pine Streets 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Phone Mission 3604 

OCCIDENTAL PLATING WORKS, INC. 

Alumilite Process - Chromium Plating - Polishing 
Oxidizing - Spraying 

2259 FOLSOM STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



AMERICAN BAG CO. 
UNION HIDE CO. 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone DOuglas 9661 



AI Kantrow 



M. Robinson, Mgr. 



THE OUTBOARD MOTOR SHOP 



ST. FRANCIS LUGGAGE SHOP 

Wardrobe Trunks - Aviation Luggage 



Contract No. 4433 



3260 SAN PABLO AVE. 



c^lKland, calif. 



140 POWELL STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. Phones KEUogg 2-8966 Res. GLencourt 8423 



Phone MArket 11 30 

HOME LAUNDRY CO. 

A Particular Laundry for Particular People 

WE HANDLE ALL CLASSES OF LAUNDRY WORK 
3336 SEVENTEENTH STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

Phone sutler 9804 

HELVETIA HOTEL 

Jack Gschwend, Mgr. 

637-641 CALIFORNIA STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

BAyview 7367 

A. N. SHOE RENEWING 

Expert Shoe Repairing — Guaranteed Satisfaction 
5727 GEARY BLVD. 
Bet. 21st & 22nd Ave. SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

Look at your shoes — We have rapid repair service while you wait 

GEORGE'S NOD-LAY SHOE RENEWING 

First Class Work Guaranteed 

We Specialize in Dyeing - Shining and Resizing Shoes 

1321 GOLDEN GATE AVE. Fillmore 9482 SAN FRANCISCO 



CABINETS BY JOSEPHS 

Fred B. Roberts 



501 29th AVENUE 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



MYRTIE'S LIQUOR STORE 



1256 BUCHANAN STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



HIgate 101 I 



W. G. Ledgett, Manager 



PIONEER SAWDUST DEPOT 

Service Since 1893 
Pine, Oak, Redwood and Cedar — Sawdusts Sifted to All Grades 

2800 PERALTA STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

Telephone Piedmont 0772 E. E. Costello 

OAKLAND OVERALL LAUNDRY, INC. 



3423 HARLAN STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Tel. HIgate 9781 



Hebery the Night Owl 



J. C. ROMO 



SUtter 9882 A. URREA 

TIJUANA CANTINA 

BEST WINES, LIQUORS — MEXICAN DISHES 

The Place to meet vour friends 

671 BROADWAY " SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



LA RHUMBA CAFE 



Choice Beer, Wines and Liquors, Good Eats — Try Us — Schlitz Beer 
501 CLAY STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 

Phones Higate 775,3 - 7754 - 7755 



MARY'S INN 

CHOICE WINES, LIQUORS AND FOOD 

"In the Heart of North Beach " 

528 GREEN STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



THOS. CARTER GLASS CO. 

Plate and Window Glass - Automobile Glass 

333 9th STREET, bet. Webster & Harrison Sts. OAKLAND. CAL. 



August, 194 J 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 47 



WM. MARTIN & SON 

BUILDING CONTRACTORS 

666 MISSION STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Phones SUtler 1642 - 1643 

ROLANDO LUMBER COMPANY 

FIR - SPRUCE - REDWOOD 
Yard and Mill: 5th & BERRY STS. SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

ELLA & PHIL'S 

441 CLUB 

WE SATISFY PARTICULAR PEOPLE 

441 JONES STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

EXbrook 7542 

H. G. WALTERS CO. 

POPCORN AND PEANUTS 

224 NATOMA STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

UNDERHILL 0438 

ANSEL J. SCHLOSS, INC. 

STUDEBAKER — QUALITY USED CARS 

49 SO. VAN NESS AVE. 
Between Market and Mission 



Telephone SUtter 5 150 

EUGENE E. JEREBTSOFF 

DENTAL LABORATORY 

5 15 FLOOD BUILDING SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



HOTEL FEDERATION 

ROOMS FOR SERVICEMEN 

122 THE EMBARCADERO SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



UNderhill 9380 



Phil Buck 



LITTLE DERBY BAR 



"The Biggest Little Spot in Town" 
92 SIXTH ST. SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

VAlencia 15 42 Between Mission and Capp 

MISSION TIME SERVICE 

WATCHMAKERS - JEWELERS 
CERTIFIED WATCH REPAIRING 

3 168 TWENTY. SECOND ST. SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Phone HEmlock 1 75 5 



L. H. Meyers 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



PACIFIC TEA PACKING COMPANY 

INDIVIDUAL TEA BAG PACKING 
Coffee Urn Bags — Flannel Filter Pads 

1663 MISSION ST. SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



VAlencia 93 76 



REID'S GROCERY 



ORdway 14 14 



DE SOTO SEDAN SERVICE 



601 TOMPKINS AVE. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



CHAUFFEUR DRIVEN SEDANS 
24 Hours Insured Service 



Compliments of 

Pacific Pharmaceutical Laboratory 



1399 POST ST. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Phone MArket 6336 



J. A. Arnke 



ARNKE IRON WORKS 



PACIFIC BUILDING 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Phone RAndolph 9605 "Hap" Hogan — "Ches" 'Boehm 

Coming or going on the Mission Road stop at the 

AVALON TAVERN 

43 70 MISSION ST., Cor. of Theresa SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Walter C. Dana, San Francisco Branch Manager. 

ABBOTT LABORATORIES 

DERMATOLOGICAL RESEARCH LABORATORIES 

612 HOWARD STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Executive Offices: Boston, Massachusetts 

UNITED DRUG COMPANY 

SAN FRANCISCO BRANCH 

598 SEVENTH ST. SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



DOMENIC G. PENSABENE 

JEWELRY 

5 19 COLUMBUS AVE. SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

WATERFRONT IRON WORKS 

Ornamental Iron Work — Truck and Auto Bodies — General Repairs 
Acetylene and Electric Welding — Boat Repairing — Blacksmithing 

335 BAY STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Phone GArfield 9804 



ORNAMENTAL METALS & STRUCTURAL IRON 
F;re Escapes — Bronze, Aluminum, Stainless Steel 

760 - 786 BRANNAN STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

W. C. LASSWELL 8C CO. 

MORTICIANS 

6154 MISSION STREET DALY CITY, CALIF. 

Compliments of 

MONROE - ANDREW 



386 POST STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Compliments of 

I M AGNIN & CO. 

GEARY and GRANT AVENUE SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Phone ORdway 1932 L. E. Rodgers, Managing Owner 

BROADMOOR HOTEL 



SUTTER at COUGH 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Phone MArket 2 J": 

UNION MACHINE COMPANY 

Engineers and Machinists - Brewer's Machinery - Diesel Engines 

934 BRANNAN STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



I Orbe & J. Orbe. Props. Phone VAlencia 57 13 



Fred Bernier, Sec.-Treas. 



JAI-ALAI CAFE 

SPANISH BASQUE DINNERS 
895 PACIFIC AVE., Cor Powell St. SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Telephone EXbrook 1 768 



Jose Riveira, Prop. 



RIVEIRA & GONZALES 

Manufacturers Since 1915 of 
EL REVINO BRAND CUSTOM MADE CIGARS 

32 FRONT STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Telephone SUtter 68 10 



P. O. Box 2187 



JACOBS, MALCOM & BURTT 

Wholesale Dealers, Receivers and Distributors of 
California Fruits, Poultry, Eggs, Wool, Hides, Potatoes, Produce 

101-107 WASH. ST. 239. 253 DRUMM ST.. SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



PREMIER PAPER BOX CO. 

The Home of HANDLE-LOK Boxes 

Fancy Die Cutting - Embossing - Sheet Mounting 

900 ALABAMA STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Phone EXbrook 3 123 Founded by R. T. Crane 185 5 

C RA N E CO. 

Valves - Fittings - Pipe - Plumbing - Heating - Pumps 

301 BRANNAN STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



NOTRE DAME HIGH SCHOOL 



347 DOLORES STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Page 48 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



August, 1945' 



OFFICER GEORGE HAGERMAN CITED 
BY GENERAL 

Mrs. George Hagerman, Jr., of 4637 18th Street, has 
received notice from General George C. Kenney, who 
has been General MacArthur's right-hand man in his 




Sergeant George H.^GERMAN 

famed air force of the far Pacific, that her husband has 
been awarded the air medal. George Hagerman, Jr., is a 
member of the San Francisco Pohce Department, has the 
rank of Technical Sergeant, and was a bombardier radio 
man, with the Alhed Air Force of the South Pacific area. 
He has been with this outfit for over two years. 

In his letter to Mrs. Hagerman, General Kenney said: 

Sergeant Hagerman, from December 23, 1944, to April 
13, 194'?, took part in operational flight missions, during 
which contact was probable and expected. Bombing in- 
stallations and supply bases, he has aided considerably 
in the naval success in this theatre. 

Almost every hour of every day your husband, and the 
husbands of other American women have been doing just 
as that here m the Southwest Pacific. 

I would like to tell you how genuinely proud I am to 
have such men as your husband in my command and how 
grateful I am to know that young Americans with such 
courage and resourceflness are fighting our country's bat- 
tles against the Japanese aggressor. 



Phone Mission 4640 



THOMAS B. RICKEY 



GOLDEN GATE DISTRIBUTING CO. 

WINES and LIQUORS 
Wholesale Candies, Cigars and Cigarettes 

884 VALENCIA STREET, at 20lh ST. SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

H. A. Hulegard - E. A. Perry 

VALLEY TIME SERVICE 

GUARANTEED REPAIRING 

207 SOUTH STATE STREET UKIAH. CALIF. 



Phone 157 



CRA'WFORD DRUG STORE 



ROBBERY STORY BY INSP. MAJORS 

( Continued from Page 7 ) 
them with wire and electrician's tape. They had just com- 
pleted binding them up when an uninvited guest dropped 
by in the person of the driver of the Sterling Laundry. 
Driver Collins was a little slow in obeying the commands 
of the holdup men to lie on the floor as he was a little 
puzzled as to what was taking place in the daylight holdup. 
But the bandits threatened to kick him in the face and 
mimediately tied him up too. The bandits took all the 
cash and jewelry off the victims and robbed the safe of 
approximately $1000 in cash and checks. They also took 
two religious medals from Driver Collins and Andre 
Marty, proprietor of the cleaning establishment. They also 
took Marty's watch, a watch he treasured very highly 
as it had been in his family for many generations. The 
descriptions furnished by the victims in these three rob- 
beries indicated that the same two men were involved 
in all these recent holdups, as their ages and descriptions 
tallied, and they were armed with .45 's in each case. 
( To Be Continued ) 

Telephone VAIencia 7523 

EVELYN'S RESTAURANT 



Breakfa.t 

2520 THIRD STREET 



Lunch — Dinner — Beer 

SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Telephone V.Alencia 5634 



B. & D. GROCETERIA 



3 148 TWENTY-SECOND STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Telephone VAIencia ^400 



V. CERRUTl 



GOLDEN EAGLE WINE 8C LIQUOR CO. 

wholesale Wines, Beer and Liquors — Price, Service, Quality 

5 122 THIRD STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

Phone ATwater 4914 

JACK JOHNSON COMPANY 

ROOFING 



3365 ARMY STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Phone RAndolph 9592 



John Howarth 



106 SOUTH STATE STREET 



UKIAH. CALIF. 



DALY CITY AUTO WRECKERS 

USED PARTS FOR ALL CARS 
CARS BOUGHT, SOLD AND EXCHANGED 

7201 MISSION STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

Phone sutler 6522 Lawrence C. Sullivan 

W. C. TAIT COMPANY 

GENERAL CONTRACTORS 

461 MARKET STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

SUtter 2894 

WILLITS AND COMPANY, INC. 

1 DRUMM ST. SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

BUY WAR BONDS 
AND STAMPS 

UNderhill 995 3 R. L. Hinshaw 

HINSHAW SUPPLY COMPANY 

REFRIGERATION - AIR CONDITIONING - BUTANE 
OIL HEATING - PARTS - TOOLS - SUPPLIES 

1208 HOWARD ST.. SAN FRANCISCO Sacramento 

Bowes and Massahos, Props. 

HOTEL OPERA 

Rooms With Private Baths and Showers 
Steam Heat — Elevator Service 

145 FELL ST. SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



August, 194? 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 49 



S. F. POLICE PROMOTIONS 

The San Francisco Police Department has four new 
Sergeants. From the eHgible Hst the PoHce Commission 
on July 30 promoted the following patrolmen: 

Martin Lee of the Bureau of Inspectors, who remains 
in the Bureau; Francis P. Harrington of Northern, sent 
to Park; James H. Kerr of Northern, assigned to Potrero; 
John D. Sullivan, Central, detailed to Richmond. 

At the time the above promotions were announced 
Captain of Inspectors Bernard McDonald announced the 
elevation of Assistant Inspectors Michael Chrystal, Mat- 
thew Savasta and John O'Keefe, to full inspectors and 
John Keohane and George Heeg as temporary inspectors. 

Inspectors John Ross and Harry McCrea were brought 
down from the Bureau of Identification, McCrea assigned 
to the Missing Persons Bureau under Inspector Marvin 
Dowell and Ross to office duty on the day watch. 



Phone 6Y13 for Reservations 

THE LODGE 

"The Lodge of a Thousand Lights" 
CABINS - BOATING - FISHING 

Italian Dinners Famous from Coast to Coast 
Imported and Domestic Liquors 

Clearlake Highlands 



Our 
2088 


pl^bar 254 1 

HOW NONG HERB CO. 

HESBS FOR ALL AiLMENTS 

famous Ch n s?? herbs £ur?ly wi'l h _^lp you rcga n h alth 

TELEGRAPH OAKLAND, 


quckly 
CALIF. 



.f^hone HUmboldt 8000 



P. Ra 



THE OUTBOARD MOTOR SHOP 

EVINRUDE - ELTO 

Boats - Parts - Repairs - Outboard Motors 
3260 SAN PABLO AVENUE OAKLAND. CALIF. 

California Motor Express, Ltd. 
California Motor Transport Co., Ltd. 

1081 22nd STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 

Phone MArket ')2')9 OLD CORNER 

OLD CORNER RESTAURANT 

Beer — Wines — Liquors — Italian Dinners 



Phone Lowerlake 4Y3 

Enjoy Our 

CHICKEN DINNERS 

Dine and Dance Overlooking 

the Lake, and Enjoy Jim & 

Joe's Hospitality 

Swimming, Boating, Fishing and Cottages 

Box 266 

Clearlake Highlands 



ROY BEASLEY 



1800 THIRD STREET (Cor. I6lh) 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 205 TEHAMA STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



VETERANS OF WORLD WAR II! 

If you are interested in a Hot>/e Loan 
. . . whether a 

GI Loan • ^;/ FH A Loan 
or ^ Bank Loan 

call at any of our seven offices 

• 

THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

SA VINGS Inc. Pti. 10, 1868 ■ Member Federal Depoiit Ins. Corp. TR UST 

526 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 

SEVEN OFFICES — EACH A COMPLETE BANK 



Page SO 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



August, 1945' 



WILLETTS' CHIEF OF POLICE 

Willets the busy little Mendocino County city of 2,500 
people is well known to thousands of people who travel 
the Redwood Highway. Its population is made up of men 
and women whose parents settled in that section years 
ago. It has always been recognized as a place of little law 
violation and the peace of the community is maintained 
by a force of a Chief of Police and three men. 

The Chief is Edward Partins, who is a typical mountain 
man of over six feet high and built like the rugged pio- 
neers of California's early day settlers.. He was born in 
Willets fifty years ago and he and his wife have always 
taken an active interest in the welfare of their native city. 

Chief Partin has a brother who was a former Chief of 
Police of Los Banos. 

The Willets Police Department is made up of Officers 
Edward Stoddard, Flory Creiger and Buster Sandley. 

The members of the Willets Police Department are ably 
assisted in their enforcement by Police Judge A. M. Sacry, 
who is also city clerk and who has lived in Willets for 
40 years. 



Telephone GArfield 77 18 



Romani Rosellini Nieri, Prop. 



FLORENCE RAVIOLI FACTORY 

FRESH RAVIOLI. TAGLIARINI & TORTELLINI DAILY 

Imported and Domestic Groceries 



1412 STOCKTON STREET 



SAN FRANC ISIO, CALIF, 



r 



Just say.. :G0\1GH AT MARKET" 

and you're there 

Shop the easy -way. Streetcars J, K, L, M, N, 6, 7 and 17 stop 
ia front of our door. 

Get a fine Fleecedown mattress at our easy to reach manufactur- 
ing store. Airflex, experts in sleeping needs, will advise and help 
you select the mattress exactly suited to you. 
If you drive we have a large free parking lot adjoining our store. 
Mattresses shipped free of charge to any railroad point in the 
United States. 

AIRFLEX 

EDWARD McROSKEY MATTRESS CO. 

1687 MARKET STREET ■ SAN FRANCISCO 
Opposite Gough Street Free Parking 



\: 



PLAY AND RELAX at... 




PLAYLAND 




at the BEACH 




Located at Ocean Beach near the 
Cliff House and famed Seal R 


historic 
ocks. 


Home of Thrill-Provoking Rides ... Unique 
fronting the Blue Pacific ... Oceans of Fun 


Restaurants 
for Everyone! 


Owned and Operated by 

WHITNEY BROTHERS 





Phone 25 



Home Market 

H. M. Thatcher - C. W. Maurer 

GROCERIES — VEGETABLES 
MEATS 



113 South State St., Ukiah, Calif. 



Telephone 500 



Cecille Hotel 

BILL MATHEWS, Prop. 

COFFEE SHOP 
FREE PARKING 

UKIAH, CALIFORNIA 



Phone 222 

Elsie Dory - Paul H. Dory 

The Towne Club 

"Longest Bar In Town" 
BEST OF SERVICE 

DANCING 
WILLITS, CALIF. 



EXbrook 9500 

San Gottardo Hotel 

Luis Carena — Ugo Mattei 

Lunches - Dinners - Wines - Liquors 
217 Columbus Ave., San Francisco 

Near Kearny 8C Pacific 



August. 1945 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 51 



^♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦¥****»*»*»»********»**»»***¥^|j 



Amusement Center 

A REAL PLACE TO HAVE 
A REAL TIME 



■¥ 

* 
I 



} 1701 POST STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 






Phone SUtter 4148 
Res. Redwood City 1381 

A. S. DUTRA 

DREDGING, DITCHING 
and CONTRACTING 

223 California Street, San Francisco 



GLIDE 
FOUNDATION 



322 Ellis Street 



San Francisco 



California 



SUtter 6300 

WALTER L CARPENETI 

ATTORNEY-AT-LAW 
333 Montgomery Street 



CHANCELLOR 
HOTEL 

435 POWELL STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



ADAMS 

An 800-acre pleasure land for a perfect 
vacation. All the sports and recreation fa- 
cilities of a modern mountain resort plus 
Adams famous mineral water. Dancing 
nightly. Swimming, Badminton, Riding, 
Hiking, etc. Many improvements. New 
cocktail lounge. Greyhound stages direct 
to our door daily. On Highway 29. 

For information write 

CLARENCE PRATHER, Mgr. 
Adams Springs, Lake Co., Calif. 



LOCH LOMOND 


Lake County, California 


Adams Post Office, Calif. 


* 


Cottages, Cabins, Camping, Country Home Sites, 


Cocktail Lounge, Store, Service Station, 


Coffee Shop and Restaurant. 


Dancing 



nrinnriririnnrsinnnrtnnrairi'a'irs^ 



Phone WAInut 9853 



Al Franklin, Mgr. 



California Theatre 
Restaurant 

TWO FLOOR SHOWS NIGHTLY 
DELIGHTFUL ENTERTAINMENT 



DE LUXE DINNERS 

° 1650 POST STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

VuOOOCOOOOOOO OllOOOO OOOOOOOOOOOOO 000000? 



Page 52 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



AxigxKst, ]94y 



INSPECTOR WILLIAM McMAHON 

(Conlmued. from Page li) 

illegal in assembling a case against one under suspicion. 
As evidence of this fairness on his part toward the criminal 
it might be stated that on the occasion of his funeral over 
25 men he had been instrumental in sending to prison for 
law violations were present to pay a last tribute to one 
who played the game with them in a fair way, and one 
ex'Con called at the Robbery Detail and asked for and was 
given a photo of the dead inspector. The ex-con remarked 
as he tenderly wrapped the picture in an old newspaper: 
"He was a square guy." 



Phone DOuglas 95 14 



Farley and Tackney 



THE ANCHOR INN 

BEST WINES AND LIQUORS 
HOT LUNCH ALL DAY 



12 MISSION STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Phones Fillmore 7964 - ATwater 4077 



T. Minutoli, Mgr. 



SAN FRANCISCO TERRAZZO CO. 

TERRAZZO FLOORS - BRASS DIVIDERS 
STEPS AND CEMENT WORK 



3730 THIRD STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



DOuglas 9560 



Trig & Milt 



URSIN'S 

FINEST ASSORTMENT SCOTCHES AND BOURBON 



108 FIRST STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



CALIFASHIONS SPORTSWEAR CO. 

ANTHONY BROTHERS 
Creators of Original Sportswear in California for wear Everywhere 

1130 HOWARD STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



SYLVAIN COUIRAND 



Phone EXbrook 9664 



Normandie 



FRENCH RESTAURANT 



Cocktails - Dinners - Dancing 



1326 Powell Street 

NEAR BROADWAY 



San Francisco 



Home Cannins 

Helps 
TheWar Effort 



The summer fruit and vegetable sea- 
son now is in full sway. Prudent home- 
makers are busy canning fruits and 
vegetables for use in the coming winter 
months when these commodition will be 
scarce. This is not only wise but it is also 
patriotic. Home-canned products will be 
a big help to supplement the use of ra- 
tion books. 

Home-canning is not an easy chore. 
It requires the utmost in care and cau- 
tion, beginning with the selection of suit- 
able fruits and vegetables on through 
the different processes of cooking, steril- 
izing and sealing jars, until the final stor- 
age. Improper canning is a waste of 
critically needed food supplies. Also, it 
is dangerous to the family's health. 

If you will call at any of this com- 
pany's offices, you can obtain a free 
pamphlet offering the best in home- 
canning suggestions. It may serve you 
as a helpful guide. 




PACIFIC CAS AND ELECTRIC COMPANY 




PJ CE 8-845 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Phone GLencourt 5040 



:. o. 



We specialize in Maintenance, Re- 
pair and Operating Supplies for 
every purpose. Replacement parts 
for Automobiles, Trucks, Tractors 
and Marine Engines. Tools, Shop 
Equipment, and Heavy Hardware. 



GEO. A. KREPLIN CO. 

3060 BROADWAY 
OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 



KEIlog 2-9830 



"1249" Club 



Fred 8C Johanna Steinmann, Props. 



WINES AND BEER 



We Serve the Best Chili In Town 



A Rest Over Club - - - Stop In 



1249 E. 12th St. 



Oakland, Calif. 



Exbrook 5341 

TOM SIMON 
SALES CO. 

LADIES' HAND BAGS 
LADIES' AND MEN'S WALLETS 
COSTUME JEWELRY 

PHOTO FRAMES 

Wholesale Only 

86 Third Street 
San Francisco 3, California 



Phone ORdway 8191 

CHATTER BOX 
TAVERN 

Best In 
ENTERTAINMENT, FOOD 

REFRESHMENTS 

Excellent Supply of Fine Liquors 

Your Favorite Drink 

Made by Experts 

701 Geary Street 
San Francisco 



Sec. 562, P. L. & R. 

U. S. POSTAGE 

PAID 

San Francisco, Calif. 
Permit 3172 



Stohl. Nels S 

270 Claremont Blvd 
San Francisco, Cal 



j.j.J.4.J.AJ.XJ.J.J.J.4.-|.AJ.4.AJ.J.*J^J.**AJ^J..t.4.4.4.4.J.J.J.J^XJ.J.4.J.J.AJ^4.X*J.*J.4..>.J^J.XX4.XJ.XAXJ^J.XXXXXXAJ.J.J.J.J.AXX f 



Compliments of 



General Engineering 



and 



Dry dock Company 



of San Francisco 



j^^^^^^^^^^^^^^i.^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 



Greetings to S. F. Police 
The 

Alfred Hart 
Distributing Co. 

of 

San Francisco 

598 Po+rero Avenue 
San Francisco 10, Calif. 



Compliments of 



EXHIBIT FURNITURE 
STORES 



Located at 

1013 MARKET STREET 
1401 MARKET - 2225 MISSION STS. 

and 

2345 MISSION STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 



ALEXANDER ARMOS 

Co-owner 



'Sst~ 



^^-:vi^^ 



'^r?^PWsiM 






[F[^/i\Kl©D8(§(o 



AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



OF TH E 



OF CA LI FOR N I A 



Vote 

VES 



on 



IVmendment 

No. 4 



Give San Francisco Firemen and Police 
Officers decent salaries. 

During- the War they worked long hours to 
make up for the loss of over 400 members 
who entered the armed forces. 

REWARD THEM WITH MORE WAGES 

Give returning war veterans inducements 
to join these two important branches of the 
city's government, by assuring adequate 
pay for the hazardous duties they will be 
called on to perform. 

Endorsed by AFL and CIO Unions; leading 
civic organizations; Mayor Roger D. Lap- 
ham and Fire and Police Commissions. 



OCTOBER, 1945 



AN OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



FIKO LUGUGE SHOP 



"Everything In Leather Goods" . . . 
Shop at Fine's — And you buy the 
finest... Richmond's only exclusive lug- 
gage shop — Telephones: 1461... 6539 



1228 Macdonald Avenue, Rictimond, California 



Marjo^s 



Richmond's Most Modern 



Department Store 



1234 Macdonald Avenue 



Richmond, Calif. 



GAS 



LUBRICATION 




"Goes I long way to make friends" 

PASSENGER AND TRUCK TIRES 

RECAPPING - - - VULCANIZING 
In Our Modern Shop 



Brooker General Tire 

2124 MACDONALD AVENUE 
RICHMOND, CALIFORNIA 



October, 194? 



Featured in This Issue 

Page 

Charter Amendment No. 4, a Progressive 

Postwar Measure 3 

B31 Op\e L. Warner 

Inspectors Hughes and Husted Pensioned . . 5 

The Friday Holdup Men 6 

By Sergeant Harr\ ]. Majors 

Finger Records in Bible History 8 

By B. C. Bridges 

San Jose Police Department Makes Fine Record 

Under New Chief 10 

S. F. Police Officers Commended 12 

Nat Pieper Leaves FBI 13 

Richmond's Police Department War Record . 14 
By Clijf Sweetland 

Bay Counties" Peace Officers' Association . . H 

Some Are True and Some Are False — Rate 

Yourself 16 

Praise Letters to Chief Dullea 18 

Editorial Page 20 

Juvenile Baseball Team Formed 21 

Chief Holstrom on U. C. Faculty 24 

The Candid Friend 29 

By Opie L. Wanier 

Santa Rosa P. D. Has "Safe Burglary" Course }2 

San Francisco Police Changes 34 

Northern California Police Communications 

Association 38 

Wiring Squad Does Fine Job 44 

Chief Brown Heads San Jose State College 

Police Course 50 

S. F. P. D.'s New Officers 58 

Inside Specials Elect Officers 59 

Officers Who Are Retiring Under New Pension 

Plan 60 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 

Directory 



Page I 



I'he Editor is always pleased to consider articles suitable for publication. 
Contributions should preferably be typewritten, but where this is not pos- 
sible, copy should be clearly written. Contributions may be signed with a 
"nom de plume," but all articles must bear the name and address of the 
sender, which will be treated with the strictest confidence. The Editor 
will also be pleased to consider photographs of officers and of interesting 
•vents. Letters should be addressed to the Editor, 



SAN FRANCISCO POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Hall of Justice, Kearny and Washington Streets 
Telephones SUtter 2020 - 2030 
Radio Short 'Wave Call KGPD 



Mayor, Hon. Roger D. Lapham 



BOARD OF POLICE COMMISSIONERS 

Regular Meetings, Monday, 8:00 p. m Hall of Justice 

Hon. Jerd Sullivan, President Crocker First Nat'l Bank 

Hon. John Wesley Howell 240 Battery Street 

Hon. E. L. Turkington Furniture Mart Bldg. 

Captain Michael Gaifey, Secretary 
Room 104, Hall of Justice 



CHIEF OF POLICE Charles W. Dullea 

DEPUTY CHIEF OF POLICE Michael Riordan 

Dept. Sec'y Capt. John A. Engler Hall of Justice 

District Captains 

Central Joseph Walsh 635 Washington Street 

Southern Al. O'Brien Fourth and Clara Streets 

Mission Alexander McDaniel 3057 17th Street 

Northern John M. Sullivan 743 Ellis Street 

G. G. Park John A. Reed Stanyan opp. Waller 

Richmond F. J. McGuire 451 Sixth Ave. 

Ingleside....Al. Christiansen. ...Balboa Pk., nr. San Jose Ave. 

Taraval John J. Wade 2348 24th Avenue 

Potrero Leo J. Tackney 2300 Third Street 

Headquarters Patrick J. Murray Hall of Justice 

Traffic Bureau M. E. Mitchell 63 5 Washington St. 

Bur. Inspectors B. J. McDonald Hall of Justice 

Supervising Captain of Districts-M. GAFFEY..Hall of Justice 

Director 

Bureau of Personnel James L. English Hall of Justice 

Director - Bureau of 

Special Services.. ..Insp. Percy H. KENEALLY...Hall of Justice 

Director of 

Juvenile Bureau Geo. M. Healy 2745 Greenwich St. 

Director - Bureau of Criminal 

Information George Hippely Hall of Justice 

Property Clerk Patrick J. Murray Hall of Justice 

Insp. of Schools Traffic Control.. ..Insp. Byron Getchell 
Big Brother Bureau Lieut. Harry Reilly 



When In Trouhle Call S UttCY 20-20 

when in Doubt 



Alwavs At Your Service 



Page 2 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



MOLKENBUHR BROS. 

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"Efficient Police 

Make a City of 

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^Es PEACE OFFICERS* 




A Police News 

and Educational 

Magazine 

(Trade Maik Copyright) 



Vol. XXII 



OCTOBER, 1945 



No. 3 



Charter Amendment No- 4, a Progressive 
Post- War Measure of Great Value to S-F. 

By QpiE L, Warner 



Every measure submitte(d on election day for the iJeci' 
sion of the voters is important. Indeed, if our American 
people are to perpetuate their democratic form of govern- 
ment and the American-way-of-life as those concepts have 
been understood for more than a century and a half, care- 
ful consideration must be given to every proposal. It is 
evident that intelligent voting cannot take place unless the 
measure to be voted upon has been carefully analyzed 
and well understood. 

On the ballot on Tuesday, November 6, 194^, will 
appear a measure known as Charter Amendment No. 4 
which will carry a brief heading entitled "Parity of Com- 
pensation for Members of the Fire and Police Departments 
Based Upon Years of Service." If such a heading could tell 
the story in full, the problem would be a simple one; but, in 
reality, back of these words is a story of loyalty to the peo- 
ple of San Francisco, and the desire of responsible persons 
and organizations to give our city that kind of public serv- 
ice which will measure up to the progressive and crystalized 
thinking of the best minds in our nation. 

While the writer does not pretend to know all of the 
details of Fire Department life, he knows sufficient to con- 
vince him that it involves dangerous undertakings which 
require young, stalwart men possessed of courage and 
daring. Indeed, one has only to read the columns of the 
daily press to learn of the number of firemen injured in 
fire fighting and the fatalities which too frequently occur 
while they are engaged in the rescuing of persons threat- 
ened by the devouring flames of fire and the malignant 
fumes of various gases. 

With the Police Department the writer has lived for 
more than thirty years. He knows by personal knowledge 
of the heroic deeds performed by police officers who travel 
our highways at all hours of the day and night (and gen- 
erally alone), acting as the protecting shield to the law- 
abiding citizens against the assault of the thug and the 
criminal. 



Charter Amendment No. 4 should be studied by those 
interested in the progress of San Francisco. It provides 
in its terms for parity between both those highly-essen- 
tial protective municipal departments, and assures that 
reasonable adjustments in salaries and compensations shall 
be made for policemen and firemen. It should be said to 
the credit of Mayor Roger D. Lapham, to the gentlemen 
who make up the Police and Fire Commissions, to the 
members of our Board of Supervisors, and to the respon- 
sible business and labor leaders of this City and County, 
that they saw the wisdom of bringing about this parity and 
compensation adjustments. They manifested sound judg- 
ment by uniting both measures in one amendment so that 
the objective intended would unmistakably result. With 
the splendid spade work that has been already done and 
the consideration that has been given the amendment, it 
would seem to be a foregone conclusion that it will be 
adopted by the voters of this Municipality by an over- 
whelming majority. 

Both departments experienced trying times in the pro- 
tection of life and property in San Francisco since the 
fateful day of Pearl Harbor. Notwithstanding the fact 
that our population increased since December, 1941, by 
more than HO, 000 people; that San Francisco was located 
in an essential war zone wherein the enemy's attack should 
be anticipated and guarded against, the great undertaking 
imposed upon our policemen and firemen was loyally met 
and efficiently executed. Second only to the brave men who 
manned our fighting fronts, those "peace time" heroes 
acted their part nobly and well in spite of substantial 
reductions in their ranks. To their everlasting credit let 
it be said that they persevered during those fateful and 
history-making years and brought forth from army and 
navy leaders the highest praise. Not alone was appreciation 
lavishly expressed by responsible leaders of our armed 
forces, but ambassadors and ministers of friendly nations 
who had occasion to come to San Francisco, were equally 
loud in their praise for the co-operation given them and 



Page 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



October, ]94J 



the courteous treatment received hy them at the hands of 
our San Francisco policemen. 

The matters already stated, while essential in themselves 
and worthy of high commendation, deal only with days 
which are now passed into history. Our planning for the 
future welfare of San Francisco must receive the same 
clear-cut, careful, well-reasoned analysis that army and 
navy strategists had to evolve in bringing about the defeat 
of our axis enemies. In other words, if San Francisco is to 
continue its progressive, well-balanced program, then it is 
essential that the highest type of young, healthy, robust, 
well-educated and intelligent men be attracted to our police 
and fire departments. At present, both departments are 
seriously undermanned. Our Civil Service Commission, 
however, is already laying plans so that examinations will 
be held within a reasonable time for permanent appoint- 
ments in both departments. The returning war veterans 
who have been trained in the hardships of war and in the 
intelligent prosecution of hazardous assignments, are al- 
ready preparing to take civil service examinations to es- 
tablish their eligibility for appointments in these depart- 
ments. 

Wisely, of course, our charter sets forth the qualifica- 
tions which recruits for these departments must possess. 
With our young men coming back from the service of the 
armed personnel, we can look forward to seeing several 
hundred of them in the ranks of our Police and Fire De- 
partments. What an advantage it will be for our returning 
veterans that hundreds of jobs will be available to them 
in both of these responsible departments. In other words, 
by Charter Amendment No. 4 we invite them to take 
up, in civilian life, a professional career in the most haz- 
ardovs of public-service occupations, and we feel satisfied 
that with the inducements which are set forth in that 
amendment thev will serve San Francisco with the same 
real, the same lovalty. and the same efficiency they gave 
Uncle Sam in our fsr-flung world-wide battlefields. 

For the good of San Francisco, for its future progress, 
for the benefit of our returning veterans, for the protection 
of our homes and the welfare of our families, this journal 
recommends the study of charter amendment No. 4, and 
an overwhelming YES VOTE on it on Tuesday, November 
6, 1945. 



STATE PEACE OFFICERS MEET 
IN SALINAS 

As this edition of the Police and Peace Officers' Journal 
goes to press the Stth annual convention of the Peace 
Officers" Association of the State of California is preparing 
to hold its 2 1th meet at Salinas. The convention was in ses- 
sion on October 8 and 10, and the twice-a-day sessions 
were conducted in the Womens" Civic Club. 

Chief Charles W. Dullea, the current president, who 
also presided at the conference held in Fresno last year 
because of the inability of Sheriff Carl Rayburn of Riv- 
erside to be present, will preside over the coming meeting. 

Chief Dulica and Secretary-Treasurer James T. Drew 
have prepared a fine program for this occasion, covering 



such topics as care by peace officers of returning veterans, 
the return of Japanese who were sent to relocation centers 
at the outbreak of war, and the all important matter of 
traffic control. 

Governor Earl Warren, Attorney General Robert Ken- 
ny, Chief Special Agent John W. Vincent, recently placed 
in charge of the FBI headquarters in San Francisco, Super- 
vising Agent William A. Merrill, U. S. Secret Service of 




Chief Charles W. Dullea 
President. California Peace Oflicers' Association 

this area; Chief E, Raymond Cato, California Highway 
Patrol, and Dillon S. Meyer, director of War Relocation 
Authority, addressed the convention. 

Panel discusssions were held on "Post War Traffic 
Problems," with Chief Cato heading the panel; "What 
Can Peace Officers Do to Help Returning Veterans," in 
charge of Sheriff Eugene Biscailus of Los Angeles, and 
"Welfare, Disability and Pensions," in charge of Chief 
Howard A. Zink, Palo Alto. 

It is reported that Chief Harold A. Vogelsang, of Stock- 
ton, second vice president will step aside from his office 
because of pressing police business in his busy city. 

The annual banquet will be held on Tuesd.iy night with 
Judge Henry G. Jorgensen the principal speaker. 

Chief George C. Weight, of Salinas has made extraor- 
dinary plans to make this first post-war convention an 
outstanding success, and has listed many features to 
entertain the many peace officers who have sfgnified their 
intention to be present. 

A committee headed by Chief Weight's wife saw that 
the women folks of the visitors had plenty of entertainment 
during their three days' stay. 

Besides Chief Dullea and Chief Vogelsang, the pres- 
ent officers of the association are: 

Sheriff George J. Overholt, Fresno, first vice-president. 

Sheriff Howard P. Gleason, Alameda, third vice-presi- 
dent. 

Chief C. B. Horrall, fourth vice-president. 

Sheriff Daniel C. Murphy, sergeant-at-arms. 

Former Chief James T. Drew, of Oakland, secretary- 
treasurer. 

A full account of the Salinas meeting will be presented 
in the November issue of the Police Journal. 



October, 1945 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 5 



Inspectors Hughes and Husted Pensioned 



Among the first to take advantage of the pension privi- 
leges under the charter amendment voted last November 
were two important members of the Bureau of Inspectors. 
They are Inspector Richard O. Hughes, at the time of re- 
tirement head of the Burglar>' Detail, and Harry F. Husted, 
head of the Homicide Detail. 

To replace these men Inspector James Johnson was put 
in charge of the Burglary Detail, and Inspector Al Corrasa 




Richard O. Hughes 

given Harry Husted's place on the Homicide Detail. 

The two retired Inspectors have had a long and colorful 
career as police officers, and they have done more than 
their share to build up the fine reputation the San Fran- 
cisco Police Department enjoys today, for law enforce- 
ment. 

Inspector "Dick" Hughes, as he is known to his legion 
of friends was born in County Mayo, Ireland, and came 
to this country while a very young lad. His family settled 
in San Francisco, where young Hughes got his education. 
When he was 24 years of age he took the police examina- 
tion, and on May 25, 1911, was sworn in as a member of 
the San Francisco Police Department and he donned his 
police uniform on June 1, 1911, being assigned to Com- 
pany F. Here he distinguished himself as but few rookie 
policemen have the opportunity of doing. 

In the late months of 1912 and the early months of 
1913 a gang of burglars was tearing up the residential dis- 
trict of the Park, Richmond and the old Western Addi- 
tion. The operators had a unique pattern in their work, 
as they coniined all their larcenous endeavors to the first 
floor of flats, apartments and residences. It was evident to 
the heads of the Police Department that the burglar or 
burglars were experienced hands, and it was likewise evi- 
dent that they knew how to dispose of loot for they left 
no clues of "fenced" stolen goods. 

However, as it most always does, the brains of this wave 
of burglaries, made a mistake. 



It was developed after his arrest that he would case a 
number of places he intended to ply his evil trade, get the 
names of all addressees nearby, and then start ringing door- 
bells. If someone appeared in answer to his ring he would 
ask if this was where Mr. So and So lived, and when in- 
formed it was not, but the party he mentioned lived a 
couple of doors away, he politely apologized for his error 
and bowed himself out. If no one answered his doorbell 
ring he proceeded to jimmy the window or door, go in 
and ransack every place where money or valuables could 
be hidden. He never went above the first floor. 

On this day when Dick Hughes changed the career of 
this methodical burglar, he rang a door bell, and getting 
no response he entered it in his usual way. He was going 
through the apartment, when the woman occupying it re- 
turned through a back door, which she found open. She 
knew she had closed it a short time before. As she entered 
the place she saw a well-dressed young man ransacking her 
effects. She grabbed an ironmg board and hit him over the 
head. The man rushed out the front door, right into the 




Harry F. Husted 

path of Patrolman Richard Hughes, who was patroling 
his beat at the time. He ordered the fleeing man to halt and 
he refused to comply with the command. Officer Hughes 
drew his revolver and let him have a couple of slugs, which 
hit the suspect in the leg and stomach. He gave up. 

He was taken to the Park Hospital where it was found 
his name was Owen Conn, he refused to do any talking 
at first, but in a very short time the Detectives assigned 
to take over, gathered so much evidence on the man that 
he co-operated to such an extent that over a hundred thou- 
sand dollars worth of loot was recovered. His lady com- 
panion who posed as his wife was booked. It was dis- 
covered that he had served time in New York and Illinois 
(Continued on page 46) 



Page 6 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 

The Friday Holdup Men 

By Sergeant Harry J. Majors, Rohhery DetaiJ, San Francisco Police Department 



October, 1945 



Lieutenant James C. Malloy, who was then in charge 
of the Robbery Detail, knew that he was not dealing with 
a pair of youthful bandits, but a pair of hardened criminals 
— ex-convicts. But who were they and what penitentiary 
they had been released from was the problem confronting 




Sergeant Harry Majors 

the Robbery Detail. We had the victims look over a lot 
of pictures in the Robbery Detail hoping that they might 
identify the suspects and give us a line as to whom we 
were looking for. Being that the hats were evidently 
purchased in the northwest, we felt that if they were ex- 
cons we were dealing with, they may have come out of a 
penitentiary in Washington. However, no identifications 
were made of any suspects. But we got a pretty good break 
in the case on April 11, 1944. We received an anonymous 
phone call from some woman. She said that the proprietor 
of a hotel on Leavenworth street packs a .45 automatic 
with him at all times and when he returns to the hotel he 
hides the gun in the linen closet. This woman said the 
man's name was Floyd Richardson and that he was on 
parole from Washington State Penitentiary. Well, this 
information looked pretty good. Floyd Richardson was 
no stranger to the members of the Robbery Detail — he 
had committed a reign of terror in holdups in San Fran- 
cisco many years before serving a life term in the State 
Penitentiary' at Walla Walla, Washington, for robberies 
committed in that state, and also the shooting of a police 
officer in Seattle, Wash. With this information at hand. 
Lieutenant Malloy and members of the Robbery Detail 
decided it would be interesting to pay Floyd a visit and 
find out just what he was doing. With Inspectors 0'Lear>' 
Butz, Murphy, Doherty, McCann, Wafer and Reznik, 
he descended on the premises at 329 Leavenworth Street. 
He knew if Richardson was cornered he would shoot and 



he wanted to be prepared for him with enough help in 
case he made a break. With a number of men placed near 
the entrance and back of the hotel, he and Inspector Mc- 
Cann entered the dreary-looking cheap hotel. The entrance 
way was very dark and the stairs leading to the second 
floor were poorly lighted. No one appeared to be about the 
premises. It was one of those cheap rooming houses where 
no one seemed to be about that had any authority. They 
knocked on the doors on the first floor but received no 
response. Then they ascended to the next or top floor. 
There they knocked on a door and a woman answered. 
They immediately gained entrance to the roorn and found 
three women present. They told these women they were 
from the Robbery Detail and inquired as to Floyd Rich- 
ardson. Malloy and McCann learned from the women that 
their quarry had just left the building. McCann then said : 
"Lieutenant, it looks like our friend Floyd has been tipped 
off." 

A further chat with the girls, they soon learned that 
Floyd Richardson had established himself as proprietor 
of the hotel several months previous and he had inveigled 
the girls to work as prostitutes for him. It seems that in 
the lives of all criminals there is the jealously of some 
woman in the background and that generally brings about 
their downfall, and in this case it appears that the same 
thing occurred. Lieutenant Malloy then ordered a com- 
plete and thorough search of the premises by the mem- 




LlEUTENANT JaMES MaLLOY 

bers as he felt that Richardson must have been pretty { 
"hot" in taking it on the lam so quickly. The search proved 
fruitful as they found the religious medals taken from the 
victims in the White House Cleaners robbery in Rich- 
ardson's room. Then, in searching the dark basement of : 
the rooming house they noticed some partially burned 



October, 194S 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



Page 7 



papers were thrown on the floor. Examination of these 
burned papers indicated they were portions of burned 
checks. "We're getting somewhere now," remarked Lieu- 
tenant Malloy — "these medals and checks came from their 
last job." Inspector McCann immediately sent for pictures 
of Richardson. When they arrived they were shown to 
Mr. Marty, his daughter and Mr. Collins, and they defi- 




LlEUTENANT DaNIEL McKlEMM 

nitely stated that Richardson was one of the pair that 
robbed them. They also identified the religious medals as 
their own as well. Floyd Richardson was a young man 
when the Robbery Detail members last saw him. According 
to his latest pictures it seemed that Richardson had changed 
in appearance a lot since the boys last saw him. He appear- 
ed quite a bit older — 45 to be exact, and his hair was get- 
ting sparse on top and a little grey at the temples. 

Subsequent checks were made at 329 Leavenworth 
Street, but the wary ex-con never returned. The girls were 
booked as vagrants and later released. One of these girls, 
who probably gave the first tip on Richardson, and who 
was trying to break away from her life of ill-fame at the 
hotel, told of the life of debauchery that existed for her 
and the other two women. She also told of another man 
that was very friendly with Richardson and visited him at 
the hotel frequently. This was no doubt the partner of 
Richardson, but from descriptions given we could not de- 
termine who he was or where he was from. He was a very 
secretive person and kept pretty much to himself. The 
girls couldn't tell us a very great deal about him, only that 
he looked like an ex-con too. 

Members of the Robbery Detail were sent out by Lieu- 
tenant Malloy to scour the entire underworld haunts where 
Richardson was known to frequent, particularly taverns 
in the neighborhood of his hotel business, as we learned 
that Floyd had acquired a "bar-room tan," and was known 
to be a heavy drinker. Inspectors McCann and McMahon 
being assigned to the White House Cleaners case took up 
the hunt for Richardson. However,unfortunately a few 
weeks later "Bill" McMahon took seriously ill. He had been 
the work horse of the Robbery Detail for many years. 



"Bill" had worked on some mighty big cases on the detail 
during his prime and turned in some mighty good pinches 
The long years of hard work on the detail had taken its 
toll of his health and he is still under the doctor's care. 

Rumors came back from the underworld that Rich- 
ardson was out "gunning" for McCann and that McCann 
better have his gun handy as there would be some fast 
shooting when and if they should meet. He also dropped 
word here and there that McCann better look out if he 
knew what was good for him. Well, to a veteran inspector 
of police like McCann, this only added fuel to the fire, and 
Frank was more than ever determined to land Richardson 
behind the bars. The whole west coast and larger cities 
of the east were circulari:;ed with pictures and descriptions 
of Richardson, with the result that the department was 
flooded with varieties of information that Richardson was 
seen in Los Angeles, Tacoma, Seattle, Portland, and other 
Pacific Coast cities. Richardson was a very cagey criminal. 
However, Richardson doubled back on his trail. He still 
had a yen for one of the blonde babes he had at the Klon- 
dike Hotel. Through various tips we learned that Rich- 
ardson had gone north to meet his pal and they had re- 
turned and was somewhere in San Francisco. We then 
learned that he had contacted his beautiful blonde named 
"Boots" and had forced her by threatening her life to 
"shack" up with him in an apartment here in San Fran- 
cisco. We ran down every lead and finally learned of the 
address where he was supposed to be staying. A posse 
headed by Lieut. Malloy rushed out to find that the elusive 
Floyd had just checked out. A further search turned up 




Inspector Frank McCann 

"Boots" and she told of how she was forced through fear 
to live with Richardson for about a week and the terrible 
ordeals she went through while with him at this address 
on Steiner Street. However, no further information de- 
veloped as to where our man had gone. He had evidently 
left the city again. 

Well, at least the Robbery Detail members knew one of 
f Contmued on page 41 I 



Page 8 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



October, 194 J 



Finger Records in Bible History 

By B. C. Bridges, Superintendent, Bureau of Identification, Alameda Police Department 



The author of the accompanying article, which was 
written for the San Francisco Police Journal, is an inter- 
nationally recognized expert in identification. He is the 
author of the book, "Practical Fingerprinting," one of the 
most complete authoritative and up-to-date works on fin- 
gerprinting, published by Funk and Wagnalls Co., New 
York. 



(All rights reserved bv the author) 

There is little doubt that the pseudo-science of Chiro- 
mancy, or Palmistry, has had its numerous adherents 
for so many centuries that its origin now is a matter of 
conjecture. Its recorded existence dates thousands of years 
before the Christian era, in Egypt, Assyria, and Babylonia, 




SuPT. B. C. Bridges 

as well as in many other countries. In China, patterns of 
the feet also were included for consideration. 

Many of its principles, and especially the older methods, 
placed stress upon the general shape, size, and outline 
of the hand, but the majority of acclaim is with the super- 
ficial lines that crease the palm surfaces, usually as a re- 
sult of occupation, habit, or bodily condition. 

Especially did this dissimulation flourish during Bible 
days, when seer and soothsayer professed the facile ability 
to reveal past, present, and future by peering into a palm. 
Belief that the mechanics of anatomical arrangement could 
have psychic or occult meaning is fantastic imagination. 
Since man is a free moral agent, exact prediction of his 
unpredictable behaviour is flatly impossible; but even 
basic truths sometimes may find expression in perversion 
and quackery is ever apt to ape the feats of science. It is 
more than probable that the obscure birth of palmistry 
succeeded the research of some forgotten scientist, who had 



developed the skill to read m skin designs the indications 
of race, age, and sex, and had learned to associate cer- 
tain habitual behaviour patterns with the markings on 
the epidermis. Science of today sees exterior features 
on man's body which stamp him for what he is, and fre- 
quently these are labeled in the skin. 

It is quite natural to expect that all living things should 
show in outward appearance some suggestion of their 
nature. Class characteristics have long identified and dis- 
tinguished the various generic groups, while each of their 
included units is marked inevitably by individual peculiari- 
ties. In varying degrees, proficiency to read and interpret 
these indices has long been man's possession. 

In the thirteenth chapter of Jeremiah, the twenty-third 
verse reads: "Can the Ethiopian change his skin, or the 
leopard his spots? Then may ye also do good, that are 
accustomed to do evil," while the the thirteenth chapter 
of Job offers suggestive evidence in the twenty-seventh 
verse, which attests: "Thou puttest my feet also in the 
stocks, and lookest narrowly unto all my paths; thou 
settest a print upon the heels of my feet." The reasonable 
conclusion here implied is a recognition of man's latent 
characteristics as suggested by his skin patterns; and if 
additional proof be wanting, affirmation is given in the 
thirty-seventh chapter of Job, the seventh verse: "He 
sealeth up the hand of man; that all men may know his 
work." The same implication is contained in the sixteenth 
verse of the thirteenth chapter of Revelations: "...he 
causeth all, both small and great, rich and poor, free and 
bond, to receive a mark in their right hand . . ." 

In the face of such ample confirmation, there is no choice 
but to agree that at least some of the biological aspects 
of skin patterns were familiar to those savants of Bible 
history. 

Certain of the episodes described in gospel narrative 
apparently involve the superhuman, and in consequence 
are disclaimed by skeptics; and for many such, it must be 
admitted that an acceptable explanation is not available. 
However, it must be remembered that the chronicles, as 
well as the historians responsible for them, belonged to 
an age when superstition was quick to invest even factual 
happenings with portent or supernatural significance. 

It is probable that were all the truth revealed, many 
of the Bible tales which now seem so bewildering, would 
he resolved in simple terms. The writers of those early 
texts prepared and edited their copy for the current con- 
sideration of communicants who were inherently credu- 
lous and frequently illiterate. Under those circumstances, 
pertinent points often could be objectified best in parable 
or allegory. Thus, highly-colored word pictures resulted. 

Another factor not to be ignored is the mechanical de- 
ception then so frequently employed to perform purport- 
edly supernatural manifestations. Salutory reactions re- 
sulted from altar fires mysteriously ignited, or a brazen 



October, 1945 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 9 



idol that sometimes moved and spoke. And with those 
famed events which held their claim to unseen psychic 
forces, comes realisation of their far outrivaling by the 
more recent devices and effects in light and sound and 
chemistry ot modern commercial magic. Thus, logic would 
suggest that those olden tales be judged not over-hastily. 

A prominent display of the seemingly-occult in Bible 
drama, and one in which the foremost role was played 
by hands and fingers, is related in the Book of Daniel, 
and deals with King Belshazzar. A son of Evil-Merodach, 
and grandson of the great Nebuchadnezzar, Belshazzar 
reigned as king in luxury-famed Babylon at a time near 
the middle of the first millennium B. C. Historians depict 
him as a barbarous and jealous tyrant, notorious for mis- 
conduct. Even as a ruler, his ill-behavior must have been 
outstanding to justify especial recognition in a kingdom 
so notorious for its iniquity. 

The tale records that his most heinous and last offense 
was committed during the revels of a palace feast. This 
orgy evidently was one of considerable importance; in- 
cluded as guests were "a thousand of his lords" and their 
consorts, together with the many female members of the 
king's more intimate domestic household. 

When the hectic merriment was at its height, the king 
provided a surprise element for the entertainment by order- 
ing in some unusual table-service, namely, certain golden 
vessels of most holy and religious significance. Although 
originally these had been plundered from the sacred temple 
at Jerusalem, his illustrious grandparent, and even his un- 
enviably-reputed father, had left them unprofaned in 
the palace vaults. But this gala occasion was indeed a night 
of nights, and Belshazzar must needs display supreme 
audacity. 

The hallowed relics were brought forth, and summarily 
given over to promiscuous and dishonoring hands. But 
not content with mere defilement of the golden goblets, 
the royal tipplers reviled the deity in whose worship the 
vessels had found service. . . "They praised the gods of 
gold, silver, brass, iron and stone; but tf^ God in whose 
hand was their breath, and whose were all their ways, 
they praised or glorified not." 

The tale then relates that . . . "In the same hour came 
forth the fingers of a man's hand, and wrote over against 
the candlestick upon the plaster of the wall of the king's 
palace, and the king saw the part of the hand that wrote." 

This manifestation filled the revelers with dismay and 
consternation; the king was panic-stricken, so that . . ."the 
joints of his loins were loosened . . . and his knees smote 
together ..." 

None present could read the aminous writing; so the 
king sent for his astrologers, but they too were powerless 
to aid him. It was at this point that the king's grandmother 
entered the hall, and did her utmost to soothe the troubled 
monarch. Also, she advised that he seek counsel of the 
prophet Daniel. Since Daniel had withdrawn into private 
life upon the death of Nebuchadnezzar, he had little con- 
tact with the palace activities, or with the court sooth- 
sayers, and consequently had not been among those who 



first summoned the king. However, Daniel was called, 
and when he stood before Belshazzar, the monarch ac- 
knowledged Daniel's accomplishments, and offered a rich 
reward for an interpretation of the writing. 

The other wise men had found the tracings cryptic, 
not because of the language involved, which was Chal- 
dean, but for the reason that the symbols used were of 
the primitive Hebrew, totally different from the Chaldee, 
being the original form from which the Samaritan char- 
acters were developed. 

Waiving the proffered honors and rewards, the vener- 
able prophet addressed his ruler: "Thy gifts be to thy- 
self, and give thy rewards to another; nevertheless I will 
read the writing for the king." However, he first sternly 
reprimanded the monarch for his delinquency and disre- 
gard for Nebuchadnezzar's policies, adding with grim 
emphasis, "And thou, his grandson, O Belshazzar, hast 
not humbled thy heart, although thou knewest all this." 

He then read the inscription; "Mene, Mene, Tekel, 
Upharsin," and disclosed its direful meaning: "God has 
numbered the days of thy reign, and they are finished. 
Thou has been weighed in the balance, and found wanting. 
Thy kingdom will be taken from thee and divided between 
the Medes and the Persians." 

The king heard this terrible sentence in silence. 

The historian adds, with great conciseness, "That same 
night was Belshazzar, king of the Chaldeans, slain." This 
was in the fifth year of his reign, .S.SJ B. C. The Bible 
does not furnish the details of Belshazzars death, but 
from other sources, it is learned that he was assassinated 
through the conspiracy of two of his nobles, who had 
just reason to despise him. 

The Gospel relates that, following the death of Bel- 
shazzar, "Darius, the Mede, took the kingdom." In fact, 
the family of Nebuchadnezzar being e.\tinct, Cyaxares, 
or to give him his scriptural name, Darius, who was brother 
of the queen-mother and next of kin on her side, had the 
most obvious right to the vacant throne; and while his 
power was so great as to over-awe all competition, the 
express indication of him by the prophet in his interpre- 
tation of the inscription, was calculated to have much 
weight with all concerned, and indeed with the whole 
nation. Daniel naturally came into high favor with Darius, 
to whose accession he had so materially contributed. 

Thus were the passing of Belshazzar and the advance- 
ment of Darius profoundly influenced by the "writing on 
the wall"; but as to the true cause of those ghostly and 
important traceries, no doubt there is still a diversity of 
opinion. Some there are who inevitably will hold the 
manifestation to be of divine origin; while others may can- 
nily suspect some sly but most effective chicanery. Be that 
as it may, the fact remains that here again the hand of 
Fate stretched forth to touch Time's unwinding scroll, 
and the lives and destinies of countless mortal creatures 
were changed by finger-records. 

It is indeed interesting to note, throughout the endless 
and ever-turning pages of history, how frequently it hap- 
pens that a delinquent conscience is responsible for bene- 
(Contintied on page 36) 



Page W 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



October. 194S 



San Jose Police Department Makes Fine 
Record Under New Chief 



During the 16 months and more that Chief William 
C. Brown has been in command of the San Jose Police 
Department, he has demonstrated that the powers that 
be made no mistake in placing him in that position, upon 
the retirement of veteran Chief J. N. Black. 

Since he took over the direction of the Police Depart- 
ment he has made numerous changes designed to make his 
force of eighty men and one woman matron, produce the 
maximum of police protection for the people who make 
up the population of San Jose. These changes together with 
his over 21 years as a member of the Department and his 
thorough knowledge of police administration, coupled with 
the loyalty of those who serve under him, has brought to 
the big Santa Clara valley city as efficient law enforcement 
as it is possible to produce. 

Since a year ago last May when he was promoted from 




Chief William C. Brown 

Captain of Detectives to the top spot, there has not been 
a murder. There has been no important robberies, most 
of them being the usual stick-up of citizens by small-time 
operators. The loss occasioned by these robberies has been 
remarkably small. 

His officers on the street and in the Detective Bureau 
have held down burglaries to a comparative minimum 
figure. 

Among the leading changes he has made is the forma- 
tion of an Automobile Accident Bureau. This new unit 
is made up of six experienced men, trained in investigat- 
ing all traffic accidents, getting statements from all parties 
involved, making measurements of tire marks, taking pic- 
tures of smashups and presenting a complete report of their 
findings and offering ideas as to who was the cause of 
such accident. 



The detail works under the direction of Sergeant M. A. 
Horbeck, who has had considerable experience in traffic 
control in his native city, and took the traffic course in 




Captain B. L. Collins 

the Northwestern University, sponsored by the National 
Safety Council, graduating in 1943. His squad is doing 
swell work in the new assignment. 

Also important in changes made under Chief Brown 




Captain Thomas Short 



is the improvement of the Bicycle Detail. This is a most 
important branch of the service, the work of the bureau 
was increased overwhelmingly during the war when gaso- 
line was a scare commodity, and people took to bicycles 



October, 1945 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page n 



to get around. The Detail issues licenses for over 7,000 
bicycles. It is charged with taking reports of stolen bikes 
and handles the work of recovering those illegally taken. 

Under Chief Brown the Auxiliary Police Force, made up 
of 225 public-spirited citizens, who have given unstintingly 




Sergeant M. A. Hornbeck 

of their time and talents to help the regular enforcement 
officers, has been brought to a high state of perfection, 
and the great work this volunteer organization has done 
would fill a book. It is a tribute these men have for the 
appreciation of the paid police officers for their effort that 
they have formed themselves into a permanent organiza- 




Traffic Officer E. S. Prana 

tion, and will meet regularly in the years that follow the 
declaration of the end of the war. 

During the three days celebration of V-J the Auxiliary 
Police turned out in force and put in long hours assisting 
the Police Department, and as a result of their presence 
the celebration was held under control and not an untow- 



ard act was reported during the festivities. 

Officer Edward Prana has been in charge of the Auxil- 
iary Police since it was organized. 

The San Jose Police Department lost thirteen men to 
the war services of the country, one having returned to 
the job he left. The vacancies occasioned by the enlistment 
of these men have been filled and in addition the city coun- 
cil has given Chief Brown ten additional men bringing the 
personnel to 80 members. 

In keeping with this increase Chief Brown has been 
given an additional captain. The new captain is Bartholo- 
mew Collins, promoted from detective. Captain Collins 
joined the force on August 3, 1935, and was appointed 
to his new post on June I of this year. When he was ele- 
vated he was in charge of the Burglary Detail of the 
Detective Bureau and he and his force of officers kept the 
burglary kicks pretty nearly completely cleaned up. 

The new captain has been placed in charge of the 
night activities of the Department. 

Captain E. A. Strough is still in charge of the Traffic 




Sergeant J. M. Carter 

Bureau and the ten men under him keep the heavy auto- 
motive traffic that operates over the business and tree-lined 
residential district streets under splendid control. 

Captain of Detectives R. J. Blackmore and the men 
detailed with him have done their share in keeping crooks 
out of San Jose, and have contributed their share of barley 
sack weavers and rock breakers to our penal institutions. 

Captain Thomas Short, the Department's Day Captain 
keeps the men on the street on their toes and gives the 
citizenry a feeling of security by the careful patrol, by foot 
and two-way radio equipped prowl cars, there being four- 
teen such cars engaged in this work. 

Sergeant Joseph M. Carter, secretary to Chief Brown, 
is showing the results of his experience as a police officer 
and the training he got in a two-year course in the San 
Jose State College Police Training course. 

Chief Brown has most of his departments on the first 
(Continued on page SO) 



Page 12 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



October, 1945 



San Francisco Police Officers Commended 



The following reports have been submitted to Chief 
Dullea and the officers concerned personally commended 
by their respective Captains, for the fine police service ren- 
dered and for their attention to duty, as outlined herein : 

* ^ * 

OFFICER EMMETT COTTRELL 
COMMENDED 

The following is a copy of a report submitted by Captain 
Leo J. Tackney, (formerly of Co. D), to Chief Charles 
W. Dullea, recommending commendation of Officer Em- 
mett Cottrell, Mission Police District, for his efficient 
police work and attention to duty in that district which 
has been approved by the Chief; and Officer Emmett 
Cottrell was commended by his captain. Captain A. E. Mc- 
Daniell, now commanding Co. D, for services performed 
as outlined in the following: 

"I wish to call your attention to the Miscellaneous Re- 
ports submitted by Officer Emmett Cottrell, Co. D, dated 
Saturday, June 16th, 194^, in which four (4) boys were 
arrested as suspects for syphoning gasoline from automo- 
biles. These boys were suspected earlier in the morning 
and escaped and were later apprehended by Officer Cot- 
trell, who continued his investigation.. The substance of 
these reports show that at 4:.^0 a.m., Sunday June 17th, 
194>, five young men and boys were arrested and charged 
with vagrancy and enroute to Sacramento by said officer. 
They were suspected of syphoning gasoline and possible 
automobile theft. One suspect had in his possession a stolen 
war bond belonging to Mrs. Bernstein, 401 Pacheco Street, 
whose place was recently burglarized. This boy was sus- 
pected as a burglar. 

"For this alertness and attention to duty in making 

these arrests Officer Cottrell has no doubt prevented 

further law violations on the part of these boys and young 

men. Other activities over the week-end of June 16th, 

1945, include the arrest of 24 persons for violating Section 

152 of the Police Code. I therefore recommend that Officer 

Cottrell be commended by you in orders for this efficient 

police service. t t t. i 

Leo J. lackney. 

Captain of Police, No. 868." 



"At 1:4J a.m., Thursday, July 26th, Sergeant Harold 
Anderson, Officers Barnaby O'Leary, Edward Preston 
and Leslie Conlan, Central Police Station, responded to 
a radio call, to 220 Turk Street, that a burglar alarm was 
ringing there. On their arrival. Sergeant Anderson had 
the building surrounded and apprehended one Ignatius 
Balisteri, as he was climbing out of a rear window of the 
premises. The officers made a search of the premises and 
no other person was found; it was discovered that the 
suspect had gained entrance by removing the glass from 
a window and then forcing a door. The premises entered, 
the Dunbar Tavern, were carefully checked and the man- 
ager contacted. The manager came to the scene and stated 
that nothing had been taken but the cash registers had been 



opened. On questioning the suspect, he stated that he had 
entered the premises with the intent of removing liquor. 
Suspect was booked at the City Prison on a charge of 'Sus- 
picion of Burglary'. I therefore recommend that the above 
named officers he commended by you in Special Orders for 
their attentiveness to duty, their alertness and the manner 
in which the case was handled. 

Joseph M. Walsh, 
Captain of Police, Co. A". 
* * * 

"I wish to apprise you of the following facts, connected 
with the arrest of Donald L. Voss, by Officer Ward H. 
Hanes, Accident Prevention Bureau. In the arrest, for Hit 
and Run, in which Jack Solberg, 924 Moscow Street, was 
seriously injured, the driver might have escaped detec- 
tion, had not Officer Hanes possessed the ability of a good 
investigator. This officer is to be commended for the ex- 
cellent manner in which he covered the various details con- 
nected with this hit and run automobile accident, having 
very little evidence outside of a piece of chrome moulding, 
found at the scene of the accident, size, 14J^"xJ/2", to 
work with. His report shows that he did a splendid job 
of investigation and it is through his efi^orts that this case 
was brought to a successful conclusion with the party re- 
sponsible apprehended, along with the necessary statements 
which places his case complete and ready for trial. I want 
to commend Officer Hanes for his abilit>' to solve the case 
which started with very little hope. The co-operation of 
Lieutenant Higgins, Sergeant Moody and Officer Mc- 
Laughlin is not to be overlooked for their part in the ap- 
prehension, which displays good team work. 

Captain of Police, 
Michael E. Mitchell, 
Commanding Co. K." 



"At 4:35 p.m., July 20th, Officer Harold L. Walker, 
while enroute to the Hall of Justice in Radio Unit No. 2, 
noticed an automobile being driven in a reckless manner at 
Bush Street and Van Ness Avenue. He pursued and over- 
took this car which was occupied by two U. S. sailors, 
whom he took to the Northern Station. They had stolen 
the car and were booked accordingly. This arrest shows an 
intelligent application of good police sense and it is only 
one of many instances in which Officer Walker has dem- 
onstrated devotion to duty. 

About 6 p.m., of above date, a call was received from 
3277 Pacific Avenue, concerning a burglary. Officer Walk- 
er responded and the complainant told him that he had 
caught two boys who had admitted having entered the 
house. He took the names of these boys, which they gave 
as Clarence Stone, 434 5th Ave., and Donald Ulrich, 1914 
46th Avenue. He (the complainant) released them as noth- 
ing was missing from his home. Officer Walker then went 
to 434 .Sth Avenue and v^^is informed by the owner of the 
property that Clarence Stone did not live there and was 
f'ContiTitied on page iO) 



October, 1945 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page n 



Nat Pi 



leper 

Bv Opie L. Warner 



eaves 



FBI 



Nat J. L. Pieper, Chief Special Agent of the Federal 
Bureau of Investigation in the San Francisco district for 
over eight years, has resigned the position he has so effici- 
ently filled prior to and during the war years. His resigna- 
tion was reluctantly accepted by Director John Edgar 
Hoover of the FBI, effective September 15. 

Special Agent John W. Vincent, from the New York 




N. J. L. Pieper 

District has been appointed to fill the vacancy occasioned 
by the resignation of Chief Pieper. 

No law enforcement officer ever came to this state 
with more enthusiasm, more experience, or more under- 
standing of what his responsibilities and his duties were, 
than Nat Pieper. Through his energetic approach to every 
case assigned to him, by his pleasing personality and his 
ability to make friends he has placed the San Francisco 
office of the FBI in closer harmony with the state, county, 
city and town peace officers from the District Attorney, 
Sheriff and Chief of Police to the smallest police districts. 
He has by his sincerity and his ever willingness to lend the 
resources of the great Federal Bureau of Investigation in 
the solution of any and all crimes presented, he has done 
much to weld all these agencies into one great force to 
combat crime. 

During the war years he faced great problems that called 
for the expenditure of hours upon hours of time and 
energy and with his able force of special agents he built 
up a reputation of outsmarting the saboteurs, the fifth 
columnists, the alien enemies who settled in this section 
with the intent of giving aid to their native countries, and 
the careless talker. All this in addition to the many other 
duties looked after by the FBI. He coordinated every law 
enforcement agency in this section in a manner that kept 
it free from an attack from within. 

As he said in announcing his resignation: "We were 
at war with the Axis agents long before the war actually 



broke out. We were charged with the security of the home 
front. That battle never ceased. The war is over. We've 
seen it through." 

We can add nothing more to that statement, it is so self- 
evident. He did a swell job. Nat Pieper deserves the relief 
from the exacting work of directing the Bureau's business 
in this area. 

He likes San Francisco and is going to make this city 
his home. He is going into public relations here and has 
formed his own firm of consultants. More of this in a later 
issue. 

Nat Pieper before coming to San Francisco was a special 
agent in various cities of this country and participated in 
many major cases. He helped in the apprehension of John 
Paul Chase and the running down of "Baby Face" Nelson. 

He practiced law in St. Louis, Mo., before joining the 
FBI eleven years ago. 

He will be missed by many peace officers of this state, 
but his successor will find many friends here as he was 
assigned to the Los Angeles district some years ago. 

"San Francisco has been good to me," Chief Pieper 
stated in his farewell announcement. We will counter with 
— you have been good to San Francisco, Chief Pieper. 

The following is a letter the retired chief sent to The 
Police .and Peace Officers Journal, which we gladly 
print : 

Mr. Opie Warner, 

Editor of the Police and Peace Officers Journal. 

Dear Opie: 

When I came to San Francisco as Special Agent in 
Charge of the FBI over eight years ago, I became a member 
of the Bay Counties Peace Officers Association. I was very 
impressed by the friendly spirit of co-operation and the 
real desire to be helpful that was evidenced by the peace 
officers in countless ways. During the years that followed 
so many have given their assistance that I find it difficult 
to thank them adequately. 

As you know the Director has accepted my resignation 
as Special Agent in Charge of the FBI, effective September 
15, 1945. I am going to establish my own firm in the field 
of Public Relations here in San Francisco and while I 
shall no longer be a peace officer, I shall still have a great 
deal of interest in law enforcement. 

I hope that I may be permitted to meet again with the 
association so that I may have an opportunity to express 
my thanks personally. Until then would you permit me to 
express my deep felt thanks to the Peace Officers of the 
Bay Counties through the JOURNAL. 

The Bay Counties' Peace Officers' Association is recog- 
nised as an important association in the field of law en- 
forcement. Greater relationships and many contributions 
to better law enforcement have been realized through the 
association. 

It has been a real privilege to have worked with the Bay 
Counties Peace Officers. Sincerely, Nat Pieper. 



Page 14 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



October, 194 J 



Richmond's Police Department War Record 



By Cliff Sweetland 



When the sprawling City of Richmond, with its miles 
of tidelands along San Pablo Bay, heard the news of Pearl 
Harbor, not a soul perhaps in its 30,000 to 40,000 residents 
could foresee the population increase that was to come in 
the following few months, with the erection of vast ship- 
yards there. 

Certainly Richmond's Chief of Police, L. E. Jones, 




Chief L. E. Jones 

could not foresee that a low of arrests of 946 in 1930 was 
to jump to a total of 43,601 in the fiscal year ending in 
June, 194i. 

Yet those are the figures from the official reports to the 
Mayor and City Council, for the two years mentioned. 

First problem, of course, to face Chief Jones and his 
men in the boom of shipbuilding and tank construction in 
the war-swollen city, was drunkenness following payday. 

During the peak of easy money for thousands of war 
workers recruited from every state in the nation, it was 
not uncommon for week-end roundups of intoxicated men 
and women to run as high as 200. 

Facilities in the jail were taxed to the limit, but gradu- 
ally visiting inebriates learned that there was no leniency. 
It was $20 or a few days in the County Jail at Martinez. 

Heavily taxed, too, were the facilities of the Bureau of 
Identification, under the guidance of able Inspector W. B. 
Smith. His files today are packed with fingerprints and 
records of thousands of persons, many of whom have 
former criminal records, and have been released to police 
of the many states where they are wanted. 

A brief breakdown of official reports for the twenty- 
year period, 1925 to 1945, tells its own story of the nec- 
essity the force faced for more peace officers. 

In the annual report for 1925, total arrests made by 
Richmond police were 1344. By 1940 the total had grown 



to 5,421, normal with the natural increase in population 
of the growing community. 

But in this year's report for the fiscal year ending last 
June, the figures had swollen to 13,646 arrests for all 
charges from drunkenness to felonies, and 29,955 persons 
given traffic citations for one violation or another. 

By the first of this year the total number of peace of- 
ficers employed at Richmond had risen to one hundred 
and eleven, with one civilian woman clerk on the payroll, 
as Chief Jones' secretary. 

Under Chief Jones, who started on the Richmond force 
almost 40 years ago, and who was a sergeant a quarter of 
a century ago, are the following veterans of more than 20 
years' service. 

They are: Captain of Inspectors, George W. Benglcy, 
who acts as Chief of Police during Jones' absences for 
business or vacation; Captain of Patrolmen, Allen J. 
Cundy; and Lieutenants John Kinstrey, Harry C. Don- 
nelly, Thomas D. Floyd, Frank A. Fray, Lue B. Bradeson; 
and Ernest F. Phipps. 

Under Lieutenant Kinstrey, Richmond's Juvenile De- 
partment has had a busy time during the war. Not only 
was the Juvenile Department faced with vandalism of 
young hoodlums, whose parents could not give the right 
amount of parental supervision because of their jobs in 
the war plants, but more serious problems of child aband- 
Dnment continually cropped up. 

There were many mothers whose husbands were over- 
seas, and who could not resist the temptation of night life 
at downtown and nearby spots, and who just left their 
babies unattended and alone. 

Policewoman Mary Peterson and Dorothy M. Jackson, 
gave the problem all of their vigilance, with the result that 
many mothers and their oifspring were turned over to 
Contra Costa County juvenile authorities at Martinez. 

Another of the tireless officers in Kinstrey 's Juvenile De- 
partment is Inspector John Priest, whose worries run from 
window breaking in schools and the hundreds of war 
workers' dormitories to petty theft of the many phone 
booths, scattered throughout the war housing projects. 

On a comparatively recent night more than twenty 
phone booths were stripped of their coin boxes, presum- 
ably by young thieves, on the loose because their parents 
were too busy to keep an eye on them. 

A total of 22 police patrol cars with two-way radio 
phone are on duty day and night in an endeavor to broaden 
protection for the city. Eight new cars have been added 
in the past year. 

In July a new police wagon went into service, replac- 
ing the station wagon that had served that purpose follow- 
ing Pearl Harbor. The station wagon now has been retired 
to the sole duty of transferring prisoners from Richmond to 
Martinez. 

In addtion to two-way radio telephone communications 
('Continued on page 49) 



October, 1945 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page IS 



BAY COUNTIES' 



Peace Officers* Association 



MEETINGS EVER\ MONTH 



Chief Harold A. Zink. President 



Captain Bernard McDonald, Secretary-Treasurer 



Whenever a meeting of peace ofEcers is scheduled for 
Santa Rosa it calls out a big delegation of those charged 
or who are interested in law enforcement. The meeting of 
the Bay Counties' Peace Officers' Association, held on Sep- 
tember 30 was no exception of the line record of attendance 
the past years have set. Chief Melvin Flohr, who shared 
the honors with Sheriff Patterson as host, drew one of the 
largest number of members and guests of the Association 
for this meeting. Upwards of 200 gathered at Lena's Buen 
Gusto's restaurant, where the popular Lena prepared a 
luncheon that was a knockout, featuring as the main dish 
roast duck. 

Dr. Leo McMahon told a few human interest stories. 
At the conclusion of the luncheon. President H. A. Zink 
called the meeting to order and presented Chief Flohr, 
who welcomed the visitors again to his native city and pro- 
ceeded to introduce prominent citizens of Santa Rosa. 

City Manager J. A. Lorburn gave another official wel- 
come and in his few remarks dwelt on the spirit of co- 
operation that has existed between the Police Departments 
of his city and those of adjoining communities. 

In turn others presented by Chief Flohr were Sheriff 
Patterson, City Auditor John Hoff, Sergeant Emilie Sa- 
vani. Coast Guardsman Tom Campion, District Attorney 
McGoldrick, Assistant District Attorney Joseph Maddox, 
Deputy Sheriff Andy Johnson and FBI Agent James 
Breshahan. 

Preliminary to the main business of the meeting William 
Schoppe said that the Motor Vehicle Department was try- 
ing to bring back the two plates for automobiles, but that 
it had given an order before the Japanese war ended for 
over 3,000,000 tabs to be fastened to the single rear plate 
of the current white and black, now in use. He quoted 
the Motor Vehicle Department as saying that they are 
working to see if the change could be made and that when 
two plates were again in use they would be black and 
orange as before the war. 

President Zink in his notice of the meeting stated a 
panel discussion would be had on qualifications, educa- 
tion, training and betterment of conditions for police of- 
ficers. He recalled that a meeting of a few police officials 
had been held in San Francisco to discuss this topic and 
that it had worked out a plan to serve as something to 
work from, subject to such changes as it might be deter- 
mined by the Association to make. 

He called on Deputy Michael Riordan of San Francisco 
to lead off the discussion. 

Chief Riordan said after stating that because of estab- 
lished rules regarding residential qualifications this subject 



was omitted, that to get the proper men to enforce the 
law of the State's municipalities these municipalities had 
to offer some inducements to returning war veterans to 
take up this exacting work. 

Young men faced with over 20-years' duties on night 
watches would not be attracted by small salaries, inade- 
quate pension, or long tenure of service before eligible 
for retirement. 

He said that it had been tentatively agreed that the 
age limit for former police officers to enter the service as 
from 21 to 30; that a uniform minimum salary be adopted 
for all police departments of the State, and that every 
recruit be given a course in a regional preinduction school, 
and a curriculum be adopted that would bring about pro- 
fessional understanding among those who attended. 

Chief Zink added to this by saying that the instruction 
in these pre-training schools should be conducted by regu- 
lar police officers, in zones throughout California. 

District Attorney Ralph Hoyt of Alameda County de- 
clared police officers should get better salaries than skilled 
mechanics as the policeman deals with important problems, 
including those of life and death. He must be so trained 
that he can make important and infallible decisions on the 
spot of a crime. 

The skilled mechanic he claimed gets $3600 a year, 
a police officer two-thirds of that sum, and he said if we 
are to attract the flower of our manhood we must have 
a minimum wage for policemen of $1.50 per hour. 

Chief Tracy of Oakland put $250 as the minimum of 
a policeman's salary. He urged the establishment of zone 
schools to professionalize police work, and said it was up 
to law enforcement officers to get the public's support 
for raising it to a higher standard. 

Chief Flohr said in his part of the discussion that a 
small city's policeman had a wider range of duties than 
those of larger cities. He said because of the smaller size 
of the former they could maintain no bureaus made up of 
men specially fitted for different specialized investigations. 
In the matter of preinduction schools he said smaller com- 
munities could profit by getting men from larger ones to 
give lectures. Pointing out the good Inspector James John- 
son, head of the Burglary Detail of the San Francisco 
Police Department, had done in presenting his lectures 
on safe robberies before the classes of officers from sur- 
rounding counties that was meeting at that time in Santa 
Rosa. 

He said those sent to such schools from surrounding 
towns and cities could be put up in barracks during the 
('Continued on page 26) 



Page 16 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL October, ]94J 

Some Are '^True'^ and Some Are False ---Rate Yourself 



52. The opinions and inferences of witnesses are never 
admissible in evidence. 

5 3. No evidence of any writing may be introduced until 
the same shall have been first shown to the opposite party. 

54. A peace officer is empowered to break into a build- 
ing in certain circumstances to serve a subpoena. 

55. Every warrant for the arrest of a witness — as a 
witness — must be directed to the sheriff of the county 
wherein the court out of which the warrant issues is 
located. 

56. If a witness is a prisoner confined in a prison within 
this State, an order for his examination at such prison 
upon deposition may be made by any judge of the court 
having jurisdiction of the case. 

57. A subpoena may be issued by any judge, justice, 
or clerk of any court in this State. 

58. The principal reason for the issuance of so many 
traffic tags is the fact that the stipulated fines are too small 
— hence no deterrent. 

59. At scenes of strikes and other labor troubles mounted 
men are more useful than motorcycle patrolmen; the latter, 
than foot patrolmen. 

60. One witness, who is entitled to full credit, and who 
is giving direct evidence, is sufficient for the proof of any 
fact. 

61. In the interpretation of a statute containing several 
provisions the judge may adopt only such a construction 
as will give effect to a^ provisions. 

62. The law does r I permit conclusive evidence to he 
contradicted. 

■ 63. The jury may I jeve or disbelieve any witness. 

64. Facts which h knows of his own knowledge are 
the only ones to whic.i a witness can testify. 

65. It is characteristic of narcotic sellers that they con- 
duct their sales on the streets. 

66. A "spot map" — showing location and distribution 
of aliens — is of very definite assistance both to police de- 
partments and the FBI. 

67. At a street intersection, where both vehicular and 
pedestrian traffic are heavy, one of the three most import- 
ant things which a traffic officer can do to avoid accidents 
and e.xpedite traffic is: Restrain motorists from making 
turns that would congest traffic and endanger pedestrians. 

68. The number of times a traffic officer appears in 
traffic court for technical enforcement of minor infrac- 
tions is one method of checking upon his efficiency. 

69. The most important factor in the matter of taking 
photographs at the scene of a homicide is a showing of 
measurements and proportions. 

70. City highway fatalities, statistics show, are due to 
three chief causes: Jay walking, crossing against signals, 
and collisions. 

7L The principal reason for maintaining a patrol duty. 



by detectives in civilian dress, is to have at hand a force of 
trained men accessible for quick emergency use. 

72. Before obtaining and accepting theoral description 
of suspects from compainants or other witnesses, the prin- 
cipal precaution the investigating officer should take is to 
see there is no '"frame up." 

73. In "tailing", the most important point to consider 
is: First locate the "woman" or the "sugar daddy" in the 
case. 

74. A criminal's guilt may be established by moral 
certainty. 

75. Conclusive evidence is impossible of contradiction. 

76. To properly testify a witness must know personally 
of the facts to which he testifies. 

77. Upon a trial a witness can be heard only in the 
presence of all parties. 

78. A public officer may be examined upon all com- 
munications made to him in his official capacity. 

79. Children under ten years of age cannot be witnesses. 

80. The jury must judge of the effect of evidence in 
subordination to the rules of evidence. 

81. One witness is sufficient to prove perjury in certain 
circumstances. 

82. All the rules of evidence in civil actions are appli- 
cable in criminal cases. 

83. A guilty intent is conclusively presumed from the 
deliberate commission of an unlawful act. 

84. If the judge at a trial becomes a witness the trial 
must be ordered before another judge. 

85. The jury may believe or disbelieve any witness. 

86. The motives of the witness may repel the presump- 
tion that he speaks the truth. 

87. Assault to commit murder may carry a sentence 
of ten years. 

88. The death sentence may be inflicted for kidnapping 
for blackmail in California. 

89. Upon a plea other than guilty the court must pro- 
ceed to hear the case. 

90. Misdemeanors are punishable only in the county 
jail and felonies in the state prisons. 

91. In a court action the defendant must be personally 
present before the trial can proceed. 

92. Bribing a witness is a misdemeanor. 

93. The felonious taking of domestic fowls of a value 
of $50.00 is grand theft. 

Note: In last month's edition the following numbered 
questions were true: 4, 'i, S. 10. 11. 14, 23, 2.5, 27, 32, 
36, 40, 43, 45, 46. fQ and 5 1, 

GRaystone 02 31 

KEYSTONE HOTEL APARTMENTS 



I 369 HYDE STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



COMPLIMENTS 

Musso's Prescription Pharmacy 

SAN BRUNO AND BACON STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



October, J 945 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 17 



NEW FASHIONS IN FOOD 

Luncheon 12-2 — Dinner 5-10 

De Luxe Sunday Dinner 
from 2:00 'til 9:30 

COCKTAIL HOUR 
EVERY AFTERNOON 

Home of 57 Variety Smorgasbord 
(Hors d' Oeuvres Table) 

Rickey's 
Studio Club 

Phone: Palo Alto 8637 

4219 El Camino Real 

Next to Palo Alto Elks Club, Palo Alto 



Ask Your Dealer 
For 

Red Feather Stencils & 
Duplicator Supplies 



Manufactured by 

RED FEATHER PRODUCTS, LTD. 

Redwood City, California 



Town 
Club 



606 FERRY STREET 



Martinez, California 



CAL'S 
PLACE. 

E. G. Calanchini 

LIQUORS 

WINES 

BEER 

Phone. Bal 6290 

600 South First Street 
San Jose, California 



Page 18 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



October, 1945 



Praise Letters to Chief Dullea 



"We are writing this letter in behalf of the Police 
Department and Officer John Curtain, Potrero Police Dis- 
trict. At 2:00 o'clock Sunday morning, June 10, 1945, 
our premises were broken into by an employee who bat' 
tered down the door into a tenant's warehouse and then 
broke into the door of our offices which happened to be 
protected by A. D. T. This brought the Police Depart' 
ment and owing to unusual circumstances of a man break' 
ing through our tenant's warehouse, which neither the 
police nor ourselves had access to during the night, it is 
only a miracle that the man was ever caught. It so hap- 
pened that on Sunday morning, there was another alarm 
given by this burglar and when Officer Curtain came in 
on the case, it was his diligence and persistence that 
brought about the apprehension of the burglar. After other 
guards furnished by A. D. T. and other members of the 
force decided that the man was not there, Officer Curtain 
put on some old clothes and continued to make a further 
search of the premises which were dark and dusty. 

He caught the burglar hiding behind a pile of sacks in 
our warehouse. We wish again to express our thanks to the 
department and to Officer Curtain. 

Consolidated Milling Co. 

151 Bay Shore Blvd. 

By Richard Van Hoosear." 

* * * 

"At the close of this school term, we want to bring to 
your attention, the splended work which Officer Harry 
Gurtler, Co. A, is doing with the pupils of the Washing' 
ton'Irving School, Broadway and Sansome Streets. The 
principal. Miss Edna Harrington, reports that he is most 
helpful with all the pupils, but I am especially grateful 
for his attention to the pupils in the ungraded class. These 
children are mentally retarded and are in need of every 
help in order that they will become lawabiding citizens. 
It has been reported to this office that Officer Gurtler has 
been especially kind and helpful to this group, aiding the 
school in rehabilitating these underprivileged children. 
I trust this officer will be commended for his meritorious 
services to these children. 

Nell Eager O'Connell 
Washington-Irving School 

* * * 

"On June 23, 1945, at about 4:30 p.m., in response to a 
telephone call to the Emergency Hospital, one of your 
officers from the Traffic Department appeared on the 
scene of the accident, 44 Madrone Avenue. I am advised 
that this officer was George C. Leahy, Accident Preven- 
tion Bureau. Will you please convey to Officer Leahy, or 
if it were not Leahy, to the officer who was there, my 
sincere thanks for his kindness and courtesy to me. The 
officer did his job efficiently and tactfully and is, I think, 
a credit to the Department. 

C. V. Patterson, Asst. Engineer, 
Bureau of Engineering, Public Works, 



"In behalf of the officers and members of the Marina 
Boosters, Inc., I want to express to you sincere apprecia- 
tion for the honor and privilege of having Mrs. Kathlyn 
Sullivan, Policewoman, as our speaker at the meeting of 
Thursday, June 28th, 1945. Mrs. Sullivan addressed an 
audience of Marina Booster members, our troup of Boy 
Scouts and their parents. Her subject was one of vital 
interest to all and especially appreciated for the skill with 
which it was delivered. Mrs. Sullivan's talk should be 
heard by thousands of parents of teen-age boys and girls. 
We hope that we may have the honor of having her again 
when we have an audience of parents only and adults. 
Again thanking you and with best wishes to Mrs. Sullivan 
for her spirit of understanding and kindliness and express- 
ing the hope that her work among the young people of 
our city may continue with much success, I am 

Al Rossi, President, 

Marina Boosters, Inc." 

* * * 

"May I take this opportunity to express to you and to 
your men our most sincere appreciation of your prompt 
and courteous attention to our letter regarding working 
women who must travel our streets unescorted at night. 
The visits of your officers and the constant patrolling by 
your men has helped to solve a most difficult problem, and 
has earned the commendation of the entire district. 

Mrs. Wm. A. Knight, Sec'y. 
Mission Viaduct Terrace 

Improvement Club." 

* * * 

"About a week ago we had occasion to call your Taraval 
Station regarding neighbors who allowed their puppy to 
whine and yelp at all hours of the day and night, thereby 
constituting a nuisance to those who like a fair degree of 
peace and quietness, and in answer to our call Officer 
E. Thiele, called on Mrs. Holt, and upon her acquainting 
him with the source of the trouble he immediately called 
the attention of the neighbor owning the puppy to the 
annoyance it was causing the neighbors, and succeeded in 
having the annoyance abated. Officer Thiele, who was in 
a radio patrol car, acted with tact and diplomacy in ap- 
proaching the offenders, thus avoiding any unnecessary 
neighborhood 'feud' that might have arisen, and I think it 
only right that his successful mediation in this matter 
should be called to your attention. 

C. E. Holt, 

Stock Transfer Agent, 

Pacific Gas & Electric Co. 

* * * 

"We are pleased to quote a letter from a resident of 
Chicago concerning the handling of her complaint by Lieu- 
tenant Stohl, of the San Francisco Police Department. The 
writer of the letter is Mrs. Louise Child, 1358 North Dear' 
born Street, Chicago 10, Illinois. 

" 'When I was in San Francisco recently, I reported 
to your office an excessive cab fare charged by a driver for 



October, 194? 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 19 



an independent cab company. I was referred to Lieutenant 
Stohl of the Police Department. Lieutenant Stohl was most 
courteous to me and made the report, he obtained and 
returned to me a refund of the fare charged . . .' 

"Once again, we, thank you and your department for 
the excellent cooperation received. 

Muriel TsvetkofF, 
General Manager, 
Better Business Bureau." 

"I wish to take this opportunity to thank your Depart- 
ment for the service shown us in connection with the acci- 
dent we had on June 8th, and to especially thank your two 
Officers Murray and Cahill for their courtesy and ki